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POLITICS: The Crystal Ball – Healthcare reform in California

I’m up over at Spot-on discussing why the opinion of 32 corn farmers in Iowa may not matter quite as much for health insurance as what’s going on in my fair state. The piece is called: A Californian Crystal Ball.

As ever come back here to comment.

Pretty much anyone interested in U.S. politics is focused today on
what 32 corn farmers in the middle of the country have to say about the
20-some people currently hoping to run the world by becoming President
of the United States.

And while health care concerns have figured in many of the
conversations the U.S. political press has had – or overheard – with
Iowa Caucus voters, it’s been a wild holiday season for California’s
health care system. The impact on what type of health care reform
legislation will eventually come to national attention is probably just
as great.

On Christmas Eve a California appeals court unanimously decided that
the way insurers have been practicing in the state for many years is illegal.
The case involving retroactive cancellation of policies was one that
the nice well-behaved non-profit California Blue Shield had fought in
the courts while its aggressive for-profit competitor, Wellpoint’s Blue
Cross unit, had settled.

Blue Shield maintained it had the right to retroactively cancel
those insurance policies for which it says that policy-holders had lied
on their applications. At first the series of stories, which started coming out last year and ended up making an appearance in Michael Moore’s Sicko,
seemed cut and dried. People who’d received expensive care were having
their insurance canceled for pre-existing conditions that they’d either
clearly disclosed on their applications, or couldn’t possibly have been
expected to remember. Meanwhile the behavior of the health plans was
shown to be particularly cynical, with one, HealthNet, actually paying out bonuses to staff doing "recissions" based on how many expensive policy holders they kicked off their rolls.Continue reading this post o ver at Spot On.com

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markPeterChrisGeorge Barlow Recent comment authors
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The people above who are ” pushing ” this health insurance are not welcome here. There is a real problem and this person who is trying to sell something, please go away. Let’s talk about these ” so-called ” great Insurance sites. First of all if you don’t know what “bait and switch” is go to any of these so called Insurance sites, you will not get the rates they claim! They only take the most healthy people, mostly young, and with no prior health problems. Also you cannot use a rejection letter from any of these internet insurance scam… Read more »

Peter
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Peter

Posted by Chris:
“Universal healthcare is cumbersome and inefficient.”
Define please.

Chris
Guest

That’s the problem. Health insurance should remain a privatized field. Universal healthcare is cumbersome and inefficient. If you are looking for a site with good a good interface and the lowest rates, visit http://www.quotebroker.com. I found them by chance and they worked great for me.

Chris
Guest

That’s the problem. Health insurance should remain a privatized field. Universal healthcare is cumbersome and inefficient. If you are looking for a site with good a good interface and the lowest rates, visit http://www.quotebroker.com. I found them by chance and they worked great for me.

George Barlow
Guest
George Barlow

Hi Matthew:
It gets even more interesting if you consider leading California health insurance inititatives in light of recent federal actions. While it seems clear that insurance is a state-legislated activity, I would have said so were clean air emission standards until a few weeks ago. There is very likely to be significantly more pressure to create and administer healthcare legislation and policy at the federal level than ever before. Maybe those 32 corn farmers are more powerful than you imagine…