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ShawnjdPeterR. Oakleyjohn Recent comment authors
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Shawn
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For sure we need a health care reform but I dont think the politicians should use this a stepping stone.

Peter
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Peter

“My understanding is that the issue is eligibility. These are people that would otherwise be uninsured.” Well I guess there goes the problem – how do we provide a system that makes sure everyone gets affordable healthcare so people don’t have to resort to fraud. Another way families game the system is for the husband and wife to divorce. The partner with the high medical bills declares little to no income and gets free care with no bankruptcy problems. You see when one family member gets sick they drag the entire family down financially. Great system eh.I would be for… Read more »

Barry Carol
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Barry Carol

JD, I appreciate your insight into the Medicaid fraud issue into New York. I would be interested in any ideas you have that New York (state or city) could implement to mitigate Medicaid fraud by providers, aside from significantly increasing its audit staff. Does the state track, for example, aggregate payments to individual providers and compare those to what might be typical for a solo or small group physician practice? Does it try to cross check provider payments against income reported on tax returns (net of normal practice expenses)? I understand that some states (Texas, I think, was an early… Read more »

jd
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jd

Barry, I have to side with those who say that fingerprinting is the wrong way to go, at least with the NY Medicaid population. First, it will absolutely intimidate many and come across as an attempt to gather information on possible criminal activity aside from falsifying Medicaid eligibility. Some people who are eligibile will not sign up. If our goal is to get everyone who is eligible and reduce uninsurance (that is the goal, right?) then this is a mistake. Second, there are many problems with NY Medicaid, but fraudulent eligibility is not one of them, to my knowledge. Instead,… Read more »

Barry Carol
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Barry Carol

Peter, My understanding is that the issue is eligibility. These are people that would otherwise be uninsured. New York City also has a very large immigrant community. Separately, I don’t view fingerprinting as treating people like criminals. I work in financial services, and many of us are routinely fingerprinted as a condition of employment. My son worked for the Department of Defense for six years in a position that required a high level security clearance. Not only was he fingerprinted as a condition of employment, but every five years, he (and others in similar positions) have to pass a CIA… Read more »

Peter
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Peter

>>>”New York City started to require fingerprinting of Medicaid recipients to reduce fraud.”
Barry, how were medicaid reipients receiving cash for medical treatment – or were they just getting medical treatment from medicaid but were not eligible? I guess if the answer is for the latter I would want to know why they couldn’t/wouldn’t get medical treatment from other than medicaid?

R. Oakley
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R. Oakley

Reasonable to prove who you say you are? Absolutely.
Reasonable to intimidate those who are not in any way trying to game the system by treating them like criminals who have to prove they’re not guilty? Absolutely not.
Why is it that we always think only of the guilty and in doing so punish the vast majority of innocents? Because punishment is all we seem to know how to do.

john
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john

If you live in New York and you don’t understand why fingerprinting Medicaid recipients is a politically unacceptable alternative, you just don’t understand the way this city works. Either way, it would be much better to use a higher tech method like a secure digital ID card.
Or perhaps you’d prefer we use RFID tags?

Barry Carol
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Barry Carol

According to a recent article in the New York Post, New York City started to require fingerprinting of Medicaid recipients to reduce fraud. Governor Spitzer, however, put a stop to the practice. If he’s interested in reducing fraud, this was not a good move. As a taxpayer, I do not think it is unreasonable to require applicants for government benefits of any kind to be prepared to prove that they are who they say they are. For means tested benefits (including Medicaid), government should have the best possible tools to verify income and residency. If people don’t like it for… Read more »