Matthew Holt

Matthew Holt
Matthew Holt is the founder and publisher of The Health Care Blog and still writes regularly for the site. He is also the co-founder of the Health 2.0 Conference, as well as a Founding Principal of the associated consulting firm Health 2.0 Advisors.

Matthew talks, Fred listens

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After years interviewing people at HIMSS, I got interviewed by a patient (as in putting up with me, not sick!) Fred Goldstein. My pearls of wisdom include the history of EMRs, eHealth, and how much money HIMSS makes by not buying food! Thanks to Greg Masters of Health Innovation Media for this and all he does!–Matthew Holt

LIVE from @HiMSS 2016 | Meet Matt Holt @boltyboy Co-chair @Health2con from Health Innovation Media on Vimeo.

Interview: Steve Curd, CEO Wanda

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Another interview from the HIMSS conference earlier this month. The idea behind these interviews is that they give you a quick overview of the companies, and a sense of where the system as a whole is going.

As opposed to interviews with Philips & Xerox, this is one with a real start up called Wanda. CEO Steve Curd was early on at Healtheon (later WebMD) and then CEO of a startup called CareinSync which sold to Hearst. Now Wanda is a brand new well-funded startup (from a UK based-fund called Net Scientific) focused on patient engagement and behavior change using an interesting mix of psychology and analytics (unlike Monty Python’s suggested technique of sarcasm and extreme violence!).

Xerox–Tamara StClaire interview

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Another interview from the HIMSS conference earlier this month. The idea behind these interviews is that they give you a quick overview of the companies, and a sense of where the system as a whole is going.

Today is an interview with Tamara StClaire, chief innovation officer of Xerox Healthcare. She not only has some information on what Xerox is up to (including a hint about its new population health management platform) called Health Outcomes Solutions. But also some data from a study Xerox did on the readiness of providers to move to value based care (Hint: not very!) I also want to know what inspired the eyeroll in the video still below? Not me, surely!

Philips — Interview with Carla Kriwet

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Now I’ve got them uploaded and semi edited I’ll be running the interviews I did at the HIMSS conference earlier this month. They will hopefully give you a quick overview of the companies, and give you a sense of where the system is going.

Today is an interview with Carla Kriwet, CEO of Patient Care and Monitoring Solutions at Philips. The Dutch electronics giant has a huge footprint in the hospital and big ambitions outside it.

Omar Hussein, CEO Imprivata

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This is the first of a series of interviews I’m doing at the behemoth HIMSS conference. They will hopefully give you a quick overview of the companies, and give you a sense of where the system is going.

First up, grabbed in the corridor is a quick interview with Omar Hussain, CEO of widely used data security company Imprivata. (They incidentally had a rocking party last night, and in case you were wondering this interview was filmed before not at the party!)

Accolade flying flag as patient advocates

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I have spent years whining that no one is doing a good job helping people navigate through the maze of health care. And a survey out last week from my old firm Harris paid for by Accolade confirms that people need help. Doctors don’t and can’t do this. 71% of people said they trusted their doctors, but only 16% said their doctors had time to understand their life circumstances. Yet last summer a touted Silicon Valley startup called Better failed to make a go of a service doing just that.

Somehow Accolade seems to be threading this needle. They’ve raised more than $125m (including another $30m late last year beyond what I discuss in this interview). While they’re helping patients they’re charging their employers and insurers for the service. Late last summer I met Accolade’s EVP Amy Loftus. In this interview she explains what they do, and how it works.

Seth Sternberg talks about Honor

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Seth Sternberg was a founder at instant message service Meebo, which was acquired by Google in 2012, and like many tech guys he’s next decided to try to change the health care experience. But unlike many others the aspect he wanted to change was the in home caregiving market, following a bad experience with his own mother. Honor came out from under wraps last year, raised $20m, and is currently operating in Los Angeles and San Francisco. It’s not only a market place where you can hire caregivers for a loved one, but it also allows the client, whether they be the person receiving the care or their loved one–that daughter out of town–to manage the process end to end including booking and paying, and allows the caregiver to report on what they are doing, and follow a careplan.

