Matthew Holt

We’ll be back here in 2016, unless

I’ve been meaning for a while to put up a common sense post that points out that if we don’t do reform now, we’ll end up with cost at close to $30K per family as opposed to the $15K as they are now, and in turn that will mean 80–100 million uninsured as opposed to 50–60 million we have now, and of course the end result will be a health care industry that looks like General Motors.

But luckily Joe Paduda just wrote the post for me and added a date—go read at Managed Care Matters.

Which just leads to one conclusion. The health care industry had better buckle down with the Blue Dogs, put more on the table, and get something passed that they can live with now. AND in addition, they need to figure out some way to stop the loony fringe at the town halls and listening to Rush Limbaugh from making the next best alternative be doing nothing—which is what they want.

Otherwise the conversation they’ll be having with the President and the Chinese central bank in 2016 will be very, very unpleasant.

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Illegal AlienBarry CarolIllegal WorkerAaron RobinsonMG Recent comment authors
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Illegal Alien
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Illegal Alien

TheGroupGuy,
Thanks for the good news!
We do pay taxes and social security. Of course, to the system it looks like a real gringo was doing the paying.
Isn’t it a miracle. Finally a free healthcare system for all of America. Yes, all: north, central and south America inclusive.
Gracias Hermanos del Norte! Arriba, Arriba, Andalé!
Your Illegal Alien, Speedy Gonzalez

MG
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MG

Margalit – Republicans don’t need to have a 1000-page bill but they do need to come out with something more credible than basically a 2-3 Powerpoint slide presentation with 6 or 7 basic ideas that don’t have much unison or real chance to tackle healthcare inflation. That essentially is what Gingrich is shoveling. That’s no surprise because he leaps around policy topic to policy topic like a 5-year old who ate too much cake/drank too much sugar at a birthday party. Even the piecemeal ideas that are being laid out there as part of the Republican counterproposals are more ideologically… Read more »

Nate
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Nate

“But Nate as per usual, shout “Ted Kennedy, HMO Act” and tell lies and at least all will be well in your not exactly expansive mind.” Matt that almost felt personal. It would seem the Sunday Times and NHS Physicians are also suffering from non expansive minds. “The investigation also found NHS has invoked a policy of refusing care altogether to patients who, often upon physician recommendation, choose to pay out-of-pocket for best-available drug treatments.” “Many new, privately available drugs are potential lifesavers but are de facto prohibited by Britain’s slow-changing government monopoly health care bureaucracy.” “Despite this proven effectiveness,… Read more »

Margalit Gur-Arie
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GroupGuy, you got your quotations mixed up. I didn’t say anything about piecemeal (it was MG). Everything in less than 1000 pages of legislation must be piecemeal 🙂

TheGroupGuy
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Matthew, Second, EVERYTHING that the groupguy suggests has been done before and more piecemeal by the private sector. And where it was done correctly it worked right Matthew? In the absence of system-wide government reform it cannot be successful. Workers compensation is a system wide government reform that has lagely been unsuccessful controlling medical inflation despite 100 years+ of oversight. How did TennCare work out it was statewide right? How is Massachussets bending the curve down? But government regulated and led reform (of many different types) has been successful in keeping costs down in every other country. Yes by rationing… Read more »

TheGroupGuy
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Excellent points Barry.
Margalit,
“Still, the comments by TheGroupGuy and Nate are generally what I have seen from the right on health care reform. No comprehensive reform but baseless retorts and piecemeal ideas.”
One might infer that construing the entire health reform position of the right or Nate or I from the comments on a single post could could also be called piecemeal.

