Uncategorized

Do You Care About My Health, Or Just Think I’m Gross? Be Honest.

 

Hi. I’m fat. I’m what most people call an in-betweenie—I have a heavy build, I wear plus sizes, my stomach poofs out, I have folds of fat along my back, I have chubby arms and legs. I can still buy clothes off the rack at a lot of stores, though.

Don’t rush to tell me I’m not ‘that kind’ of fattie or you’re ‘not talking about [me]‘ when you’re going on about how much you worry for fat people, though. We all know that you’re thinking of me, that when you think of fat people, my double chin comes to mind, my wobbling upper arms, my thighs broad in my jeans, my big ass. I’m fat. It’s okay. You can say it. I don’t have a problem with it.

I have a lot of issues with my body, but my size isn’t really one of them. It is what it is. The reasons I’m fat are complicated and not really your business. And yeah, I am unhealthy, and the reasons for that aren’t your business either, although I know you want to rush to assume that I’m unhealthy because I’m fat.

I don’t have an obligation to be healthy, actually, and I don’t have an obligation to rush to assure you that I’m a ‘good fatty’ with great cholesterol and good scores on other health indicators allegedly related to weight. I don’t have an obligation to tell you that fat isn’t correlated with health because I shouldn’t have to justify the existence of fat people by informing you that you don’t understand how fat bodies work, and you’re not familiar with the latest studies on fatness, morbidity and mortality, health indicators, and social trends.

Because fat people have a right to exist, healthy or unhealthy, and this whole argument about health is a red herring. It suggests that if only fat people could prove that fat and health aren’t coupled, they’d be okay. Society is just concerned for us—worried that we’ll be felled too soon, taking our glorious minds into the ground with us to rot, all because we were fat and we refused to take personal responsibility for our fatness.

Here’s the thing, though: fat people have a right to exist, no matter what their health status is, and their health status is both not your business and not evidence to be used when determining whether they should be found wanting. Fatness is just a characteristic, one with which many people have a complex relationship because it’s socially loaded. Your judgement about fat has not been requested, nor is it required.


Let me tell you something about being fat: we know we’re fat, okay? We are in fact aware of the size noted in the tags of our clothes, we know how we occupy furniture. Sometimes we crack jokes about being fat because, well, sometimes being fat is funny. Sometimes being fat is fun. Sometimes we know people feel uncomfortable because we’re fat and we want to set them at ease. Sometimes we feel tremendous pressure to get people to treat us like human beings so we play the jolly fat person role to make ourselves into someone you have to engage with, rather than an object you can loathe.

And we spend our whole lives being told that everyone is worried for us. Don’t we know fat is unhealthy? Aren’t we worried about dying early? Have we talked to a doctor about our fat? Have we considered diet and exercise? How will you ever find a partner? You aren’t actually the first person to ask us any of these questions, and you probably won’t be the last. Because the thing is, when you’re fat, you know, your body seems to become part of the public commons, something for everyone to comment on. You are no longer yourself, an autonomous person who is allowed to drift through the world doing your own thing.

Here’s the thing: I think, between you and me, that you can drop the facade. You’re not worried about my health. If the health of strangers was a valid concern for you, you’d be more careful about where you blew your cigarette smoke. You wouldn’t have almost run down that skateboarder waiting to cross the curb. You’d help that poor woman struggling to load those heavy sacks of chicken scratch at the feed store. You’d cover your mouth when you cough to reduce the spread of infectious organisms.

This isn’t about my health as an individual, about your concerns for what society might lose if I drop dead. This is about the fact that you think I’m kind of gross. It’s okay. You can say it. You’re socialised to think that fat people are disgusting, to find my fat rolls hideous. You’re taught to cringe at the sight of my belly jiggling in a tight shirt, to believe that double chins are ugly and unpleasant to look at.

You’re taught that people like me are slow and stupid, that we don’t deserve to be treated like human beings. You’re taught that fat, on its own, is intrinsically, inherently bad. It takes a lot of work to overcome social conditioning, and often people try to dodge their conditioning by hiding it with something else. You want to tell me that you don’t care about my weight, you’re just ‘concerned.’

But you do care about my weight. My weight is the problem. I’m fat. That upsets you. The fact that I don’t care that I’m fat and don’t particularly care what you think about my fat upsets you even more. I’m breaking the rules. I’d say I’m sorry, but I’m not.

Be honest with yourself, if no one else: you’re bothered by fatness because it disgusts you, not because you’re worried for the health of your fellow humans. Now push yourself a little harder, please: why does fat disgust you?

