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Tag: Health 2.0

Health Catalyst: Dale Sanders on what’s next for analytics & big data

One of the more interesting guys in health tech is Dale Sanders who’s been data geek/CIO at multiple provider organizations (InterMountain, Northwestern, Cayman Islands), was in the nuclear weapons program in the US Air Force back in the day, and now is the product visionary at Health Catalyst. Health Catalyst is a very well-backed date warehousing and analytics company that has Kaiser, Partners, Allina and a host of other providers as its customers and investors (and has been a THCB sponsor for a while!). I’ve interviewed CEO Dan Burton a couple of times (here’s 2016) if you want to know more about the nuts and bolts of the company, but this chat with Dale at HIMSS17 got a tad more philosophical about the future of analytics–from “conference room analytics” to “embedded decision support.” I found it great fun and hope you do too!

Kyruus “load balancing” health care — Julie Yoo Interview

Continuing my interviews with various health tech players from HIMSS17, Julie Yoo MD may be one of the brightest people in health IT. She and her colleague Graham Gardner founded Kyruus to deal with one of the most complex problems in health care. The issue is the patient accessing the right doctor/provider, which is somewhat equivalent to getting everyone in the right plane to the right vacation (or in computer speak “load balancing“). While this sounds simple it’s a very complex issue with both a huge data problem (tracking which doctors are available and do what) and a rationalization issue (what patient needs what). Julie explains the problem and how Kyruus works with provider systems to fix it.

Cirrus MD — Text Connecting Your Doctor

Last week was HIMSS17, the biggest health IT conference and as per usual I ran around interviewing various techies. I’ll be releasing these interviews over the next few days and weeks–Matthew Holt

First up is a rather fun live demo I did with Cirrus MD‘s medical director Blake McKinney. Cirrus MD is a niche player in the telehealth space, and has spent the last few years building out a text-based tool which is now being rolled out in Colorado and Texas. How does it work in practice? Well funnily enough, I happened to have a medical condition that needed to be checked out by a doctor. So here’s a real impromptu demo that shows how it works and gives a good idea of the user experience.

Mobile Apps Are Reflecting the Changing Role of the Patient in the Healthcare Ecosystem

By ALINE NOIZET

The 4th edition of Trophées de la Santé Mobile took place last week in Paris which showcased the best French healthcare mobile apps in different categories.

The winning apps were clearly showing the changing role of the patient in the healthcare ecosystem. The patient is at the center, more informed, and plays an important role in his or her own health. Since the patient has a better understanding of his or her own health, they can detect a disease earlier, co-create their own treatment with the doctor, and adjust it based on the information being continuously collected through apps or wearables.

The winner of the Grand Trophée for this 2017 edition was Novi-Chek, an app that empowers and informs diabetic patients. Developed by Roche Diabetes Care France, Novi-chek is an app for patients who have recently been diagnosed with Diabetes type 1. It supports them during the 1st month of the disease, explaining what diabetes type 1 actually is, the treatments available, why they need to auto-check their glucose level, and how diabetes will impact their everyday life. The patient can also use the app to set up alarms to check glucose levels or enter useful information to track the diabetes.

Continue reading…

Esther Dyson & Rick Brush Interview at Health 2.0

Five communities. Ten years. One objective: to create business models that make better health attainable – and sustainable – for all. Esther Dyson and Rick Brush joined me at Health 2.0’s Fall Conference to talk about the exciting launch of their innovative population health initiative, The Way to Wellville.

Elation’s Kyna Fong on a new type of EMR company

There’s so much happening in the Health 2.0 world of new technology in health that it’s hard to keep up. AI, VR, AR, Blockchain–and they’re just the buzzwords keeping the VCs happy. So this year I’ve decided to try to interview more interesting new companies to keep you in the know. We’ll see how long that resolution lasts but first up is Kyna Fong, CEO of ElationHealth. Yes, she left a Stanford tenure-track professorship to start an EMR company, and no, she doesn’t sound crazy! This is an in-depth interview including a decent length demo, and it hints at how companies like hers might solve the conundrum of EMRs being necessary but impossible to use.

Jonathan Bush Interview at Health 2.0

Hello THCB Readers, I’m Jessica DaMassa. At Health 2.0’s Fall Conference, Matthew Holt and Indu Subaiya set me up with a camera crew and open access to the influencers, leaders, investors, and startups who graced the stage at this November’s meeting in Santa Clara. Over the course of two days, I asked more than 60 different interviewees from across the health continuum to share their point-of-view on the future of healthcare. Our goal was to capture the “state-of-play” in health innovation and contribute as many answers as possible to that elusive question: What’s going to be disrupted next?

