Physicians

10,000 US physicians have something to say and we’re not wasting time.

Today, as Congress returns to session, all 100 Senators will be listening to physicians on SERMO when they deliver the “US Physician’s Appeal” on Capitol Hill.   Wasting no time, my physician colleagues and I, armed with the over 10,000 signatures will deliver the Appeal directly to lawmakers, requesting them to include us in national health reform strategy.

We are pledging our commitment to true healthcare reform focused on the real sources of spiraling, bureaucratic costs and by doing this on day one of Congress’ return, we are telling them that true healthcare reform will only succeed IF:

  1. Tort and malpractice laws are reformed;
  2. Billing is streamlined and pricing made transparent, ending systemic support of the AMA owned billing codes (CPT Codes);
  3. The insurance industry is reformed; and
  4. Payment systems are simplified so they align with the growing need for preventive medicine.

US physicians have a unique perspective on the systemic changes needed because we are on the forefront of care every day-in between patients, hospitals, Medicare, Medicaid, and insurance companies.  Physicians more than any stakeholder group understand the need for pragmatic reform, not politically negotiated reform and we must be included for solutions to work.

With the Appeal, the SERMO community is seeking participation from every member of the US Senate to work with us to bridge a communication gap dominated by the influence of special interest groups; inviting policy makers to engage directly with us by posting questions, discussion topics and blog entries directly into the largest physicians-only online network, in an electronic online forum to discuss ideas and developments in the healthcare reform debate, in real time.  Today, in Washington, we’ll formally deliver the “US Physician’s Appeal” for lawmaker’s consideration to all 100 Senator’s offices. If you can’t be there, find us onlineat http://www.sermo.com/reform where you can sign the appeal; and then make your opinion known by getting in touch with your Senators by visiting www.senate.gov and click on “Senators”. We have strength in numbers and if the physician voice is loud enough, it will be heard.

Dr. Daniel Palestrant is the CEO of SERMO and was recently named one of the country’s “50 Most Powerful Physicians” by Modern Physician, and Business Week has named SERMO as one of the “Top 50 Tech Startups” globally. SERMO is where over 110,000 physicians are leveraging the power of social media to drive better patient care and have their voices heard.

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chevy chase pharmacygsGary LdrRobtrblmkr Recent comment authors
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chevy chase pharmacy
Guest

What happen now? Can you provide more information with us? Updates please..

gs
Guest
gs

Responding to Johnson: Mr Johnson, will you stop whinning please ! Insurance companies, Doctors and lawyers combined together have created this healthcare mess. Why are you ( Doctors ) Letting the insurance companies control you so tightly ? If all of you had the courage to stand up to the insurance companies , you would be boycotting the worst ones in the bunch and the rest of them would get the message. Tell me something. … and you politicians listenup too…… I own and operate two national brand retail outlets. Our politicians mandate that every thing we have in our… Read more »

johnson
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johnson

Since when did we become socialists and let the government decide whats best for us, what we do and how we do it? I work hard, really hard for my money and I would like to spend it on my family not helping other people pay their mortgages to help clean up congresses mess. Fixing salaries is a dumb idea because there will be no incentive to work hard. I agree with restructuring the payment system but not with fixed salaries. Once the government does this its a slippery slope. Then they might as well put everyone on a fixed… Read more »

twa
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twa

MD as HELL: tort reform has its place, that I’m not argueing per se. But I suspect it won’t change behavior (or reduce total costs) as much as you think. And to use your football player – perhaps the problem isn’t giving him the CT “just in case”, perhaps the problem is a system where each CT scan carries a seperate cost to a payer. The “cost” of each CT scan itself is essentially artificial. We have constructed a set of charges around each scan to help pay for the piece of equipment and people’s time in a fee-for-service, “piece… Read more »

MD as HELL
Guest
MD as HELL

twa,
It will make a difference if I don’t have to aderess BS as if it were an emergency.

twa
Guest
twa

This is a very typical “conversation” which in the end totally misses the point. Its not tort reform, or primary care, or salary vs. FFS or evidence-based medicine or or or etc. that will make a difference. It’s not about any one of these things. Its about systems of care that end up addressing all of them. We know from Wennberg/Fisher et. al. that there are high performing areas. But the physicians don’t want to talk about this. Moving towards higher performing systems requires them to practice differently, organize differently, and be paid differently (and to accept some accountability). And… Read more »