S.E. Smith is a writer and editor who lives in Northern California. This post originally appeared on Smith’s personal website, This Ain’t Livin’, on October 18, 2013.

Livongo’s Post Ad Banner 728*90

12
Leave a Reply

10 Comment threads
2 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
10 Comment authors
Kim S.WriterGirlMD as HELLNone of your d*** businesslegacyflyer Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Kim S.
Guest

The truth is I’ve seen the end game of obesity and it isn’t pretty – diabetes, congestive heart failure, bones that fracture just under a patient’s weight. Granted, many of these patients are morbidly obese, but they are unhealthy and unable to live good, productive lives. I’m overweight and I know I should lose some pounds just for myself and my own health. Being fat isn’t okay if you want to be healthy especially as you get older.

WriterGirl
Guest
WriterGirl

The ideas in this article were very well articulated, and having been fat myself, I completely concur that a disproportionate number of well-wishers – those who express concern about our weight – have a bias that they aren’t owning up to. That said, I can tell you that once I lost 40 pounds (believe me, it was no easy task), I was able to ditch my blood pressure medication, my cholesterol medication, my asthma medication, and my OTC antacids. All that medication and the extra doctor’s visits cost money – a lot of it. And not just my money, but… Read more »

None of your d*** business
Guest
None of your d*** business

I believe the theme of SE’s article articulated very clearly that, her business is her business and no one else’s. For all the busy bodies who believe they can control all aspects of our individual existence under the umbrella of the “public good”, many of us still consider what we do to be none of your D*** business.

legacyflyer
Guest
legacyflyer

I believe that you are the owner of your body. You can do with it as you wish. I am a physician, I can give you advice as to what will make you more healthy, but you need to put this advice into practice yourself – or not. The Nanny State has already encroached on what we can do with our own bodies; laws on drug use, seat belt and helmet laws, the persecution of smokers, and now the war on fat people. I am a scuba diver, fly an experimental airplane and ride a scooter without a helmet. F… Read more »

Saurabh Jha
Guest
Saurabh Jha

It’s your call, it’s your life, SE Smith.

Some people scuba dive. Some people climb mountains. It’s all risky.

Enjoy your time on this planet in the way you deem fit.

Above us only sky, as Lennon said.

Peter1
Guest
Peter1

If I look disparagingly at very fat people it’s because I think they selfishly over indulge and are just lazy. Just the same way I do not think highly of people who wear lots of flashy jewelry or furs or who are covered in tattoos or who never clean up there yards or fix their houses. Are fat poor people looked at worse than fat rich people – I bet they are, but I hold the same opinion either way – it’s just the impression that the world is all about them. As for societal consequences that cost us all… Read more »

Perpelexed
Guest
Perpelexed

I’m curious, S.E. Smith, as to why you were prompted to post your ruminations on this site. I’ve read little here to suggest any of the regular posters would care that you’re fat. Some may argue that you should pay more for insurance because of all the complications your weight will eventually cause. Others may advise you to lose the weight to improve your own quality of life. But I doubt anyone would point at the fatty and laugh like this is a middle-school playground.

m25
Guest
m25

I can’t pretend to know the experiences you’ve had and the responses you’ve gotten due to societal understanding of normal weight. But I do know myself, and I know that only the worst of the worst would cause me to write as biting and acerbic a piece as this one. I’m genuinely sorry to you for whatever has come your way. I’m not fat. I may suffer from some light version of healthism instead (see here for more detail: https://thehealthcareblog.com/blog/2013/12/04/healthism-the-new-puritanism/). I know why I’m like that–so obsessed with my physical wellness. For beginners, it keeps me sane, relieves stress. The… Read more »

MD as HELL
Guest
MD as HELL

Yes it is bad.

Quit preachiing. It is only to make you feel good.

Don't Go Back to Rockville
Guest

I don’t think you’re gross. But I do think you’re wrong ..

What you’re missing is that you’re putting your own life at risk

You may be well educated enough to get the health issues involved , but the fact is that many of the people who die of obesity related health problems simply do not know the facts

MD as HELL
Guest
MD as HELL

His life.

He knows.

It is none of anyone else’s business.

Quit fear-mongering.

userlogin
Editor

I’m a doctor and I come from a family of diabetics. I love to eat and come from a culture that loves to eat and believes that (America’s idea of ) being thin is a mark of being overly skinny and unhealthy. I am lectured on a daily basis about how I need to gain weight. I don’t throw stones. Either at my patients or generally in society. Mostly because I have come face to face with my own innumerable weaknesses and frailties. I am far from perfect and I know it. I don’t exercise regularly or aggressively enough, I… Read more »