THCB

Finally, Quality We Really Care About

Patient-centered care and patient engagement have become central to the vision of a high value health delivery system. The delivery system is evolving from a fee-for-service transactional payment model to a value-based purchasing model using outcome data and quality improvement and attainment. The Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and private payers have spurred delivery redesign of networks that focuses on a set of clinical quality measures and patient care experiences along with efficiency measures.

However, the questions we ultimately really care are: “Did I get better? Am I healthier?”

With the advent of Facebook, PatientsLikeMe® and Avado, consumers and patients are sharing their healthcare experiences openly with their support system and strangers with similar illnesses. Our delivery system has yet to leverage the power of patient/consumer reported data in feeding back to care deliverers in the quality improvement cycle.

Clinical quality measures have traditionally consisted of process or surrogate measures and centered on providers and hospitals. As we move toward a system based on value, the measurement system must shift as well. Part of this movement will be utilizing outcomes directly reported from patients and their caretakers and incorporating these outcomes into quality improvement initiatives and payment models. The widespread adoption of standardized and validated patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) would accelerate the development of a patient-centered health system. However, new standards; patient-friendly, digitally-enabled instruments; secure portals; and more research will be required to facilitate adoption.

Patient-Centered Care And Patient Engagement As National Priorities

The Institute of Medicine’s 2001 landmark report, “Crossing the Quality Chasm,” listed patient-centered care as one of its six aims. The Affordable Care Act reaffirmed the import of patient-centered care through a number of its provisions, including the piloting of patient-centered medical homes and the creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.  The National Quality Strategy enumerates “Ensuring that each person and family are engaged as partners in their care” as one of six priorities to help achieve the three aims of better care, better health, and lower costs.

Simultaneously, a movement among patients and a number of organizations, such as the Society for Participatory Medicine and Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care, around these goals has flourished. In response to these currents in health care, hospital administrators across the country have launched of a number of initiatives targeting patient-centered care and patient engagement.

Additionally, the Affordable Care Act mandates the use of quality and patient care experiences as part of the qualification of health plans in the new State Insurance exchanges. The type of data and their uses are still to be determined during the ongoing insurance exchanges setup process. Undoubtedly, PROMs would be powerful and robust data to empower consumers in the selection of networks, plans or future ACOs.

Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Used In Limited Settings

PROMs, which measure a specific construct, such as health status, symptoms, functional status, or quality of life, have been developed over time and used in research and by payers. For example, in 2004 the National Institutes of Health created PROMIS (Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System). Collaborative research across a number of centers led to the creation a series of brief, valid measurements of physical, mental, and social health.

The VR-12, which measures physical and mental health, has been used by the Veterans Health Administration, CMS, and the National Committee for Quality Assurance for quality assessment. Numerous disease specific measures exist as well.  As David Lansky, Executive Director of Pacific Business Group on Health, points out, Sweden adopted PROMs for orthopedic procedures and has data collected from 90 percent of patients one year after their surgery. The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire measures health status for heart failure patients, and the Seattle angina questionnaire assesses those with coronary artery disease.

Despite the use of PROMs for research and quality assurance in select populations, adoption across larger populations have been limited by a number of factors, including complexity of instruments, resources necessary for administration, and a lack of recognized value by payers, providers, and patients. With the importance of patient-centered care, patient engagement, and PROMs becoming increasingly recognized, we recommend the following to encourage the adoption of PROMs.

  • Develop standards to capture structured data from patients and families. The Office of the National Coordinator for HIT (ONC) and the HIT Standards Federal Advisory Committee have done a laudable job in creating standards for data inputted by providers. The certification process has reinforced the use of specified standards, such as rxNorm and SNOMED, for provider-reported data in EHRs as structured data. Similarly, patient-reported data will need a standardized data model to capture patient symptoms and health, such as difficulty breathing, functional status, or mental health. The need for standards will become increasingly important as we begin to move beyond capturing simple information, such as five-point Likert scales in PHQ-9 for depression, to more complicated information.
  • Create patient-friendly, digitally enabled instruments. Given the varying levels of health literacy and technology comfort across populations, we need to develop reliable and valid tools that are simple, quick, and optimized for health IT.  Priority should be given to high-impact conditions, such as heart failure, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, depression, and cerebrovascular disease.
  • Develop portals for patient reporting optimized for mobile devices. We also need to develop secure portals enabling patients to report outcome data seamlessly either from home or at their provider’s office. Ideally, these portals would be optimized for smartphones or tablets. Already one-third of Americans are smartphone owners, and this number will likely continue to increase. Similarly, tablet ownership has been rapidly rising, notably from 3 percent in May 2010 to 19 percent in January 2012. As more Americans continue to access the Internet via mobile devices, we need to develop the tools to leverage these relatively easy-to-use technologies. Data submitted via these portals could be stored in a patient’s electronic health record and then used for quality improvement or reporting, or both.
  • Research whether adoption of PROMs translate into better health and better care. As numerous studies have pointed out, the evidence supporting the ability of health IT to improve quality and health IT is mixed. Health IT may indeed have unintended consequences, such as resulting in more frequent diagnostic testing. We need to better understand whether the adoption of PROMs will lead to better care and better health. We also need to develop electronic clinical decision support tools that will be needed to drive quality improvement on these measures and the electronic reporting structure to submit them to payers.

