13
Leave a Reply

13 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
10 Comment authors
Electrolux servisiNel HarrisonJacob AzizaMike Feehanscott Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Electrolux servisi
Guest

Mike,
Yes, good point about the ambiguity of the phrase “account for.” Physicians are certainly the centerpiece of healthcare spending when you factor in what they prescribe, treatments they recommend and hospital admits they make.

Nel Harrison
Guest

The Golden Years
This folk song written by Eric Rech in 2007 reflects the changing of attitudes among the baby boomer generations about the governments ability to care of them as they reach their golden years. Originally titled “Granny Bong Hit” the name was changed to “The Golden Years” to appeal to a wider audience. In the 2008 elections the term “Universal Health Care” will become center stage only dwarfed by the current war in Iraq.
A link to the song can be found here.
http://www.subcampus.com/promo/grannybonghit.mp3
Artist: Nel Harrison
Album: In The Beginning
Song Title: The Golden Years
Release Date: 2007

Jacob Aziza
Guest
Jacob Aziza

Private insurance may have only a 5% margin, but they are not the only for-profit in the healthcare system.
The majority of hospitals are now for profit. All US drug companies are for profit. I don’t know the profit margins for these industrires, but assuning a reasonably low 5% for each, a trip to the hospital for a prescription costs the consumer 15% more in profits to various companies over what they would pay in a government (non-profit) run healthcare system.

jd
Guest
jd

Mike,
Yes, good point about the ambiguity of the phrase “account for.” Physicians are certainly the centerpiece of healthcare spending when you factor in what they prescribe, treatments they recommend and hospital admits they make.

Mike Feehan
Guest
Mike Feehan

jd, your post above is just excellent, but I think inadvertently you left out a detail at the end when you say:
“physicians account for only around a third of all health care spending”
I think you mean that physicians’ own income accounts for only about a third . . . etc.
Physicians order or prescribe most of the rest. (and, fortunately or not, patients who have little financial reason to question why, too often don’t question why)

jd
Guest
jd

Scott, Respectfully, you’re just flat-out wrong on the facts. There is not a single health insurer of any size earning even 15% net income. Not one. You say you’ve posted information supporting your claim before. Please post it again. I’d like to know who is peddling this. The historical profit margin on health insurance is close to 5%, and almost no one makes more than 10%. You can argue that the system sucks for all sorts of reasons, but if you claim it’s because insurers are carting off 15-50% margins, you’re misinformed. I wanted to provide a link, but I… Read more »

scott
Guest
scott

JD- “Insurers will generally give you as much coverage as you can pay for, plus 10-15% admin and 3-5% profit.” I disagree. Insurers are posting record profits, anywhere from 15% to 55% and I have posted the numbers here once before. However the school of thought is these insurers are posting record profits because of the high costs of healthcare. So in line with that logic, doctors should be posting record profits or at the very least should be seeing a rise in reimbursement. Not so according to nation wide study done by Physicians Practice. According to the study “average… Read more »

jd
Guest
jd

I should add that (1) not only does not “feel” like a marginal problem to those left holding the bag on coverage decisions, it isn’t a marginal problem for them. I meant that it was marginal from the point of view of its contribution to our total cost/access mess.
Being denied coverage that you paid for occurs vastly less often than not being able to get adequate coverage in the first place.

jd
Guest
jd

O. Neimon, You would do well to listen to the comments of people like Stuart S. and Peter on this board. The overwhelming problem with our system is that it costs too much, not that private insurers are skimping on care in order to reduce premiums. Insurers will generally give you as much coverage as you can pay for, plus 10-15% admin and 3-5% profit. The problem is that fewer and fewer can pay for rich benefits anymore. For the same level of coverage, premiums are going up at over twice the general rate of inflation, and have been for… Read more »

Peter
Guest
Peter

I’ll support Stuart S. on this one. I too looked at the link Mr. Browning gave and concluded that free market plans, no matter where they are, fail to control costs. It’ll take time, as with America, for the Swiss to see that gov run single pay is the only way to stop the juggernaught of free market pricing. From the link: “He called on all sides, notably health insurers and the cantonal authorities, to make renewed efforts to reduce spending and aim for more cost efficiency.” “There are currently 87 private insurers providing mandatory basic health care coverage for… Read more »

Stuart Sherman
Guest
Stuart Sherman

Hi Stuart its Stuart. Thanks for posting to the article. It mentioned a few points it mentions, other than the Swiss voters voting against a single payer system. One major one is that Switzerland, with its private insurance market, has the most expensive health system in Europe, with annual spending around 11.6. Additionally it has 100,000 without insurance because of rising premium rates (about 1.5% of the population). Granted the US has 10 times that amount of unisurance and higher health care expenditures. Also, the strongest opposition to this plan came from the regions (German) with the, on average, lower… Read more »

O. Neimon
Guest
O. Neimon

Funny how? The writer is presenting evidence to support his view. So. If you have conflicting evidence? The snarky “I hate to tell you, but you’re wrong” language can go away, thank you. This kind of attitude does nothing to support your argument, so back to your alter of Rove for instructions with you. Meanwhile, it looks to me as though this was about their disability system, but I’m not sure what you meant, since there are several articles on that page. And, from my point of view, market-driven healthcare will fail because the market incentive is NOT to provide… Read more »

Stuart Browning
Guest

Funny that you would mention the story in Peru but not mention the fact that an overwhelming number of Swiss voters said ‘no’ to a single-payer system last week:
http://www.swissinfo.org/eng/front/detail/Health_reform_flops_at_the_ballot_box.html?siteSect=105&sid=7609812&cKey=1173677031000