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THCB: The First Podcast–Erick Novack

Here is THCB’s first podcast. You can listen to it here by clicking on this link — Eric Novack interview, and telling it to "open" when it asks you.  That should make the file play in your MP3 player of choice.  But the real idea is to get your iPod aggregator (I use iPodder) to move it to your MP3 player of choice, by aiming at the RSS feed here. And then get out of the house and still listen.

All I did was record an interview over Skype using Total Recorder and then had it saved as an MP3 file.  Once I saved that up to my hosting service (easy) I figured out how to put it in my RSS feed (much harder, or at least harder finding out how to). You can either point your podcast aggregator (like iPodder) at http://matthewholt.typepad.com/the_health_care_blog/rss.xml or you can get it by looking at the "Subscribe to my podcast" line next to the site feeds in the right sidebar.

Take a listen, let me know what you think.

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Matthew HoltgadflyRon Greiner Recent comment authors
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Ron Greiner
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Ron Greiner

Matthew you wrote, “So Ron, why haven’t you sold me a $2600 deductible plan with NO extra co-insurance after the deductible that costs less than $200 a month?” Ha ha you are right Matthew. I went to ehealthinsurance and used a zip code of a client of mine who has moved to CA, the 93650 zip code. I also think you are 42 years old and don’t smoke. 15 HSA programs came up and we were the only one with a $2,600 deductible that pays 100%. Golden Rule is not in CA and all those local CA insurance companies have… Read more »

Matthew Holt
Guest

So Ron, why haven’t you sold me a $2600 deductible plan with NO extra co-insurance after the deductible that costs less than $200 a month? And yes I understand that HSAs are a good deal tax wise for most indivduals. But if they have a plan like mine — from that weird company Blue Shield of California, which looks like most high deducitible plans AND they use it because of catastophic costs, they do pay extra out of pocket. And every high-deductible plan I have ever had OR ever had quoted to me looks like that (check your friens site… Read more »

Ron Greiner
Guest
Ron Greiner

I love you too Matthew. The typical HSA for me is $2,600 annual deductible that pays 100% thereafter. But the typical HSA has a lower deductible than that for the country as a whole. Why? Because agents make more when they lower the HSA deductible because the premium goes up. Of course I tell people, “Who would pay extra just to limit the size of their tax dodge?” You are correct that Federal law allows the max out-of-pocket on HSA insurance at $5,100 if the client chooses that option but very few do yet. I’m sure when the clients have… Read more »

Matthew Holt
Guest

Ron You have again not answered the macro question. I dont know how smart your wife is or how much you know, but it has NOTHING to do with your individual clients. On the micro question, to your answer I must just say “Bull-Shit” From this website from MedAccess — unless they’ve got it wrong, http://www.medplanaccess.com/hsa/hdhp_benefits.htm “Benefits under a Qualified High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)– Before you can establish a Health Savings Account (HSA) and make tax-advantaged HSA contributions, you must be enrolled in a qualified High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP). Single Coverage For single person coverage, a qualified High-Deductible Health Plan… Read more »

gadfly
Guest
gadfly

//saying that rdg is wealthy?//
Nope – just saying if he can afford $160/month, he’s more wealthy than the people I’m sticking up for: the people who will fall through the cracks.

Ron Greiner
Guest
Ron Greiner

gadfly,
rdg had the choice of paying $800 a month for COBRA or $160 a month for HSA family insurance and he picked the HSA. Are you saying that rdg is wealthy?
I think the COBRA insurance company is wealthy and rdg is a citizen reducing his cost so he will be able to purchase food for his family. Also, over 70% of HSAs are over 40 years old.

gadfly
Guest
gadfly

//there is disinformation about the HSA and you know it’s wrong, you should correct these people.// LOL – honestly, everytime I think I understand HSAs, it turns out I was wrong. Therefore, I’m in no position to correct any disinformation. However, I’m still under the impression that this is a gift money to the young, healthy, and relatively affluent. This is an interest group, and in the U.S. a large interest group always trumps the universal good. As a person of lower class origins, who didn’t manage to overcome the hurdles I faced in life, I tend to put my… Read more »

