Matthew Holt

Obama-cares (if you’re under 26)

CDC data just in, reported by Jonathan Cohn at THR, suggests that the impact of allowing young people to stay on their parent’s insurance (or as Michael Cannon would say, forcing employers to cover dependents up to the age of 26) is having a big impact. Up to 2.5 million adults under the age of 26 have moved into coverage. Frankly I’m not surprised. There’s always been a huge group of uninsured young adults moving between high school and college and the workforce. And if you hadn’t noticed, there’s a recession on and good jobs with insurance are hard to find. I know at least three young adults working in the semi-contingent labor force who are on their parents’ insurance. Of course they’d better hope they don’t turn 26 before 2014. But even this little gain is something the Democrats need to punch home about the Republicans: Those bastards want to take your kid’s insurance away! And they do.

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IBDMOMHelen Recent comment authors
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Helen
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Helen

Thanks for the info IBDMOM.

IBDMOM
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IBDMOM

I am the parent of a teenager who, without the ACA, is one of the “automatic denials” for individual healthcare coverage. You can see a list of diagnoses that typically make a person uninsurable here — search for “High-Risk Pool Definition of Pre-Existing Conditions”: http://www.healthcare.gov/law/resources/reports/preexisting.html This is because my son was diagnosed with something bad at the age of 13–kind of the opposite of the “Young Invincibles”. His only option for healthcare coverage, without the ACA, is a high-risk pool or whatever he can get through employment, when he is old enough, and presuming his medical situation even allows him… Read more »

Helen
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Helen

The options regarding how to handle those first entering (or trying to enter) the workforce puzzles me. Just last weekend I heard a (50-something) friend that is between jobs lament about the cost of health insurance-both her own health insurance and the cost of insurance for her children (both of which are in their 20s and both of which are employed, but not in jobs that include health benefits so their mother currently pays for their insurance). A few years ago, I moved to New York City after living in Europe for several years at the age of 28 and… Read more »