Barry Carol
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Barry Carol

First, regarding the notion that 20% of the people account for 80% of healthcare claims, as Margalit points out, they are not the same people from year to year. Several years back, the CBO did a study that showed that in any given year, the 5% of Medicare beneficiaries with the highest claims accounted for 43% of claims costs. However, if you look at cumulative costs over a 5 year period, the most expensive 5% of beneficiaries accounted for only 27% of cumulative 5 year Medicare spending. This is because some beneficiaries died along the way while others had a… Read more »

Matthew Holt
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Nate says “Like in the UK, if you have the nerve to pay for your own care outside of the system they take away all of your care.” A usual pure tosh. There’s been a parallel private system in the UK since 1948. Anyone can pay cash or buy private insurance–and aobut 10% of Brits do so. Furthermore since the late 1990s the PCTs (that is the government) have bought care for their patients from the private sector both in the UK and Europe. But Nate as per usual, shout “Ted Kennedy, HMO Act” and tell lies and at least… Read more »

Illegal Worker
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Illegal Worker

Hola, Please don’t forget us illegal aliens from Mexico all the way down to Colombia. We need quality healthcare too. Remember, we build your houses, do your lawns, clean the crap you leave behind in hotel rooms, cook most of your food (yes, those little guys that you see in the asian restaurant kitchens are actually Mexicanitos). We also work in your hospitals. Yes, we clean them, not only in border states but all the way up to Michigan (short for Mi Chicano land). And also be reminded that we will be your total workforce in approximately 20 years. See,… Read more »

Nate
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Nate

businesses and individuals explore and exploite every loop hole they can find, pre-existing is the result of individuals exploiting loop holes. Government has never been effective at preventing it, they come in after wards spends billions and promise it will never happen again. We can’t trust government to do the right thing. Through thousands of years of history and hundreds of thousands of governments has one ever been completly trustworthy? “Does it really matter what happens on capital hill if the solutions that will result in a long term sustainable health delivery industry are mostly independent of legislation?” Sadly it… Read more »

Alexander Saip
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Nate,
The lesson to learn from that Japanese case is that:
1. The administrative branch may not be always right in their interpretation of the law. No argument here.
2. That is why democracy needs checks and balances, based on separation of powers.
Are you implying that a private payer would not have explored a loophole in the law, given a chance?
I am with you that opting out of Medicare should not be the reason to stop sending Social Security checks. See #1.

Aaron Robinson
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I, like most of you would like to see reasonable healthcare reform passed that would lower healthcare costs and cover all Americans. If it does not pass all is not lost. The 2016 prediction may or may not come to pass. As health care cost rise so will the number of uninsured. As business struggle with healthcare costs they will be more likely to try new approaches. All this adds up to an opportunity like no other, to reinvent health delivery. Disruptive innovators who provide low cost High value health focused care will win the day. Does it really matter… Read more »

Nate
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Nate

“On November 8, 2007, an individual patient successfully sued the government in the Tokyo District Court by claiming that the government violated his constitutional rights by refusing to allow him to apply his public health insurance to any of his cancer treatment because part of his treatment had included uninsured services. The government had insisted that such prohibited “mixed” treatment relieved it of its duty to pay even for the insurable portion of his treatment. In effect, the court ruled that the government’s suppression of a mixed system was unconstitutional.” Like in the UK, if you have the nerve to… Read more »

MG
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MG

I share the concerns that the current health care bills including the lack of real cost controls, additional funding necessary to cover the proposed cost, and building upon some of the worst aspects of the current health care system. Still, the comments by TheGroupGuy and Nate are generally what I have seen from the right on health care reform. No comprehensive reform but baseless retorts and piecemeal ideas. Instead it is spouting crap about “death panels” and attacking old liberal stereotypes really largely have been antiquated since the 1970s. Some of these piecemeal ideas should merit serious consideration including the… Read more »

Nate
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Nate

The way statistics are abused on this site is criminal. I would have hoped they taught you in grad school you can’t measure the poverty of retired people by their income. When someone retires and stops working you need to measure their assets. For when you do a meaningful analysis you get results like this; “However, data submitted for the record from a 1960 University of Michigan study showed that “87 percent of all spending units headed by persons aged 65 or older” had assets whose median value matched asset ownership of people aged 45-64 and exceeded the asset ownership… Read more »