Interest in PROMs continues to grow rapidly. The proposed regulation for Meaningful Use Stage 2 underscores CMS’s interest in PROMs through its requirement for patient engagement functionality and inclusion of three proposed electronic quality measures incorporating patient-reported functional status. Some of the ONC Beacon communities are piloting PROMs and implementing them in clinical practice. Care Partners Plus®, a for-profit company, created a patient-feedback system for use in provider offices immediately after patient appointments, which could be used for PROMs as well.

Our ability to capture information from patients and integrate it into electronic health records and clinical care is rapidly evolving. As we move toward a patient-centered, high value health system, PROMs can play an integral role if we develop the needed standards, tools, portals and evidence base.

Thomas Tsang, MD, FACP, led the quality strategy within ONC and worked with the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovations on innovative delivery system reforms. He is currently a clinical advisor to Avado, SA Ignite and Acupera, new HIT companies focused on lowering cost and improving quality.

Faraz Ahmad, MD, graduated from the University of Chicago School of Medicine with honors in 2009, and he completed his Internal Medicine Residency in 2012. He is a member of both the Center for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Safety and the Center for Therapeutic Effectiveness Research at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

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Lebron VII LowuggNatalie CliftonJohn Damounim2012 Recent comment authors
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Lebron VII Low
Guest

Selepas rehat Aqid terdengar suara seseorang memanggil namanya.Satu hari, Dan dia juga sedorm denganku sejak tingkatan tiga lagi. Nasib baik ada budak jumpa kau dan pergi bagitau warden. Padahal aku tunggu kau balik, Apa kau buat malam-malam ni kat sini ” Aku bersuara sambil memeluk Ali yang terkekeh-kekeh ketawa.Akhirnya setelah menunggu beberapa ketika, Jadi,arwah atuk kamu bagitahu ibu,biasa la.

ugg
Guest

Er 枚ffnete langsam die Augen und sehen Sie die lange verschollene Cao Yingti mit Gras gr眉ne Tasche, tr盲gt eine beige Mantel Nizi stand Qiaosheng Sheng vor. Lange vorbei, sie ist immer noch elegant, aber mehr als ein Hauch von Gesichtsz眉gen zu beseitigen das irakische Volk ist abgemagert waren mager.

John Damouni
Guest

@NatalieClifton: Hi Natalie, I’m sorry to hear that you’ve had a rough week. There is no need to apologize about feeling pessimistic, especially when you are exposed to the circumstances you mentioned above. I wanted to first let you know that my article was not intended to “compare” hospitals to hotels. The article was meant to elicit best practices from the hospitality industry that healthcare can benefit from. The bottom line is that no one goes to a hospital on vacation. I understand the fundamental differences between the two industries, and while I do not compare them, I do think… Read more »

Natalie Clifton
Guest
Natalie Clifton

John: Yes, I also beg forgiveness in my delayed response, as well, and did read your post about the parallel of hospitals and hotels. I did see a lot of ways in which healthcare staffing can be improved and in many ways I see the changes taking place at my facility as we speak. The organization I am employed by has gone to great lengths in providing and becoming an industry leader in patient satisfaction. I have been through Senn Delaney, attend several coaching workshops, and feel I minored in human behavior and perception in college and my mom owned… Read more »

John Damouni
Guest

@NatalieClifton Hi! I apologize for the delay in responding! So while “Office Space” is one of my favorite movies!, SEERhealth is a technology company and not technically a consulting service. While we do offer consulting services, we specialize implementing the SEER technology platform to improve the Credentialing, Healthcare Quality Assurance, Privileging, Operational Performance, Multi-Facility Healthcare Delivery Systems, Risk Management, and Centralized & Standardized Process Management for healthcare systems. Everyone in my organization is very passionate about improving different facets of healthcare operation, and are committed to sharing our knowledge with the healthcare community- this is why we blog, write white… Read more »

