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Joseph PadudaRon Greinergadfly Recent comment authors
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Ron Greiner
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Joe, calm down. You wrote, //”most costs are incurred by people who spend way more than their health spending account would hold,// I’m sorry Joe, there is no maximum limit or balance in an MSA or HSA. Some of the first MSAs have balances of $50,000 with deductibles of between $4,500 and $5,200. Go look in the mirror Joe when you talk about sloppy writing. Joe you continue, //”There is ample evidence that the costs of the uninsured are borne by private payers; in fact about a thousand dollars of the average family’s insurance premium goes to pay for uncompensated… Read more »

Joseph Paduda
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Joseph Paduda

Ron – jeez, a lot of anger there. I’m interested in your characterization and purpose thereof. Does it help for you to label people so you can apply your preconceived notions to them, thereby eliminating the need to think? Now, on to your points. Note that I never mentioned HSAs in my post, for the simple reason that they are essentially identical to MSAs, with the notable difference that HSAs have succeeded MSAs in most states. But, for purposes of describing the vehicle and its impact on health care costs, there is no difference. You also attribute words to the… Read more »

Ron Greiner
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Matthew you wrote, // Indeed, no one supporting HSAs has ever done the maths. I’m reading the Cato book in vain. Thanks for writing this, and I’ve linked over to you. Posted by: Matthew Holt at September 22, 2005 01:20 PM // Not true Matthew. Let’s look at the math again – OK? The average premium for employer based coverage is $10,880 a year, per family, in 2005. A 30 year old couple with 2 children can get HSA heath insurace for just $163 a month in Lansing, MI. Once a family saves more in premium than the size of… Read more »

gadfly
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gadfly

Great comment on how individual “responsibility” rationing ultimately costs everyone more.
There’s a remark about brand differentiation as a means of growth in one of the links, and that bothers me. Ultimately, good health care is good health care: it’s all the same “product”. To try to suggest difference through branding seems like a blatant attempt to achieve growth through manipulating public perception as opposed to actually making a better mousetrap. Isn’t the better mousetrap the justification for a market-driven economy?