Matthew Holt

Jon Cohn: Obsessed with baseball and a hopeless optimist

Jon thinks that Baseball Teaches Us (something) About Health Care Reform. Replace the star player with a bunch of utility infielders, and we’ll still win the pennant. Don’t worry Jon, Daschle isn’t the only one who came in with high hopes and didn’t make it through the week. So long Luiz Felipe!

But more importantly, unity (for the bailout) is a bust already, less than two full weeks into the Obama Administration with only 3 Republican Senators prepared to buck Rush Limbaugh, and then at a pretty big cost to the President and common sense. As Krugman pointed out today, bipartisanship is a crock, with the Republicans telling Obama to go whistle despite his bail-out package being less in total and way less in degree than a centrist Democrat would want. He left in all those tax cuts to please Republicans and they dissed it anyway.

So what would the Republicans do if serious health reform came up for discussion? I think I know! And if Obama starts with an already watered-down plan, it’ll just get more watered down.

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Deron S.JamesRoger CollierPeter Recent comment authors
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Peter
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Peter

James, only assuming this “recession” is like the others. I think health IT investment will be a waste if we’re trying to reduce heath costs and increase patient outcomes, maybe your support is your “pork”. Certainly kick starting much of what we have lacked may be a good thing to put us in the right direction, but I don’t know what fundamantals will change after we spend this money, Americans are largly tapped out and deep in debt (in more ways than one). I would like to pay for this as we went along, such as an energy tax, but… Read more »

James
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James

Quote “spending most of the “stimulus” money long after the recession will likely be over,” How will you know when the recession is over? What’s your measurement. End quote Well, let’s look at modern U.S. history since 1973 (35 years) and note that our recessions average 11 months or so. We are said to be in month five or so of the current one. Here is a USA Today from 2008 article that lays out our economic history in some detail going back to 1973: http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/2008-10-15-3382625071_x.htm Look at the stats for five recessions, which are: 8 months, 8 months, 16… Read more »

Peter
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Peter

“spending most of the “stimulus” money long after the recession will likely be over,” How will you know when the recession is over? What’s your measurement. I was against the TARP and as I see how the last administration gave money to banks without any oversight while the bonuses and perks continued I am cold to the next part. This country has neglected so many necessary projects over the last 25 years from infrastructure to energy efficiency while we went on an unsustainable borrowing glut for over valued homes, new cars every 3 years, Wall Street compensation and bonuses, tax… Read more »

Deron S.
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What happens if one day foreigners stop lending to us? Then strategies like the “stimulus” bill will not be possible. I guess we’ll worry about that when the time comes.

James
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James

Why should many of the same GOP senators who voted against the $700 billion TARP when proposed by a GOP president now be faulted for also opposing an $800+ billion bailout bill proposed by his Democrat successor? Is “unity” voting for something both you AND the people who elected you think stinks? Understand, their constituents hate the bill. They are communicating their displeasure by huge margins. Elected officials, once in a while, note it when the folks back home are contacting them really, really steamed about something. Objectively, the bill has big-time problems which include: spending most of the “stimulus”… Read more »

Roger Collier
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Roger Collier

There’s a big difference between the departures of Scolari and Daschle. (Yes, I understood Matthew’s allusion to Luiz Felipe Scolari, fired as manager of England’s Chelsea soccer team this week!) Scolari’s successor should need only to make the pieces of his team work better together. The individual members of the team are good enough, what’s needed at Chelsea is better orchestration. In contrast, Daschle’s successor (if that’s the word for the replacement for someone who was never in place) needs to start by throwing out most of the major pieces of Daschle’s reform plan. (I’ve expressed my doubts about the… Read more »

Peter
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Peter

Economically Americans have yet to shake the Reagan/Republican myth that low taxes (especially for the rich), conspicuous consumption, and debt financing is the solution. They also cling to the myth that the private sector will bring us affordable and accessable healthcare. They just want the return of their used to be $600,000 valued 2 bedroom California bungalow. Famous Alaskan saying; “Dear lord just give us one more oil boom and I promise I won’t piss it away again.”