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Trackers – you can use Zume yourself at last (and others too)

In this piece I’m slightly pulling CEO Rajiv Metha’s chain (but he’s an Arsenal fan so he can take it). At any rate the Zume Life beta program is open and it works on the iPhone (as previewed at Health 2.0 in October. Zume has received the kind of publicity that tiny starts-up dream about (articles in the WSJ, NY Times et al) while only having a tiny number of people in pilots actually using the service. So it’'s good to know that the rest of us can actually use it and see what the fuss is about.

Meanwhile Zume is by no means alone in the market for lightweight trackers of health, diet and everyday activities. Health 2.0 “Launch” star thecarrot.com has a nifty interface to the iPhone designed in from the start, and has been adding different trackers to its platform at a ripping rate. For a pure platform approach that you can track basically anything at all on, it’s really neat.

Sensei is
a subsidiary of Humana that focuses on weight loss and has some really
interesting features allowing you to customize a diet plan to yourself
& take it mobile. Purpleteal is focusing on drugs and medication adherence (and isn’t quite in public beta yet).

And Adam Bosworth’s Keas has
some very interesting combinations of all of the above—again going into
beta soon (although you may have seen the preview at Health 2.0) This
is an unscientific smattering, but there’s certainly something stirring
and it’ll be interesting to see if trackers/reminders and “life
managers” take off in health care.

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simeAlexandra Carmichael Recent comment authors
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sime
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nice comments your blog.

Alexandra Carmichael
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CureTogether (http://www.curetogether.com) has also just launched basic health tracking in addition to its chronic condition research. The more data people have about themselves, the better they can understand their bodies and live their healthiest life.