THCB

Supreme Court Upholds Affordable Care Act

By THCB STAFF

Defying predictions that the Obama administration would suffer a landmark political defeat, the US Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act this morning. The implications for healthcare for the 2012 election are obviously nothing less than staggering.

What will the landmark legislation mean for the healthcare industry? For heath IT companies? For hospitals and health insurers?

We’ll be posting reactions from THCB analysts over the course of the day and in the days to come. In the meantime, if you have an opinion on the ruling, post your comments in the thread below.

If you can’t wait, you can download the ruling here in pdf format.

Livongo’s Post Ad Banner 728*90

Categories: THCB

Tagged as: ,

34
Leave a Reply

22 Comment threads
12 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
19 Comment authors
MGWalt Longrososusilobev M.D.MD as HELL Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
MG
Guest
MG

Guess where I don’t see this as fundamentally changing things because of how the ruling was worded or provide long-term certainty. An overwhelming majority of 26 states that were a part of the suit will continue to drag their feet implementing ACA & do little/nothing until the Nov. election.

Won’t know until after the results in Nov. whether or not this will really mean something over the intermediate term.

Peter1
Guest
Peter1

Once the mandate takes affect and many, if not most, uninsured start buying insurance what will be the effect on other industries as that disposable income is now spent on health care? And when those insured get sick and have to pay co-pays and deductibles that will be another sucking sound away from the rest of the economy – subsidies aside. I agree with a mandate, I don’t agree we should be forced to pay for the most expensive system in the world. I too don’t see providers or insurance companies with their lobbyists and SuperPacs being forced to trim… Read more »

rososusilo
Guest

today, healthcare costs are very expensive, I agree with the government’s decision, if it makes us better

bev M.D.
Guest
bev M.D.

Natasha, you make good points, especially about insurance companies, but one cannot move to a completely ‘non profit’ system such as single payor, without creating a demoralized workforce obsessed with the yearly budget allocations (which, inevitably, continue to go down – see UK, Canada, et al). The one fact Americans must accept is that there is no perfect health care system in the world. This law is simply an iteration toward a system which is better than what we have now, where we spend the most and get the least. As for insurance companies, I have never believed they belong… Read more »

Natasha Deonarain
Guest

The problem is not what it may seem at first. We love to keep our myopic vision intact when it comes to healthcare in this country. The problem is that for-profit self-interest is not out of the equation. So in the future, not only will be we mandated to pay for our own health premiums – which in a fair system should be capped at less than 10% of what they are now – we will be paying collectively for a growing sector which cannot afford to pay the cost of rising health premiums. Do you think the “mandate” amount… Read more »

Trenchpress
Guest

The GOP should blame itself for Obamacare since they started mandates, so the GOP WON.
http://trenchpress.com/?p=14808

It is like a RNC made a big hole in a big boat since it got paid to do so, and instead of plugging the hole, they would rather take some water out with a bucket. The DNC does not like the water but prefers it open since it gets sand, fish, and other junk come in though the hole, while the RNC disagrees. The boat will eventually sink and take the 2 of them with them.

Dr. Mike
Guest
Dr. Mike

I’m not sure why I should be happy that a 64 y/o widow earning $47,000 with an employer that does not offer insurance should have as her only option a $10,000 policy on the exchange whilst a 65 y/o widow in the same job has Medicare.

MD as HELL
Guest
MD as HELL

Timing is everything.

John
Guest
John

For a good brief post on what this all means. Check out one of the nation’s leading economists, Doug Holtz-Eakin, and his analysis of what Obamacare holds for Americans: http://bit.ly/MYjF9A

Insurance Genie
Guest
Insurance Genie

How does Obamacare affect insurance brokers as myself? From what I’m reading I can’t tell if its good or bad for business at this point.

doc101
Guest

As a physician, I am not sure how I feel about the series of changes coming. Actually, I do know how I feel and I won’t print what I have to say. But then I stop and think about it. Here are the problems: 1. Workload & Transparency – Most doctors are fatigued. We feel like we’re working harder and longer, with less resources, less autonomy, less respect and with more paperwork and administrative responsibilities. For ratings organizations to show every outcome, even when I don’t always control it, and to show it publicly and ‘rate’ me is almost the… Read more »

Peter1
Guest
Peter1

Are you a PCP or specialist? Because the “system” treats the two very differently – especially on pay. As far as the financial goes welcome to the real world of ordinary workers whose real wages and wealth have not progressed in 10 years.

BobbyG
Guest

Mitt Romney just commented on his position:

http://www.bgladd.com/MittStandsByWhateverHeSaid.mp3

Peter1
Guest
Peter1

So, if it’s considered a tax then can people who pay the ‘tax” (penalty) claim coverage without buying insurance? After all a tax represents a cost to provide a service – such as Medicare.

BobbyG
Guest

“claim coverage without buying insurance?”
__

I wouldn’t think so. Just continue to show up at the ER, though.

Peter1
Guest
Peter1

Well If I show up to the ER I won’t expect a bill, I’ll just present my “tax paid” receipt. Maybe this will open up Medicare as rbaer comments. Having separate Medicare/caid is just stupid.

rbaer
Guest
rbaer

Not sure what you mean, but I wonder whether medicare expansion is considered by the white house. IMHO, a leaner, more rational (evidence based) medicare with less procedure favoring fee schedule should replace old medicare and medicaid and would make many voters and a majority of docs happy.

Walt Long
Guest
Walt Long

The “tax” does indeed represent a service…a service that has always been provided to them at no cost previously. It’s the assurance that when they show up at the ER they will be treated, only now they’re paying a nominal fee instead of forcing the rest of the taxpayers to pay for their health care gratis. The tax, like the mandate, is merely a means of taking a little responsibility for your life, like car insurance.