Natalie Clifton
Guest
Natalie Clifton

@JohnDamouni – Thank you for your response. I did look at SEERhealth’s website and it appears you all are a consulting service. I always think of the movie “Office Space” when I hear about these services. It just grinds my nerves a bit when an organization has to get an outsider to solve the problems they pay so many within the organization to do. No offense to you or your employer, but many of the problems I see are “as plain as the nose on our faces.” Many young leaders are pointing out our shortcomings and bringing fiscally responsible and… Read more »

John Damouni
Guest

@NatalieClifton- Your perception is spot on. I can tell that you are passionate about delivering exceptional service to patients! You are right, it all begins with a cultural change. The parameters of that culture of service are best defined by the professionals who interact daily with patients. However, that change must be driven by the hospital administration. At the end of the day, the administration has the responsibility for ‘allowing’ that service culture to flourish. They must ensure that all Healthcare professionals working within their systems have the necessary tools and are empowered to deliver exceptional service to patients. Everyone… Read more »

Natalie Clifton
Guest
Natalie Clifton

@JohnDamouni – ‘the patient’s experience drives their perception of the care being delivered” As a nurse working at the bedside, I very much agree with your statement. It is amazing the difference in perspective of those nurses and other healthcare professionals who graduated 5-10 years ago and those who have graduated since the patient and family centered approach started being reinforced. I find bedside reporting, hourly rounding, setting patient and family expectations, involving them in the plan of care, and just smiling and being personable have made dramatic improvements to the system I work for along with the unit. Many… Read more »

John Damouni
Guest

I admire your take on improving the overall patient experience in healthcare. I share your view on this issue, and would also add that it all begins with linking patient experience to quality. ultimately, the patient’s experience drives their perception of the care being delivered. Healthcare systems must be able to identify and articulate their patients’ value proposition, and then measure and tackle the areas in need of improvement. I personally think that using the available technology to measure patients satisfaction, track service breakdown issues and report that information is key to achieving a higher standard of service and quality.… Read more »

m2012
Guest

@rbaer – It’s a reasonable complaint that much of the industry seems to have profit as a higher motive than improving the system. Patient satisfaction is also a hugely important variable. While it’s not mentioned in the post per se, I don’t think that Tsang is going for an infomercial approach. I’m guessing he’s writing about the area of research that he has worked on and believes in, and now he’s an advisor to companies who are trying to solve these issues from a business perspective. Much of the current assesment tools out there (including 30dy mortality or complications, readmisson… Read more »

userlogin
Editor

@ Rbaer. So what?

The problem with your argument is that in your desire to score cheap points you skip the entire conversation about quality and the very real need for better measures.

The kind of second and third generation approach to outcomes reporting the authors describe will have a revolutionary effect on the care. The data we’re using is shockingly inadequate for the task at hand – and in many cases worse than nothing at all.

Seriously, enough already with the anybody who-is-in-business-is-horribly- tainted-and-must-be-evil-therefore-everything-they-are-saying-doesn’t-apply-because-I-don’t-like-them-nyah-nyah-nyah- crap.

rbaer
Guest
rbaer

So why don’t you say anything of substance i/o just unverifiable claims? (“The kind of second and third generation approach to outcomes reporting the authors describe will have a revolutionary effect on the care.”)

“anybody who-is-in-business-is-horribly- tainted-and-must-be-evil-therefore-everything-they-are-saying-doesn’t-apply-because-I-don’t-like-them-nyah-nyah-nyah- crap.”
This is also called “conflict of interest”. If you think this concept is outdated or for soe reason not of concern, try to make your point, but na-na, na-na, boo-boo, stick your head in doo-doo like arguments don’t cut it.

dan
Guest

Very interesting, good to see people discussing this finally.
-Dan
Medical Supplies

rbaer
Guest
rbaer

Thomas Tsang “is currently a clinical advisor to Avado, SA Ignite and Acupera, new HIT companies focused on lowering cost and improving quality”.

These companies also focus on profit, and this post is an infomercial. Major problems such as poor utility of satisfaction as outcome measure
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1108766 are unmentioned. And to postulate “we need to develop reliable and valid tools that are simple, quick, and optimized for health IT” is a meaningless proposition.

Botox NY
Guest

It is very fine blog about health care. In here the description about patient care is very beautiful and inspired.