Uncategorized

POLICY: No smoking in England By Dr. Eric Novack

In Matthew’s homeland, the National Health Service controls the vast majority of healthcare services available.  Resources are limited—but the government is in control.

In the interest of safety (or is it savings?) restrictions have been placed on joint replacements for people with a body mass index of >30. This would effectively preclude half of all US adults from total hip and knee replacements.

But now a new announcement: No surgery if you smoke.

While smoking is clearly bad for you, should it disqualify you from surgery?
If  smoking and obesity, why not junk food? Or inadequate exercise? Or any other habit / activity that is deemed not ‘for the public good”?   

Maybe we will tax ‘unhealthy’ behaviors and earmark that money for entirely unrelated specific budget items?
                  Oh, yeah, we already do.
                  This passed in 2006 in Arizona…

As we think about healthcare reform, preserving and expanding liberty ought to be first and foremost on our minds.

Livongo’s Post Ad Banner 728*90

Categories: Uncategorized

Tagged as:

7
Leave a Reply

7 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
4 Comment authors
green cigarettePeterStella BaskombTom Leith Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
green cigarette
Guest

This is crazy, what if those people don’t have the ability to quit smoking? Not everybody has the strong will you know.

Tom Leith
Guest
Tom Leith

Just so, Peter. To hold liberty as the highest public good leads precicely to “you’re free not to be able to afford it”. And if we hold liberty as the highest public good, the results of other people’s bad behavior does not cost all of us — it costs only the individuals who choose individually and on an ad hoc basis to bear the cost. This may well be nobody.
t

Peter
Guest
Peter

Well Tom, the results of other peoples bad behavior costs all of us. The question I guess is how do we pay for bad behavior and how do we change bad behavior. Insurance companies raise your rates when you engage in bad behavior that results in higher costs for them and the other insured, Catholic or Calvinist.
“you’re free to buy it or not” for health insurance could just as well be – you’re free not to be able to afford it or not.

Tom Leith
Guest
Tom Leith

> Is it liberty to allow insurance companies > to charge more for higher risk people? Yes. Of course. Liberty is a two-way street. I’m free to set a price, and you’re free to buy or not. > Isn’t a tax on bad behavior the same as > higher insurance for higher risk? Depends on how the tax money is used. In Canada your case is easier to make. Here its not so clear. Canada (and indeed England & Europe) is, in its heart of hearts and whether it likes it or not, Catholic. Our “public” or “popular” morals tend… Read more »

Peter
Guest
Peter

Eric, did you even read the article, or are you intensionally trying to mislead us? From the aricle: “Smokers are to be denied operations on the Health Service unless they give up cigarettes for at least FOUR WEEKS BEFOREHAND.” Not quit, just stop. 4 weeks! Four weeks, boy that’s a hardship – not! It also said non-stoppers would get surgery but MAY would wait longer. Wow, what a draconian measure – save me,save me! So Eric is it “liberty” to have the freedom to squander scarce resources? I guess you also think it’s “liberty” to be able to pollute. “While… Read more »

Stella Baskomb
Guest
Stella Baskomb

“While smoking is clearly bad for you, should it disqualify you from surgery? If smoking and obesity, why not junk food? Or inadequate exercise? Or any other habit / activity that is deemed not ‘for the public good”? ”
Of course. And to make it fair, I still say just execute every tenth person. Excepting politicians and doctors of course.

Tom Leith
Guest
Tom Leith

> As we think about healthcare reform,
> preserving and expanding liberty ought
> to be first and foremost on our minds.
No. As we think about healthcare reform, preserving and expanding human solidarity ought to be first and foremost on our minds. Solidarity makes claims on liberty.
t