MD as HELL
Guest
MD as HELL

“The situation calls for a negative CAT scan.”, a concept that clearly illustrates the other side of evidence-based medicine and the defensive posture necessary to continue to survive as a doctor in this tort environment. It is not losing a suit that is the heartache in malpractice, but defending a suit. It will take years. It does not require daily time, but it requires daily contemplation. It is always there, the spectre of events to come. Depositions. Arbitration. Trial. In the past doctors have folded up like lawn chairs, settling suits just to get it behind them. It really amounts… Read more »

Gary L
Guest

In a recent hearing that Docs 4 patient care attended they were told that physicians do not participate enough in the political process. Interesting remark, so where is the AMA? Maybe they are cozying up with their political cronies, and our lobbyists do not represent us. The senator stated that individual physicians must participate AS INDIVIDUALS. It is okay to have multiple organizations representing us. THE POWER OF ONE is us as individuals…Members of SERMO should also look at Docs4patients.org

drRob
Guest
drRob

Also, thinking through the numbers further, it struck me that the approximately 7% of physicians who denied ever ordering tests for “defensive” reasons is an awfully similar number to the 5.3% Greg Pawelski cites (as the perpetrators of the majority of cases of “malpractice”). This led me to wonder — could this be the same group of doctors? Is this 5-7% of doctors practicing substandard medicine, and thus appropriately being sued more often? Or, is this 5-7% really practicing reasonable medicine, and getting hit with lawsuits, because they can look at a patient, feel 99.99% comfortable they’ve got the right… Read more »

drRob
Guest
drRob

I think trblmkr hit the nail on the head. It isn’t the SOLE reason for ordering the test. Beyond the percentage chance of a given outcome, it also is an issue of what rate of bad outcome are you willing to accept? Finding out what is causing a set of symptoms is not always straightforward — it’s weighing the likely vs. the unlikely, the minimally problematic vs. the devastating. So doing a test to make sure it isn’t something trivial is useless; doing a test to make sure it isn’t something fatal As MD as HELL pointed out, the current… Read more »

trblmkr
Guest

“I am a poor doctor, frightened by the prospect of litigation, and it is for this reason, and this reason alone, that I might order an unecessary test/hospital stay/medication.” “Furthermore, as much as it pains me, I have had to turn away ‘high risk’patients because of this fear. Don’t ask me how I knew they were ‘high risk’ without seeing them.” Scenario: Patient comes in with an ailment, the Doctor thinks the cause is most likely X but there is a certain per cent chance the cause is Y. What is the cut off point for ordering the test for… Read more »

trblmkr
Guest

All types of enemies, and even some friends, of healthcare reform love to cite the alleged heavy cost burden malpractice insurance puts on our poor, poor doctors. They tell us this evil plight is two-headed, the cost of malpractice payouts themselves and the darker but supposedly ‘indirect cost’ of , oooh, ‘defensive medicine’. ‘Defensive medicine’ is when doctors, so afeared of evil litigious patients, order uneccesary tests and procedures ‘just in case’ the patient later falls ill and claims the doctor comitted a ‘sin of omission’ by not finding what ailed him/her. The other example is when doctors hold off… Read more »

Jerry
Guest

Hope everyone’s happy seeing a mid-level nurse-practitioner with two years of training.
Anything’s better than a burned-out physician with a bad attitude.
Q – What do you call the person who graduates last in their medical school class?
A – ‘Doctor.’

dilligaf
Guest
dilligaf

Keep on beating up primary care docs with more work, less compensation, and give them no relief from tort lawyers, patients with severe “entitlement-itis”…and good luck finding a doc in a few years. I happen to be one, and will be retiring as soon as I can…hopefully in five years or less. Primary docs are leaving in droves. Hope everyone’s happy seeing a mid-level nurse-practitioner with two years of training.

spike
Guest
spike

Based on the recommendations of SERMO, it sounds like they’re on the same page as the AMA. “Give us everything we want and thank us for letting you give it to us”. So which doctors aren’t like this?