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Tag: Facebook

Waving goodbye to Wave

Google recently announced that it was abandoning Wave, a multimedia social media collaboration tool. I’m sorry about this, as I thought it had great potential. That being said, I never used it, so perhaps I was typical. Pete Cashmere writes on CNN Tech:

Wave was perhaps the prototypical Google product: Technically advanced, incredibly ambitious and near-impossible to use.

Its demise is the canary in the coal mine for Google’s social networking plans: Facebook is destined to build the Web’s next wave, as Google continues to tread water.

Meanwhile, let’s take a look at what is going on at Facebook and elsewhere, courtesy of EduDemic. I offer #6 (regarding Facebook) and #10 (regarding Twitter) especially for those hospitals and other companies who choose to block these media on their servers, in the hope they will consider how fruitless that is.

  1. The average Facebook user has 130 friends.
  2. More than 25 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) are shared each month.
  3. Over 300,000 users helped translate the site through the translations application.
  4. More than 150 million people engage with Facebook on external websites every month.
  5. Two-thirds of comScore’s U.S. Top 100 websites and half of comScore’s Global Top 100 websites have integrated with Facebook.
  6. There are more than 100 million active users currently accessing Facebook through their mobile devices.
    Over at Twitter:

  1. Twitter’s web platform only accounts for a quarter of its users – 75% use third-party apps.
  2. Twitter gets more than 300,000 new users every day.
  3. There are currently 110 million users of Twitter’s services.
  4. Twitter receives 180 million unique visits each month.
  5. There are more than 600 million searches on Twitter every day.
  6. Twitter started as a simple SMS-text service.
  7. Over 60% of Twitter use is outside the U.S.
  8. There are more than 50,000 third-party apps for Twitter.
  9. Twitter has donated access to all of its tweets to the Library of Congress for research and preservation.
  10. More than a third of users access Twitter via their mobile phone.

Paul Levy is the President and CEO of Beth Israel Deconess Medical Center in Boston. Paul recently became the focus of much media attention when he decided to publish infection rates at his hospital, despite the fact that under Massachusetts law he is not yet required to do so. For the past three years he has blogged about his experiences in an online journal, Running a Hospital, one of the few blogs we know of maintained by a senior hospital executive.

Fake Facebook Profiles and Other Portents of the End of Times

One issue up for discussion in this evening’s free-form health care social media tweetchat was the fake Facebook page of eSara Baker, posted as a form of marketing for a company providing online health-related services (which sound like typical patient portal stuff like scheduling appointments and accessing test results).  The page prominently states: “If you haven’t uncovered our secret yet, here it is: Sara isn’t a real person.”

The identity of the company and the services provided are not at issue here.  The issue discussed in the #hcsm tweetchat was whether using social media to market a health care service through the use of a fabricated profile was unethical and/or harmful to authentic uses of social media for health care.Continue reading…

Crowd Sourcing Comes Through Again

Paul levy I have written before about the incredible power of crowd sourcing, using the reach and scope of social networking on the Internet to solve a complex problem. Here’s a play-by-play about a difficult question. It demonstrates how the asynchronous participation of many participants inevitably converges on the right answer in less than 24 hours. You just have to be patient and let the truth emerge.

I posted the following problem on Facebook:

Query — what makes some Facebook status updates stay put on the top of your page until cleared, while others appear as one-time updates?
(Yesterday at 12:22pm.)

Luba:

I think it’s an algorithm that has to do with how often you comment on other people’s posts. Facebook tries to be smart about which people you actually care about seeing. I often find it wrong and look at both top stores and most recent to get a full picture of what is going on.

Continue reading…

Palin: Obama Health Plan “Evil”

Sarah-Palin-smile The strange plot of the national debate over health reform this took another twist over the weekend, after  (now suddenly ex- Alaska governor)  Sarah Palin posted a statement on her Facebook page on Friday denouncing the Obama administration’s plan to reshape the healthcare system as “downright evil.”

In a statement referencing Ronald Reagan and the economist Thomas Sowell, Palin warned of bureaucratic “death panels” that would decide “if my parents (or yours) or my baby with Down Syndrome” are “worthy of healthcare based on their level of productivity in society.”

The full text of the post:

“As more Americans delve into the disturbing details of the nationalized
health care plan that the current administration is rushing through
Congress, our collective jaw is dropping, and we’re saying not just no,
but hell no.

The Democrats promise that a government health care system will reduce
the cost of health care, but as the economist Thomas Sowell has pointed
out, government health care will not reduce the cost; it will simply
refuse to pay the cost. And who will suffer the most when they ration
care? The sick, the elderly, and the disabled, of course. The America I
know and love is not one in which my parents or my baby with Down
Syndrome will have to stand in front of Obama’s “death panel” so his
bureaucrats can decide, based on a subjective judgment of their “level
of productivity in society,” whether they are worthy of health care.
Such a system is downright evil.

Continue reading…