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Vote Yes

Brian-klepper One of us was at a local diner yesterday, when a good friend and health plan broker walked up to say hello. This guy delivers premium increases every day to employers, and understands how broken things are. “I hope Congress votes yes,” he said flatly. “We’ve got to finally move beyond the status quo and try to change the system.”

As conflicted as we are over it, we agree and we hope the reforms pass. The die is now cast, so there is no point in continuing to urge a different approach. As terribly flawed as it is on cost controls, the bill represents two very important things that, in our opinion, the nation desperately needs.

First, it will significantly open access, bringing America much closer to universal coverage and making personal financial distress a much less likely outcome of sickness or injury. As Nicholas Kristof pointed out Wednesday, that alone will dramatically improve the health of the nation. Widespread uninsurance and under-insurance have been a national disgrace for decades. Passing this bill would be a commitment to move beyond that shame.

Second, we believe the President is attempting to deal with many difficult problems thoughtfully and in good faith within an extremely toxic political environment. We want to see him succeed, because we think that his approach is good for America.

The bill is not what we hoped for. We’re disappointed in the behaviors of both parties. But after a year of wrangling, it is what is possible now. There is no reason the bill’s inadequacies can’t be revisited.

We hope Congress votes Yes on this bill. Making care and coverage more accessible and more fair would be a momentous and long overdue achievement.

Brian Klepper and David C. Kibbe write together about health care reform, market dynamics, and innovation.

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stop smoking helpspikeNateF.David Mynatt Recent comment authors
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stop smoking help
Guest

Wow, talk about a hot topic. Okay, so is healthcare a right or a privilege? The older I get, the more cynical I get. I believe both sides of the aisle want something done, and Lord knows, something needs to be done, I just think they allow their political positioning to get in the way of what we would like to call real progress.
Thanks for listening.

The EHR Guy
Guest

Yes won!

spike
Guest
spike

It’s great to see this post.
The simplest thing you can say is it gets us one step closer to a country where the way to make money in healthcare is by making and keeping people well instead of screwing them.
This bill helps make that true for insurance companies. Hopefully future bills will make that more true for hospitals, doctors, DMEs, pharmaceuticals, etc., next.
To me, putting incentives in the right direction is all government can excel at and this bill is a step in that direction.

Nate
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Nate

speaking of lies and propoganda; http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2010/03/19/national/w131302D40.DTL&tsp=1 President Barack Obama would give federal authorities the power to block unreasonable rate hikes. Yet when Democrats unveiled the final, incarnation of their health care bill this week, the proposal was nowhere to be found. Ditto with several Republican ideas that Obama had said he wanted to include after a televised bipartisan summit last month, And those “special deals” that Obama railed against and said he wanted to eliminate? With the exception of two of the most notorious — extra Medicaid money for Nebraska and a carve-out for Florida seniors faced with losing certain… Read more »

Nate
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Nate

“we believe the President is attempting to deal with many difficult problems thoughtfully and in good faith”
Exactly how many broken promises before you question the good faith? CSPAN? What about those 4 Republican ideas? Cornhusker and LA purchase. Mayeb the questions should be how exactly do you define good faith?
” “the political process is inadequate and has become fundamentally flawed, and therefore unable to reach a successful solution.”
Only if your will is to impose a socialistic structure on America it doesn’t want.

F.
Guest
F.

WRONG
“This country is in sad, sad shape right now, let’s hope on Monday it starts getting better.”
Wrong — thanks to Harvard Law bumblers — USA healthcare has gotten w-o-r-s-e.
Who would risk funding medical innovation, when your work can be STOLEN by arrogant lying politicians? So — for a year — nothing.
And in the future — more taxes, more deadwood, more MESS.
Nov. 2 — this MESS is cleaned up.

David Mynatt
Guest
David Mynatt

Great article, I too look forward to living in a healthier country (one where I’m not filing bankruptcy because I couldn’t afford my medical bills and one where my wife can get the medical attention she needs for the tumor behind her eye). For us, this really is a life or death vote, and we already lost one child because we couldn’t afford insurance, make too much money for anyone in our state to help us, and our hospitals refused payment arrangements. This country is in sad, sad shape right now, let’s hope on Monday it starts getting better.

Frank1
Guest
Frank1

W.M. NEEDS A BRAIN
Trolling boards to find business. How common. Tsk, tsk.
++++++++++
” .. Not an English PhD and apparently also brainless, as is Mr. MyMillionSite ..”

Steve Ludley
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Steve Ludley

I like the big O but ” we believe the President is attempting to deal with many difficult problems thoughtfully and in good faith within an extremely toxic political environment. ” Kidding right? Or are you succups? Kibbeee and Skleper ought know that Obama has been an athlete of hypocrisy. He has contributed to the toxicity with the innumerable conflicted people he has apppointed or are in his regime to write laws. He too gets his education from lobbyists and uses useless anecdotes to make a point affecting the entire nation. However, it is an improvement since Bush does not… Read more »

Wendell Murray
Guest

Not an English PhD and apparently also brainless, as is Mr. MyMillionSite. Where do these people come from?
At least archon41 is a good writter, albeit without saying much of substance, and presumably Nate knows something about something, although it is hard to tell what that something might be, but the comments from these two belong in WSJ commentary.

Not An English PhD
Guest
Not An English PhD

FUNNY
” .. this it not the end of the reform process, just the beginnning.”
There are so many legal flaws in this piece of dreck, it is a “Paycheck for Life” for a 1,000 law professors.
Barking-mad insanity that will enrich only the bureaucrats. Great job, Obama, you one-termer. You have no one to blame but yourself.

MYMILLIONSITE
Guest

THIS IS A PETITION TO THE UNITED STATED FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOR A INDIVIDUAL OPT OUT REQUEST FOR HEALTH CARE We The Undersigned Wish To Convey By Their Signatures Below That They Wish To Have The Same Rights Under The Current Health Care Legislation. That Allows The Individual States That If This Would Place An Economic Burden On That State They Have The Option To Opt Out Of This Mandate. Currently Over 35 Of The 50 States Have Or Will File A Legal Action Against Washington To Claim This Is An Unconstitutional Bill. If The States Are At 35 against and… Read more »

Wendell Murray
Guest

I agree with Messrs. Klepper’s and Kibbe’s assessment. Not having any first-hand experience with the legislative process, I marvel at the absurdity of it from the outside. But I agree with all those with knowledge on topic who make similar arguments for passage and rapid passage – as in this weekend of the bill by the House. Further delay by Democrats – of course forget about the idiot Republican members of Congress – is inexcusable. The President, the White House staff and the so-called “leadership”, an inaccurate moniker for the Speaker, et. al. but the one generally used, should use… Read more »

Brian Klepper
Guest

Margalit, As you point out, its hard to directly correlate the lobbying contributions with votes. The interests carefully cater to both sides of the aisle, although they tend to focus on members with more seniority and clout. But the real impact of the money is in the shaping of the bills, which determines what provisions are actually included. This bill is dramatically flawed as much for what it omits as what it includes, and that’s key. Once bills have taken form, then the discussion can be more strictly ideological. Matthew puts his finger on it when he says “the political… Read more »

Margalit Gur-Arie
Guest

Question for the experts:
Just saw this voting tally chart in WaPo. It sort of threw a wrench in my thinking. It seems that there is really no correlation between health industry campaign contributions and position on health reform.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/politics/votes/house/finalhealthcare/
Seems clear party lines to me and nothing more.
How does this square with the contention that these Congress folks are motivated by corruption? Am I missing something?
P.S. Brian, I am glad you found your peace too… and David also… 🙂