Matthew Holt

Matthew Holt
Matthew Holt is the founder and publisher of The Health Care Blog and still writes regularly for the site. He is also the co-founder of the Health 2.0 Conference, as well as a Founding Principal of the associated consulting firm Health 2.0 Advisors.

BTG buys Oncoverse–Amanda Goltz explains all

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Amanda Goltz is a massive ball of energy in the world of digital health. For the past 2 years she’s been working for English pharma company BTG. But how does a pharma company get involved in health tech without wasting everyone’s time, and what exactly are they trying to do? Amanda certainly has both opinions and a plan. Today part of that plan became official with the purchase of Oncoverse, a cancer management program BTG has been working on with Wanda and Dignity Health. I spoke to her Monday morning my time to find out more (and yes, if you wait to the end, there is both a job “offer” and I have my own BBC Live home office moment!)

Ayasdi–Big Data changing hospital operations

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One of the more interesting companies playing in the analytics space is Ayasdi. We’ve featured them at Health 2.0 a couple of times, but at HIMSS I got a chance to talk a little more in depth with chief medical officer Francis Campion about exactly how they parse apart huge numbers of data points, usually from EMRs, and then operationalize changes for their clients. The end result is more effective care and lower variability across different facilities, for example changing when drugs are delivered before surgery in order to improve outcomes. And increasingly their clients are doing this over multiple clinical pathways. They’re really on the cutting edge of how data will change care delivery (a tenet of our definition of Health 2.0) so watch the interview to hear and see more!

Bridget Duffy: Improving the patient experience

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Bridget Duffy, the CMO of communications tech company Vocera & head of its Experience Innovation Network, is a national leader in the patient experience movement. And we all agree there are lots of improvements needed in the experience for both patients and front line clinicians. Anyone following the story about the death of my friend Jess Jacobs last year knows that there are problems a plenty in how patients are treated (pun intended). Bridget talked with me at HIMSS17 about how well we’ve done and how far we have to go.

David Delaney, SAP: Democratizing Data Science

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SAP is a giant of ERP but over a decade or so has been layering both new acquisitions in analytics (Business Objects, Success Factors) and developing the Hana “cloudfirst” data platform. They’re actually a quiet giant in health care, in part because of a partnership with Epic. But the next step is providing what they’re calling a “democratization of data analytics” allowing line managers & clinicians to really understand what’s happening at the coal face of care delivery. It’s a complex space, but one David Delaney, Chief Medical Officer at SAP, explains in this interview from HIMSS17

Interview: Robert Armstrong, CEO, Appstem

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Continuing my series of interviews from HIMSS17, is one with Robert Armstrong, CEO of Appstem. Appstem is one of the companies that quietly builds most of those ubiquitous mobile apps branded by health plans, pharma companies and a large number of product companies too. It’s an example of the hyper-specialization going on within technology, as even well funded product companies start to use companies like Appstem to build onto their partner APIs and build out their portfolios. An interesting niche and one that’s a lot more important that you’d think–it’s well worth a listen to Robert to find out more.

New “kid” on specialty ACO block –Chuck Saunders, Integra Connect

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One of the more surprising announcements at HIMSS17 (or anywhere so far this year) was that a company led by some well known health tech veterans has both invested a ton of money and been off the ground for some time, while being very quiet about it. Integra Connect is the company and it’s a tech and services company providing ACO/APM/MACRA/ MIPS-type services for high cost specialty care (think cancer). CEO Chuck Saunders was at Aetna’s Healthagen group (and before that Broadlane/WebMD/EDS and some others I forget) and the Chairman (and source of most funding) is Raj Mantena who built several companies in the specialty pharmacy space (inc ION and Oncoscripts). Integra Connect already over 1,000 employees and several large physician groups as customers and I spoke with Chuck about the (high cost and pretty large) niche they’re in and how they’re working.