Ron Greiner
Guest
Ron Greiner

gadfly, This is why I like you. You wrote: //less left in their HSA (i.e. zero)// “Hmmm. This makes me wonder whether people will redirect the discretionary part of their income that previously went into an IRA into an HSA, thinking that this will double as their retirement plan. Any money spent on health care won’t be garnering interest, a loss that compounds over time.” I enroll all types of people but the average age is about 50. Some say, “Smart people have 401ks and IRAs but we use the state lottery as we plan for retirement.” These people save… Read more »

gadfly
Guest
gadfly

//less left in their HSA (i.e. zero)// Hmmm. This makes me wonder whether people will redirect the discretionary part of their income that previously went into an IRA into an HSA, thinking that this will double as their retirement plan. Any money spent on health care won’t be garnering interest, a loss that compounds over time. //what passes for policy in this country// ITA, it will be a cold day in hell before anyone in this country cares about the macro level. People just want the best deal for themselves and to make sure no one else is getting a… Read more »

Ron Greiner
Guest
Ron Greiner

Matthew you wrote, “1/ The typical High Deductible plan has a higher deductible and total out of pocket to the person who uses it, than is allowed to be put into their HSA. So a sick person who maxes out their deductible will by definition spend more out of pocket beyond what they put in their HSA and have less left in their HSA (i.e. zero) than a healthy person” Sorry Matthew you are wrong again on HSAs. The typical deductible on single HSA insurance is not above the amount that may go into the HSA. For example, most HSA… Read more »

Matthew Holt
Guest

There are 2 issues 1/ The typical High Deductible plan has a higher deductible and total out of pocket to the person who uses it, than is allowed to be put into their HSA. So a sick person who maxes out their deductible will by definition spend more out of pocket beyond what they put in their HSA and have less left in their HSA (i.e. zero) than a healthy person 2/ On a macro scale, if everyone in the country has a high deductible plan that costs $100 a month, and puts $200 a month in a personal account,… Read more »

gadfly
Guest
gadfly

//maximum this guy can owe is $2,600 a year//
I’m the first to admit that I may have misunderstood the previous criticisms offered against HSAs, which seemed to say patients would be on the hook for large charges and out of luck on RX. Anyone on the HSA-critical side care to clarify for me?
Sorry, Ron, I don’t trust your account because you come across like a sales pitch.

Ron Greiner
Guest
Ron Greiner

Matthew, you wrote, “No one (well maybe apart from Gadlfy) is disputing that 65$ a month catastrophic coverage with a $2-3,000 max out of pocket is probably OK for this young guy. The problem is that if everyone in America gets one of those plans, there will not be enough money in the insurance pool to deal with care for the people who need it.” Where did you get that information or is it just your opinion? I said the podcast is great because if you could hear the tenure of this guys voice it would be really informative. People… Read more »

Ron Greiner
Guest
Ron Greiner

gadfly, You wrote, “The scary thing is that this guy probably will go with what’s cheapest on the surface – the HSA. Thus he will become one of the government’s we-don’t-need-universal-coverage statistic, and he will only find out the drawbacks of having an HSA when he gets hit by a random bicycle messenger on the street. Just the X-Rays take his entire contribution the the HSA, and then he discovers he’s on the hook for $10,000 before the insurance starts kicking in, and the pain-killers aren’t covered at all…” That’s illegal. The maximum this guy can owe is $2,600 a… Read more »

Matthew Holt
Guest

Hey guys these aren’t comments about the podcast! (Well not the last two)
No one (well maybe apart from Gadlfy) is disputing that 65$ a month catastrophic coverage with a $2-3,000 max out of pocket is probably OK for this young guy. The problem is that if everyone in America gets one of those plans, there will not be enough money in the insurance pool to deal with care for the people who need it.