THCB

What’s The Worst Case Scenario In Japan Nuke Crisis?

This from John Beddington, the United Kingdom’s chief science advisor at its Tokyo embassy:

Let me now talk about what would be a reasonable worst case scenario.  If the Japanese fail to keep the reactors cool and fail to keep the pressure in the containment vessels at an appropriate level, you can get this, you know, the dramatic word “meltdown”.  But what does that actually mean?  What a meltdown involves is the basic reactor core melts, and as it melts, nuclear material will fall through to the floor of the container. There it will react with concrete and other materials … that is likely… remember this is the reasonable worst case, we don’t think anything worse is going to happen.  In this reasonable worst case you get an explosion.  You get some radioactive material going up to about 500 metres up into the air.  Now, that’s really serious, but it’s serious again for the local area.  It’s not serious for elsewhere even if you get a combination of that explosion it would only have nuclear material going in to the air up to about 500 metres.  If you then couple that with the worst possible weather situation i.e. prevailing weather taking radioactive material in the direction of  Greater Tokyo and you had maybe rainfall which would bring the radioactive material down do we have a problem?  The answer is unequivocally no.   Absolutely no issue.  The problems are within 30 km of the reactor.  And to give you a flavour for that, when Chernobyl had a massive fire at the graphite core, material was going up not just 500 metres but to 30,000 feet.  It was lasting not for the odd hour or so but lasted months, and that was putting nuclear radioactive material up into the upper atmosphere for a very long period of time.  But even in the case of Chernobyl, the exclusion zone that they had was about 30 kilometres.   And in that exclusion zone, outside that, there is no evidence whatsoever to indicate people had problems from the radiation.  The problems with Chernobyl were people were continuing to drink the water, continuing to eat vegetables and so on and that was where the problems came from.  That’s not going to be the case here.  So what I would really re-emphasise is that this is very problematic for the area and the immediate vicinity and one has to have concerns for the people working there. Beyond that 20 or 30 kilometres, it’s really not an issue for health.

Merrill Goozner has been writing about economics and health care for many years. The former chief economics correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, Merrill has written for a long list of publications including the New York Times, The American Prospect and The Washington Post. His most recent book, “The $800 Million Dollar Pill – The Truth Behind the Cost of New Drugs ” (University of California Press, 2004) has won acclaim from critics for its treatment of the issues facing the health care system and the pharmaceutical industry in particular. You can read more pieces by Merrill at GoozNews, where this post first appeared.

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tom schiererRandyMd.Rakebul HasanBobbyG Recent comment authors
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tom schierer
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tom schierer

why are we already detecting radiation on west coast and if we have a complete meltdown and a explotion the rest of japan is history also and water will become more valuable than gas yes we will be effected in us soon

Randy
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Randy

Ok Merrill tell me this. What happens if they lose reactor #3 to a complete meltdown and need to evacuate the area of emergency workers? What happens to the remaining 5 reactors?

Md.Rakebul Hasan
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Md.Rakebul Hasan

I know about the worst case scenario what is happened in japan.to get heath information
http://www.tinnituscurefast.net/deal/quietustinnitus

BobbyG
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Irrespective of the eventual extent of radiation exposure and doses, what we minimally have now looks like a set of Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactors. Done, kaput, concrete them over, cordon them off. TMI #2 cost about a billion dollars in then-day money to sequester.