Jessica DaMassa

Making Healthcare a Consumer Biz: Livongo’s Glen Tullman on his New Book & IPO Rumors

“If we just shop for healthcare like we shop for everything else…we would take care of a lot of the problems…”

So says Glen Tullman, CEO of Livongo, a very hot startup with a chronic condition management platform that has been batting away IPO rumors since earlier this year when it closed a $52.M round funded by existing investors.

Glen has just literally written the book on consumerizing healthcare and stopped by to talk about it at the HIMSS TV set on location at Health 2.0’s Fall Conference (where I was guest hosting interviews!)

Called On Our Terms the book tries to push us toward thinking about the buying-and-selling of healthcare the same way we’d think about buying-and-selling anything else. Glen argues it’s possible if we start looking at healthcare as an ‘information business’ – and pivot our thinking and our business models accordingly to provide greater access to that information.

Are we as consumers ready for all this responsibility? Is the healthcare system ready for us and our purchasing power? Is anyone doing this right?? Glen fires back with some strong examples of where he already sees this working, and gets real about who’s in trouble if they don’t pivot and pivot fast. (We’re looking at you, payers.)

Bonus Intel: Will Glen take Livongo to an IPO like he did Allscripts? It’s a multi-million dollar question…

Get a glimpse of the future of healthcare by meeting the people who are going to change it. Find more WTF Health interviews here or check out www.wtf.health. Filmed at Health 2.0’s Fall Conference in Santa Clara, September 2018.

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pjnelson

When the internet began to progressively offer access to health information around 1990, I had been a practicing Primary Physician for about 15 years. Slowly, I realized two attributes about my relationships with the patients in our office. Slowly, there were many patients who would knew more about the research-related details of their health than I did. Initially wary of these encounters, the real basis for their knowledge was to be informed as a basis to explore my view of their health and its dimensions. We periodically offered a hand-out to our patients as a basis for exploring HEALTH knowledge… Read more »