Uncategorized

HEALTH2.0: More doctor rating–this time it’s Wellpoint & Zagats

So Zagats, which is the best known old world ratings guide in the restaurant business, is making a move into health care. And it’s doing it with the biggest blues plan Wellpoint.

So there’s likely to be quite a bit of cynicism about this. After all, why should anyone use a health plan site to rate doctors rather than an independent one, and for that matter is Wellpoint going to let its customers rate it? I can think of a few who won’t rate it so highly!

But beyond the cynicism, it’s clear that some form of ratings is coming fast. And plans might as well get into the game somehow, although given the lack of trust they have in the market, my guess is that an independent ratings company is more likely to succeed. And there are lots of those around. Perhaps the question is whether it’ll be a guide known best for restaurants like Yelp, a general health care site which allows ratings like Revolution or Vimo, or whether a specialist one that just rates doctors like RateMDs or CareSeek.

Quick add: On the panel at Connected Health, Henry DePhillips, ex MedDecision now with Medem says– consumers not going to
rate costs or quality—so that Wellpoint/Zagats are missing the point!

Livongo’s Post Ad Banner 728*90

Categories: Uncategorized

Tagged as:

10
Leave a Reply

10 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
10 Comment authors
DarylDavidGale Wilson-SteeleSteve Feldman, MD, PhDRod Solar Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Daryl
Guest
Daryl

I read somewhere that Well Point offered mdnationwide.org 3.8 million (cash) for it databases, and proprietary software. Yet, MDNationwide Inc turn”ed down the offer. Here’s what the founder “Hugo Gallegos said in a statement, “Our organization is so far ahead as far as technologies implemented into our Infrastructure, we have been developing our specialization since 2000.” It’s fairly inexpensive to put a site together, and string some doctor credential information databases, and rely on traffic so that you can charge for advertisement space. Thus, you allow patients to rate doctors based on how (bedside manner) nice they are, that’s what… Read more »

David
Guest

Consumers need to take back control of their patient satisfaction, and as in other industries, only the consumer can effect change. So in the case of MyDocHub.com, patients rate their doctor based on waiting room times, total wait time including the time in the patient room with the doctor, and a simple rating of 1 to 5, 5 being the highest on how satisfied they were with that appointment. The ratings are averaged out, so one poor score does not hurt the doctor, but on the other hand, various poor ratings may indicate poor performance by the doctor, since the… Read more »

Gale Wilson-Steele
Guest

It’s not surprising that physicians are uncomfortable with the idea of others “rating” them. After all, what do others know about how well they provide healthcare? This, actually, is very similar to the reactions professors first had on RateMyProfessors, where professors protested that students only cared about whether their tests were fair, and scoffed saying that the “kids” knew nothing about the professors’ degrees, research projects, etc. In the minds of those who stood at the lectern, it was about academic qualifications; for those in the seats, it was about staying awake. Today, professors are much more comfortable with the… Read more »

Steve Feldman, MD, PhD
Guest

Patient satisfaction is only one element– albeit an important one– of medical quality. I asked a group of doctors what they thought the average doctor’s patient satisfaction score would be. On a scale of 0-10, they gave answers in the range of 4-6. The actual median score of doctors (with 20 or more ratings) on the http://www.DrScore.com online patient satisfaction survey website is 9.5 out of 10! Even doctors don’t realize what a great job we are doing, tending to see each others’ failures and rarely each others’ happy patients. Doctors don’t need to try to prohibit patients from rating… Read more »

Rod Solar
Guest

This rating has been going on for years in the UK, specifically in regards laser eye surgeons and clinics. Have a look at http://www.lasik-eyes.co.uk The site is composed of thousands of comments, associated with 1 to 5 star ratings, and average price per procedure paid.

AmyT of www.diabetesmine.com
Guest

I have some thoughts on this whole scoring business from the patient perspective. See http://www.diabetesmine.com/2007/10/the-zagats-guid.html .

Ken
Guest
Ken

I’m not so quick to dismiss the Wellpoint/Zagat’s initiative. Look at it from the average consumer’s perspective – is the doctor accessible, does he or she communicate, is the office a comfortable place to visit, and do people TRUST the doctor? Those are all things that would resonate with the average consumer (they certainly do with me), and they are all things that the patient is able to pass judgement on. And in some ways they’re not all that different that what CAHPS asks about physicians. How is a patient able to evaluate cost when rates are set by payors… Read more »

MG
Guest
MG

“Quick add: On the panel at Connected Health, Henry DePhillips, ex MedDecision now with Medem says– consumers not going to rate costs or quality—so that Wellpoint/Zagats are missing the point!” This comment is kind of misguided. The point of the Wellpoint/Zagats survey is to solely focus on elements of patient satisfaction related to their physician. According the press release, it will consist of a 30-point scale in which patients evaluate their physician on trustworthiness, communication skills, availability and medical office environment. Not a single measure where customers directly attempt to measure quality or cost. Just go to the AHRQ website… Read more »

T Young, Ph.D.
Guest
T Young, Ph.D.

While I think this is a fantastic babystep, it is just a babystep and it isn’t in step with the direction of the web as a whole (increasingly open systems). The ratings are only available within a closed system, accesible only to Wellpoint members. This doesn’t help folks who are choosing their physician before they actually have an insurance card (and can actually get into the plan website) and it certainly doesn’t help anyone else. All that aside, while not showing any data until there are at least 10 ratings is good data practice, it isn’t necessarily good web practice.… Read more »

renata
Guest

I totally agree with Henry DePhillips from the Connected Health panel.