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HEALTH 2.0: Industry heavyweights meet in San Diego

Dk130x72This meeting held by the Markle Foundation
near San Diego  over two days  last week may turn out to be
the most
important health information and technology policy meeting of the past
5 years.  So I’ll try to choose my words for this post very carefully.
If this increases the length somewhat, I apologize for that in advance.

Why was this meeting significant?  Simply put, the Health 2.0 community was involved. With Microsoft’s Peter Neupert, Google’s Missy Krasner, Adam Bosworth from Keas.com, Esther Dyson, Jamie Heywood from PatientsLIkeMe.com, Karen and Richard from Sophia’s Garden, and representatives from MinuteClinic, Wal-Mart, IntuitDell, eClinicalWorks, and Intel
present and vocal, this meeting had a different, and to my mind more
open atmosphere than any other policy meeting I’ve attended.  It was
not dominated by entrenched large health care enterprises, such as the
academic hospitals, Kaiser, health plans,  the large IT vendors, and
the AMA.  In fact, those organizations were often on the defensive in
the conversation, because they are perceived by some as not making it
easy for consumers to get to the information they want and need.  In
fairness to these and other incumbent groups who were present, I
witnessed a new and a very welcome openness to discuss ways to get the
data into the hands of the consumer.

– Continue this post on the Health 2.0 Blog

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This is how we fix the health insurance problem, and reduce taxes at the same time: What we have is a system of double, triple and quadruple dipping happening here in the United States where Medicare and other health care issues are concerned for the haves, and the have-nots. FIRST: An import tax of 45% levied on all goods and products from foreign countries that involve health care related items. On any line item. From aspirin, to band aids, from pharmaceuticals, to shampoo. From tooth paste to tooth brushes, from combs to eyeglasses. From hearing aids, to prosthetic devices, from… Read more »