Kyruus “load balancing” health care — Julie Yoo Interview

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Continuing my interviews with various health tech players from HIMSS17, Julie Yoo MD may be one of the brightest people in health IT. She and her colleague Graham Gardner founded Kyruus to deal with one of the most complex problems in health care. The issue is the patient accessing the right doctor/provider, which is somewhat equivalent to getting everyone in the right plane to the right vacation (or in computer speak “load balancing“). While this sounds simple it’s a very complex issue with both a huge data problem (tracking which doctors are available and do what) and a rationalization issue (what patient needs what). Julie explains the problem and how Kyruus works with provider systems to fix it.

Cirrus MD — Text Connecting Your Doctor

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Last week was HIMSS17, the biggest health IT conference and as per usual I ran around interviewing various techies. I’ll be releasing these interviews over the next few days and weeks–Matthew Holt

First up is a rather fun live demo I did with Cirrus MD‘s medical director Blake McKinney. Cirrus MD is a niche player in the telehealth space, and has spent the last few years building out a text-based tool which is now being rolled out in Colorado and Texas. How does it work in practice? Well funnily enough, I happened to have a medical condition that needed to be checked out by a doctor. So here’s a real impromptu demo that shows how it works and gives a good idea of the user experience.

Elation’s Kyna Fong on a new type of EMR company

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There’s so much happening in the Health 2.0 world of new technology in health that it’s hard to keep up. AI, VR, AR, Blockchain–and they’re just the buzzwords keeping the VCs happy. So this year I’ve decided to try to interview more interesting new companies to keep you in the know. We’ll see how long that resolution lasts but first up is Kyna Fong, CEO of ElationHealth. Yes, she left a Stanford tenure-track professorship to start an EMR company, and no, she doesn’t sound crazy! This is an in-depth interview including a decent length demo, and it hints at how companies like hers might solve the conundrum of EMRs being necessary but impossible to use.

Want to help Technologies for Healthy Communities?

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Health 2.0 is actively expanding Technology for Healthy Communities and looking for large healthcare organizations and foundations to help support technology adoption at a community level.

Technology for Healthy Communities is a dynamic pilot program designed to catalyze the adoption of technologies in communities. The program fosters the development of sustainable partnerships to address the social determinants of health in the under-served regions that need it the most. Over 200 innovators across the U.S. submitted applications to the program, and through curated matchmaking and access to funding, selected innovators were matched with three participating communities to conduct pilot projects.

Snapshot of the three pilots:

  • Spartanburg, SC: ACCESS Health Spartanburg, a non-profit agency primarily working with the uninsured population, is piloting with Healthify to provide community interventions for social determinants of health at the point of care. With support from Spartanburg Way to Wellville and the Mary Black Foundation, the pilot aims to address current pain points in community health care, such as the inefficiency of addressing social needs of patients and helping to make case management easier.
  • Jacksonville, FL: The City of Jacksonville and the Health Planning Council of NE Florida, with support from the Clinton Foundation is piloting with CTY to deploy its signature product, NuminaTM. With this technology, bicycle and pedestrian traffic data will be collected to assess current safety conditions and plan improvements in the built environment for residents to be more physically active.
  • Alameda County, CA: The Community Health Center Network is piloting with Welkin Health to implement a case management tool that engages members and eases current healthcare worker burden. Together, they will pilot this case management tool in four centers to help community health workers to effectively and efficiently coordinate care.

Due to the high demand from tech innovators and communities, Health 2.0 is expanding the program to new communities, tech startups and organizations who can benefit from technology adoption. By addressing the social determinants of health, the program has the potential to implement unique tech applications and address some of the most important systemic issues at the community level.

Health 2.0 is looking for partners such as foundations, large health systems and corporations who want to support pilots to test innovations in communities, interact with the fastest growing startups in the tech scene, and help create business opportunities for technology companies. Program sponsors will also have the opportunity to address local health needs by bringing exciting, new technologies to under-served regions across the U.S.

The program will focus on tools that support access to a healthy lifestyle, in categories such as:

  • Access to healthcare services
  • Food insecurity
  • Affordable housing
  • Behavioral/mental health

If you are interested in partnering with Health 2.0 to help deliver technology to communities, contact [email protected] to learn about opportunities to support the program.

Alexandra Camesas is a program manager at Catalyst @ Health 2.0