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HEALTH PLANS: Perhaps you shouldn’t click on every Google Ad, with UPDATE on underinsurance

As you may or may not have noticed, in a (mostly failing) attempt to see whether I can make any money back off this blog, I’ve been running Google Adsense down on the left column. A certain commenter, let’s call him Ron, suggested to me that this is an attempt for me to build my own insurance empire. While that may betray Ron’s misunderstanding of how Adsense works (and look here for an amusing version of the same), one of the ads that ended up on THCB was for a very dodgy insurance company that wasn’t so nice.  Take a look and of course caveat emptor.

UPDATE: Meanwhile, Health Affairs today has a Commonwealth Fund study that estimates the number of underinsured at 16 million. By my very casual glance at the Press release it seems that they may only be talking about those with inadequate insurance who actually needed it. My guess is that overall underinsurance (e.g. not having enough to pay the bills in the case of a bad trauma) is much greater.  But then again, it’s the flow of people through un- and under- insurance that’s such a big issue, with more than 80m uninsured for at least 3 months in a 4 year period.

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Ron GreinerLinjibSueRick Recent comment authors
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Ron Greiner
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Ron Greiner

Rick, you wrote, “I mean, the people’s coverage capped his chemotherapy at $1,000 a day. That’s $365,000 a year. I’d hardly call that poor coverage” You sound like one of their salespeople. Also, I would submit that there are more than just a few hundred people that could take one painting off the wall and sell it and pay that amount. Matthew the last thing these people need is to focuse on what they are doing. The guy in charge said that this could affect their stock price. They have very deep pockets so at least be aware. The no… Read more »

Lin
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Lin

A market based system that restricts pre-existing refusals, is community( as opposed to experience) rated, and guarantted issue would look like New York – some of the highest rates in the country. Also some of the best hospitals, albeit in a pretty confined area (Manhattan) and many many docs no longer on ANY MC panels. The HSA has to process claims under the deductible because they are paid out of the HSA at the UCR rate. The great cost driver is all that administration needed to count the beans. When I am speaking to groups I put it this way:… Read more »

jib
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jib

Actually, I’m pretty sure that Adwords lets you filter out sponsors you don’t want to be associated with. Probably a good idea to go ahead and do that. People should keep an eye out for any other potential problems and report them. I guess thats a good excuse to click on the links and support THCB! Anyway, the Internet advertising market for insurance seems like an interesting topic. I’m wondering what kind of oversight there is for companies like this? Do any special regulations apply on the web? I’m betting not many people are paying attention. And that there are… Read more »

Sue
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Sue

I think the short answer is that our current system so divorces most people from any cost responsibility for their health care that they don’t read the fine print because they haven’t had to go through a worse case cost scenario. Most people shopping the individual market have gotten coverage through employers for most of their adult lives. Faced with the premium cost of low deductible plans they look for lower cost options which may or may not provide the coverage they need and can afford over time. People with employer-provided health insurance don’t see a problem because they’ve never… Read more »

Rick
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Rick

I’m always conflicted on this kind of story. As you read it, on the one hand you have to ask, why didn’t these folks read the fine print, and why didn’t they remember the old adage that anything that sounds too good to be true probably is. On the other hand, why does ANYTHING cost $18,000 a day? The number of people who can pay cash for that in this country probably only numbers in the hundreds. I mean, the people’s coverage capped his chemotherapy at $1,000 a day. That’s $365,000 a year. I’d hardly call that poor coverage, unless… Read more »