Categories

Tag: Peter Kruger

Let’s Face(book) the Hard Truth About Healthcare

‘In the time when new media.

Was the big idea.’

These two lines at the end of the album track  ‘Kite’ earned U2 a place in a recent list of suspect popular song lyrics. Some Health 2.0 vendors are also struggling to get ‘social media’ to rhyme with  ‘healthcare’ but will no doubt carrying on trying to do so. With Goldman Sachs throwing $1.5 billion in Facebook’s direction it makes sense for anyone in the online health business to position themselves as close to the social media company as possible, on the off chance that they will be able to pan a few nuggets out of the fast flowing stream of cash.

While no doubt some of the funds the bank is putting together will be used for healthcare related applications it is not immediately obvious what Facebook can do that Google and Microsoft have not already tried. Both these companies are trying to sell to healthcare providers whose business models if they do exist are confused and, in some cases failing. One way to gain a better understanding of the healthcare market is to view it as a mathematical equations that can be solved by eliminating one variable at a time.

So What If The UK’s National Health Service Did Not Exist?

You log on to NHS.uk and are greeted with a message saying “Sorry, this service has been discontinued. The UK government can no longer afford to provide you with healthcare.” And that is it, apart one last piece on advice. “Please take care.” This presumably aimed at Darwin Award candidates who were hoping to break the land speed record using fireworks and a skateboard and fully expect the local hospital to fix any resulting damage. Also perhaps directed at anyone with a grumbling appendix thinking of entering a baked bean-eating contest. (More about these people later.)

So what difference would it make if there were no healthcare provider? For a start everyone in the UK, apart from the 1.3-million ex-NHS workers, would be £1600 a year better off. A young person leaving school would have saved enough to pay for their university education. A young couple in their mid twenties would have saved enough to put a down payment on their first house. OK average life expectancy would fall and the last couple of years (or most likely months) of a person’s life would probably be more unpleasant, but the proceeding sixty five or so years would be a lot better. There, two of the government’s major economic headaches eliminated in a stroke – an unfortunate turn of phrase in this case. With an extra £100 billion per annum sloshing around in the economy most of the 1.3 million former NHS employees would be able to find new jobs.Continue reading…

Who Cares?

The father of a wireless engineer, who made a good living designing mobile devices, contracted a rare and chronic form of athlete’s foot. Over the course of a few months, the father’s condition worsened and eventually he died. Vowing he would make sure that no-one suffered the way his father had during the last few weeks of his life, the engineer set about developing a wireless athlete’s foot detector.

After obtaining the backing of a venture capitalist, he licensed technology from a university spinout that specialised in bio-sensing and embedded it onto a wireless chipset, which he then packaged into a simple mobile device. The athlete’s foot monitor is now on the market and our wireless engineer is talking to a number of healthcare providers, including the NHS.

There are two important things about this story; first it is complete fiction – and  second; anyone who has been involved in the wireless and mobile industry, will have come across real life examples of personal quests masquerading as business plans.

Continue reading…

Registration

Forgotten Password?