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RdocMatthew HoltTom LeithPeterBarry Carol Recent comment authors
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Rdoc
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Hank wrote: The phenomenon of office co-pays and rx cards is relatively new, and is quite out of step with the underlying principles of insurance, which is about managing risk, not paying for the small stuff. By way of analogy, one wouldn’t expect one’s auto insurance to pay for a new horn, or windshield wipers.

Peter
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Peter

Tom, First Class Price Discrimination exists because it is a way for the hospitals to gouge those people with the least power. They have a contract with the insurers and they have price controls with Medicare. So what group do they have the most price monopoly power with – the uninsured. My rather dramatic reference to the flood victims on roof tops is actually a symbol of a much deeper system problem. For example it shows not only the ineptitude of the local, state, and federal governments but also government enacted wealth distribution by those with lobby/money influence. For decades… Read more »

Tom Leith
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Tom Leith

> On entering hospital the patient would get an > immediate credit and insurance check. If they > don’t qualify they are wheeled back onto the > street to cope any way they can. That would be > the purest free market model. Peter, you confuse “freedom” and “free market” with “inhumanity”. There might be some hospitals that behaved this way, and they would be free (in the eyes of the law) to do so under a laissez-faire regime. Most hospitals have not behaved this way in the past, and there is no particular reason to think most (or even… Read more »

Matthew Holt
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Matthew Holt

Tom…please stop getting the point correct before I’ve had a chance to write it up! See my article above…

Tom Leith
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Tom Leith

> The study found that in 2004, the most recent year for > which full data are available, hospitals in Washington > State charged an additional $738 million — or 14.3 > percent of their revenue — to private payers to make > up for Medicare and Medicaid underpayments. What a load of nonsense! This presumes there is a “correct” price for medical services, and there just isn’t. Underpayments? Compared to what? Are we to understand that hospitals would bill less to commercial payers if only the guv’mut would pay more? Please! Hospitals are complaining that Medicare and Medicaid have… Read more »

Peter
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Peter

Do you advocate more of the same to solve the problem? The best free market solution to this would be to NOT treat those that cannot pay. On entering hospital the patient would get an immediate credit and insurance check. If they don’t qualify they are wheeled back onto the street to cope any way they can. That would be the purest free market model. Maybe the scenes of people on roof tops during Katrina is the scene you want for healthcare in the U.S. Limiting access to primary care by using price, then having those same people show up… Read more »

Barry Carol
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Barry Carol

With both Medicare and Medicaid costs exploding out of control, hospitals complaining that they can’t make ends meet on those meager reimbursement rates, and the private sector complaining about unsustainable cost shifting, tell me again how a single payer Medicare for all system is supposed to fix this — even after those greedy private insurers have their profits and wasteful administrative costs removed from the system.