Uncategorized

Most Doctors Want A National Health Plan

Six in ten U.S. physicians support a national health plan to achieve universal coverage.

Physicianswantnhi736765
A 2002 poll among American doctors was updated in 2007 to determine how physicians’ feelings about national health insurance (NHI) may have changed in the 5 year period.

In 2002, 49% favored a national plan. In 2007, 59% supported such a plan.

The chart on the left details findings by physician specialty. Not surprisingly, more generalist doctors favor a national health plan compared to specialists, although there is still support for national insurance by a plurality of specialists and the support has grown over five years.

Psychiatrists, long supporting mental health parity in American health financing, are at the vanguard of NHI support. Pediatricians, emergency doctors, and internists make up the over-50% crowd in support of NHI.

The emergency physicians’ support for NHI has dramatically grown since 2002, probably due to the fact that these clinicians are at the forefront of caring for the uninsured. They see firsthand that uninsurance and underinsurance often drives consumers to the ER. A recent study at Harvard published in Health Affairs found that overcrowding in emergency rooms has led to those with the most urgent conditions being at-risk.

Jane’s Hot Points: Physician support of national health insurance is nothing new. For over twenty years, Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) has focused its mission on achieving a single-payer system in the U.S. Today, PNHP has more than 15,000 members throughout the U.S.

That more physicians are joining the ranks of people in search of universal coverage moves the concept way past the tipping point in the U.S.

Livongo’s Post Ad Banner 728*90

Categories: Uncategorized

Tagged as:

25
Leave a Reply

25 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
12 Comment authors
Rajat Dhameja, MBBS, MHAFHFMARajat DhamejamattAIV Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Rajat Dhameja, MBBS, MHA
Guest
Rajat Dhameja, MBBS, MHA

Universal Healthcare, Single Payer System or National Health Insurance……different names for the single most important outcome i.e provide quality healthcare to all US Residents. Not state of the art healthcare only to some, not experimental robotic surgeries to others ….but healthcare across the board. Overtime, we will develop a population that lives longer than Sardinians, Okinawans and other centenerians

FHFMA
Guest

I was looking to start my own blog on healthcare finance and found this one. What I find most interesting about these discussions is that the people doing the discussing are generally not healthcare finance people. How come no one asks us? I wonder if people really understand how much it costs a hospital to get paid for the services we perform. I have been in healthcare finance for the last 25 years (non-profit community) and I can tell you that if we had a single payer system (not a national health care plan) the cost of healthcare would drop… Read more »

Rajat Dhameja
Guest
Rajat Dhameja

Whether or not physicians are in favor of Universal Health Coverage will be relevant after such a system is implemented and matures over time. Without practicing in such a proposed system and fully understanding the pros ad cons thereafter, the assumptions will hardly build a case for a single payer system.

matt
Guest
matt

This study is 100% Bunk! The doctors who did this study also conducted one in 2002 and found that the majority of doctors did not want national health care, the problem with this is that the 2 question surveys drastically differ in there 2nd question. I found this article, 60% of Physicians Surveyed Oppose Switching to a National Health Care Plan, It’s worth a read.

Peter
Guest
Peter

Even though the url string above disappears on the right I found if you just highlight as far to the right as you can and copy, it will paste ok to open the link.

Peter
Guest
Peter

I did some searching. This may help if it’s the proper study but Jane will have to comment. I enlarged the image and traced the study. Below is a link of the study (I think) summary which discusses how it was conducted.
http://www.annals.org/cgi/content/summary/139/10/795?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=national+health+insurance&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT
Here is link for full PDF:
http://www.annals.org/cgi/search?fulltext=national+health+insurance&sendit.x=9&sendit.y=5
Comments now Eric?

AIV
Guest

In the case of a national health insurance, I would imagine that there would be fewer physicians that would be against it rather than for it. I can see why there would be an increase in physician supported in the group of ER doctors because you are right in saying that they do see most of the uninsured patients, but I have a hard time believing that other doctors would want this to happen. The reason for my previous statement is that if we were to function under a single payer system, much of the competition would die down and… Read more »

Tex B.
Guest

Since there seems to be a general debate about which poll numbers are accurate, I decided to look at the Wall Street Journal’s web site. Sure enough, they have posted a WSJ/Harris poll taken in March 2008 about healthcare coverage on the national level. I certainly trust their numbers, as Harris and the Wall Street Journal are credited with effective polling techniques. Anyway, two of the results are: 1. 60% of Americans think it is the government’s job to insure that all Amneicans have adequate health coverage. 31% oppose this. 2. 45% of those polled trust the Democrats to reform… Read more »

Peter
Guest
Peter

No adam, 29% favor and 39% oppose. How do you get to add the 31% not sures to the oppose column? Must be the Rush Limbaugh math.
“Twenty-nine percent (29%) of American adults favor a national health insurance program overseen by the Federal Government. A Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that 39% oppose such a government-led initiative while 31% are not sure.”

adam
Guest
adam

I know this must come as a shock to the denizens of liberal bastions like NYC, SF, LA, DC, and Boston. Like Pauline Kael once said (I paraphrase): I don’t know how Nixon could have won. Everyone I know voted for McGovern. Like Obama, you all are totally out of touch. The overwhelming majority (and 71% is overwhelming) does not want a government-run HC monopoly. I predict that, if the Dems manage to impose such as system, that will constitute the beginning of the end of the Democratic Party. America will never forgot or forgive such a wrenching and coercive… Read more »

adam
Guest
adam

Simple math my friend: 100% minus 29% (in favor) equals 71% who do not favor (ie, either oppose or are undecided).

Peter
Guest
Peter

Adam, just so I’m not trying to confuse, distract, and muddle, where in the link you provided does it show “71% of Americans do not favor a government run system?

adam
Guest
adam

Thanks Bret, your take is exactly right. Typically lefty tactic is that taken by Peter: introduce unrelated topic in order to confuse, distract, and muddle arguments and facts. The point is, 71% of Americans do not favor a government-run system at present. Even more incredible is the fact that only 16% thought health care quality would improve under government control. As the the doc’s: a single-payer system is sure to discourage medicine as a career among our best and brightest college students. It will all end up like the UK, where the bulk of new physicians must be imported from… Read more »

Catron
Guest

Statistically, this survey is a joke. For it to be representative of the larger physician population, the 2,193 respondents should have been chosen randomly. They were not. This sample of 2,193 physicians is instead a self-selected subset of the original 5,000 chosen from the AMA master file.
And the conclusions of the author (a Board member of PNHP) defy common sense: There are about 800,000 physicians in the U.S. and this guy claims 59% of them (472K) support a nationalized health care system. If this is true, why does PNHP only have 14,000 (less than 2%) members?

Jenny
Guest
Jenny

Public health insurance programs have expanded coverage for the
poor, and government provide essential services to these vulnerable populations.
Despite these efforts, many Americans do not have access to basic medical
care. I believed that politicians should concentrate their energies on this point
Income protection