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BenjaminJean Paul CardichonPeterGregory D. PawelskiBarry Carol Recent comment authors
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Gregory D. Pawelski
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Gregory D. Pawelski

Selling cancer chemotherapy with concessions creates conflicts of interest for oncologists
http://www.healthyskepticism.org:80/news/2007/Jun.php

Benjamin
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We are creating entertaining health education short films, an innovative website, and launching health education events for young people across the country.
If you are interested in making a financial contribution, please go to the website: http://musicinspireshealth.chipin.com/music-inspires-health

Jean Paul Cardichon
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Jean Paul Cardichon

Approach to Healthcare policy reform and improvement is not getting any easier for the patients or health providers. No one person in government, insurance health organization can come up with an easy “quick fix” solution in the U.S..
Brian Kleppers attmept to illustrate the mess in oncology called The cognitive dissonance of conflicted care is greatly appreciate.

Peter
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Peter

About 30 years ago I read a book titled, “The Politics of Cancer” by Samuel Epstein, MD. The book said the contraction, prevention, and treatment of cancer was primarily a political creation of business and government. He could now write an addendum to the book called, “The Profits Of Cancer”. I think both the politics and profits involved are closely tied to the maintenance of this disease.

Gregory D. Pawelski
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Gregory D. Pawelski

This issue first came to light in testimony at a Medicare Executive Committee meeting in Baltimore, Maryland in December 1999. There was a gastroenterologist in attendance who complained that Medicare had cut his reimbursement for colonoscopies from $400 to $108 and how all the doctors in his large, multi-specialty internal medicine group were hurting, save for two medical oncologists, whom he said were making a killing running their in-office retail pharmacies. Over the last seven years, the New York Times has been on this topic like white on rice, as Brian describes. There was a NYT article in early 2000… Read more »

Barry Carol
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Barry Carol

Good article. My two takeaways from the article, which also apply to all other financial arrangements in healthcare and elsewhere are: (1) incentives matter, and (2) beware of unintended (and unwanted) consequences. As policymakers contemplate changes to our healthcare system, hopefully, they will take those two fundamental economic principles into consideration.