All 60+ interviews are available for your guilty binge-watching pleasure on Health 2.0 TV, or you can stay tuned to THCB as we share some of the best-of-the-best. If you have any recommendations for future interviews (live or online), or want me to talk to you, I’ll be starting a longer series of interviews including showing tech demos. So please get in touch via @jessdamassa on Twitter. Thanks for watching! —Jessica DaMassa

Jonathan Bush, CEO of AthenaHealth, spoke at Health 2.0’s Fall Conference about the potential of networked medicine as a way to transform both the way healthcare is delivered and consumed. After his panel discussion, we got his take on where we can expect the next big disruption in healthcare. Here’s a hint (and a Jonathan Bush-ism to look out for): “ACO’s are kind of a training bra for becoming your own insurance company…”

Ian Morrison Interview at Health 2.0

Hi, today on THCB I’m glad to introduce Jessica DaMassa a new face who’ll be doing many more interviews in the future, focusing on thought leaders in health and health technology.–Matthew Holt

Ian Morrison is probably the best known health care futurist in America, despite being a Scottish-Canadian-Californian. He gave the keynote at last Fall’s Health 2.0 Conference, and gave his thoughts about the role of technology in the future of care delivery.

Want to help Technologies for Healthy Communities?

Health 2.0 is actively expanding Technology for Healthy Communities and looking for large healthcare organizations and foundations to help support technology adoption at a community level.

Technology for Healthy Communities is a dynamic pilot program designed to catalyze the adoption of technologies in communities. The program fosters the development of sustainable partnerships to address the social determinants of health in the under-served regions that need it the most. Over 200 innovators across the U.S. submitted applications to the program, and through curated matchmaking and access to funding, selected innovators were matched with three participating communities to conduct pilot projects.

Snapshot of the three pilots:

  • Spartanburg, SC: ACCESS Health Spartanburg, a non-profit agency primarily working with the uninsured population, is piloting with Healthify to provide community interventions for social determinants of health at the point of care. With support from Spartanburg Way to Wellville and the Mary Black Foundation, the pilot aims to address current pain points in community health care, such as the inefficiency of addressing social needs of patients and helping to make case management easier.
  • Jacksonville, FL: The City of Jacksonville and the Health Planning Council of NE Florida, with support from the Clinton Foundation is piloting with CTY to deploy its signature product, NuminaTM. With this technology, bicycle and pedestrian traffic data will be collected to assess current safety conditions and plan improvements in the built environment for residents to be more physically active.
  • Alameda County, CA: The Community Health Center Network is piloting with Welkin Health to implement a case management tool that engages members and eases current healthcare worker burden. Together, they will pilot this case management tool in four centers to help community health workers to effectively and efficiently coordinate care.

Due to the high demand from tech innovators and communities, Health 2.0 is expanding the program to new communities, tech startups and organizations who can benefit from technology adoption. By addressing the social determinants of health, the program has the potential to implement unique tech applications and address some of the most important systemic issues at the community level.

Health 2.0 is looking for partners such as foundations, large health systems and corporations who want to support pilots to test innovations in communities, interact with the fastest growing startups in the tech scene, and help create business opportunities for technology companies. Program sponsors will also have the opportunity to address local health needs by bringing exciting, new technologies to under-served regions across the U.S.

The program will focus on tools that support access to a healthy lifestyle, in categories such as:

  • Access to healthcare services
  • Food insecurity
  • Affordable housing
  • Behavioral/mental health

If you are interested in partnering with Health 2.0 to help deliver technology to communities, contact patrick@health2con.com to learn about opportunities to support the program.

Alexandra Camesas is a program manager at Catalyst @ Health 2.0

CareCloud raises $31.5m–Interview with CEO Ken Comee

Just in case you didn’t realize there still is a world going on despite last week’s election. Back in health technology, a systemic change is happening as older client-server companies (like McKesson) retreat or open up their technology (Allscripts) while investors still believe that there’s a big market for SMAC technology and cloud-based systems to run the next generation of American health care. More evidence of that today with the news that CareCloud has raised another $31.5 million to double down on the already large bet placed on it by its investors as a platform for growing medical groups. I talked to CEO Ken Comee about the company, the state of the market, and what he expects to do with the money! — Matthew Holt

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