But beyond that Sternberg is on a mission to “professionalize” the caregivers by not only increasing their pay, but accurately matching them to client needs, and increasing their control over their own situation. To that end Honor recently backed off the Uber independent contractor model and made its caregivers full employees (with stock options!). Very interesting guy with an interesting model. Here’s the interview:

Aver: Analytics for Care Episodes –Nick Augustinos interview

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Nick Augustinos was at Healtheon (later WebMD) in the early days, then at Carescience with David Brailer, and later was senior in the health care teams at Cisco and Cardinal. Given Nick isn’t as young as some health tech startup guys and did OK back in the day, you might wonder why he’d leave the cushy corporate world and take on the supervising adult role at a startup.

But he just did, with Aver–an analytics company focusing on incorporating incentives and quality improvement in bundled care. Last month it raised $13.6m in a series B and I had a quick chat with Nick to find out what Aver was up to.

David Vivero, Amino– Yes, We Need Another Doctor Search Company!

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Those of you dismayed at the dearth of recent interviews of notable health tech startups on THCB will be glad to hear I have several in the can and will be putting them up starting with Amino today. And the rest of you can move along….

David Vivero made his money at a company matching renters to apartments that ended up part of Zillow. That was too easy, so now he’s decided to match people up with the right doctor. Amino came out of stealth late last year with about $20m in funding and it has acquired large data sets (including being one of the few with official access to all CMS physician data) and some complex ways to match patients to doctors–the primary one being doctors near you that have seen a lot of patients like you. Why are they in a  market that already has several well known & well funded players like Vitals, Healthgrades, Better Doctor and more? David told me that and more in this interview.

Don’t like CB Insights’ numbers? Just wait…

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Last year I got in a modest Twitter spat with Anand Sanwal the CEO of investor analytics company CB Insights. Anand writes a very amusing newsletter, has built a wildly successful business tracking venture investing (at $20-50K a client) and has recently taken on $10m in VC himself to build out his business which was already profitable. The spat was because in August 2015 (5 months ago) CB insights said that “Digital Health” investments totalled $3.5 billion in 2014. You can go read the article Stephanie Baum concocted from the Tweetstream but my point was that when CB Insights, a generalist analyst company, said that the investment in digital SMAC health was $3.5bn in 2014 they were wrong because 4 specialists (Health 2.0, Mercom, Rock Health and Startup Health) all said it was over $4.5bn.

What’s a billion between friends? Not much, but what I left unsaid until now is that if they’re 25% off the average in one sector, where are they in the other sectors they cover? But other than a few amused readers of MedCity News no one much cared and the world moved on.

Then everyone stared putting out their Q4 2015 numbers. Amusingly, but probably only to me, both Rock Health & Startup Health put out their Q4 numbers 2 weeks before the quarter/year ended, and missed a bunch of late deals! But by the time the revised numbers came in everyone was again in that middle $4 billion range and there was general agreement that funding was about flat in 2015 compared to 2014–albeit at a high level compared to what the Cinderella sector had been recently.
Health 2.0’s numbers in our report were $4.8 billion for the year, as shown on the left. (You can see more on these and some other data in our Q4 report here. In case you don’t know I co-run Health 2.0 as my day job and yes I own THCB). OK. All so far so ho-hum.

Then as the other numbers started coming out I noticed something a little odd. CB insights came out with its numbers for 2015, but something was different.
You’ll recall that I had poo-poohed their 2014 number shown as $3.477 Bn in their blog post here and displayed in the chart below. These are 2014 numbers shown in a post about investment in 2015, published in August 2015. CB Insights chart with 2014 $$ in Aug 15 And that was the number I’d started the original spat about. But when I looked at the post they released in January 2016, not only was the number for 2015 at $5.7 billion (remember Rock Health, Mercom & Health 2.0 all put it in the mid-high $4s) but the 2014 number had somehow climbed from about $3.5 billion to $5.1 billion. CB Insights chart with 2014 $$ in jan 16 Again check the January post and check the chart I’ve lifted from it below. You’d think this was a curious jump and you’d be right. But nowhere in the post does it say why the total for 2014 in August 2015 was so different from the total for 2014 in January 2016.

Of course being the troublemaker I am, I asked about this on Twitter and got a classic no reply from Anand at CB insights. sanwal
So then I sent all this info off to Stephanie Baum at Medcity News thinking that she might like to write more about it.

And a funny thing happened. Instead of writing the article I wanted her to write (i.e. this one!) She found yet another number for 2015 from CB Insights, and wrote about how they were now back in the pack with everyone else.