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Tag: Captureproof

Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 69 | Pre-HIMSSanity!

Today on Health in 2 Point 00, Jess and I are pregaming HIMSS at WSJ Tech Health. In this episode, Jess asks me about my biggest takeaways from WSJ Tech Health—and what we’re looking forward to at HIMSS. We’ll be at booth #5594 with SMACK.health, along with WTF Health, our new podcast Hardcore Health and ten exciting tech companies including: Tag.bio, BlueStream Health, Happego, Ouchie, SurveyorHealth, Dot.Health, SAFE App, InPharmD, CaptureProof and Visolyr. Get a rundown of them here. We also have a guest question from Katie McGraw from W2O about predictions for big topics at HIMSS. –Matthew Holt

 

Health in 2 Point 00 Episode 58

Today on Episode 58 of Health in 2 Point 00, Jess and I have more to share from Exponential Medicine, but this time we’re at the Health Innovation Lab checking out all of the startups. In this episode, Jess and I talk to Meghan Conroy from CaptureProof about decoupling medical care from time and location, Care Angel‘s Wolf Shlagman about the world’s first AI and voice powered virtual nursing assistant, and highlight Humm’s brain band which improves working memory, concentration, and visual attention. We leave you with some parting words from Godfrey Nazareth: “Let’s set the world on fire. Let’s change the world, with love.” -Matthew Holt 

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

These days I’m spending a lot of time getting in depth with many tech companies. From time to time I’ll be asking those innovators to tell their story on THCB, and suggest what problems they are solving. First up is Meghan Conroy from CaptureproofMatthew Holt

Today’s doctors are communicating with their patients less than ever before, even as their days grow longer and busier. Physicians are pressured to see more patients in shorter encounters, while at the same time shouldering more of the administrative and documentation tasks associated with electronic medical records (EMR). The result is physicians who are spending more time looking at patients’ EMRs than looking at – or interacting with – the patients themselves.

Research bears this out. A recent RAND study shows that providers are frustrated by the high volume of clerical work, and the implementation of poorly designed technology, that hamper their efforts to deliver effective, efficient care. Primary care physicians spend nearly two hours on EMR tasks for every hour of direct patient care, with an average of six hours – more than half their workday – interacting with the EMR during and after clinic hours. The same study found that U.S. physicians’ clinical notes are, on average, four times as long as those in other countries.

No wonder the country is facing an epidemic of physician burnout. Doctors have become high paid data entry workers rather than caregivers. They are tethered to their screens, filling out countless forms and responding to multiple messages, eating into their face-to-face time with patients. With more patients to see, they have less time to prep for each encounter, leading to sub-optimal patient experiences and poorer outcomes.

Ironically, while technology helped create this problem, it also could provide the solution. Continue reading…

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