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Tag: Vaccine

What, Us Worry

By KIM BELLARD

2020 has been an awful year.  Hurricanes, wildfires, murder hornets, unjustified shootings, a divisive Presidential election, and, of course, a pandemic.  Most of us are spending unprecedented amounts of time sheltering in place, millions have lost their jobs, the economy is sputtering, and over a quarter million of us didn’t survive to Thanksgiving.  If you haven’t been depressed at some point, you haven’t been paying enough attention.

Within the last two weeks, though, there has finally been some cause for hope.  Whether you want to credit Operation Warp Speed or just science doing what it does, we are on the cusp of having vaccines to battle COVID-19.  First Pfizer/BioNTech, then Moderna, and most recently, AstraZenica, announced vaccines that appear to be highly effective. 

We’re having our Paul Revere moment, only this time with good news.  The vaccines are coming!  The vaccines are coming!

It strikes me, though, that our enthusiasm about these vaccines says a lot about why the U.S. has had such a hard time with the pandemic; indeed, it tells us a lot about why our healthcare system is in the state it is. We’re suckers for the quick fix, the medical intervention that will bring us health.

Unless you were alive when Woodrow Wilson was President, COVID-19 has been the worst public health crisis of our lifetime.  It took some time for us to fully realize how bad it was going to be, and, even then, most of us underestimated exactly how bad that would be.  We may still be underestimating how bad these next few months will be.

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Addressing Unapproved Meningitis Vaccine at Princeton

Emergency doses of a meningitis vaccine not approved for use in the U.S. are likely to be on the way to Princeton University to halt a meningitis outbreak that has already sickened seven students. There are approved meningitis vaccines available, but they do not protect against Meningitis B—a strain not covered by the shots given in the U.S. and not a strain prevalent here.

Government health officials said Friday they have agreed to import Bexsero, a vaccine licensed only in Europe and Australia that does protect against meningitis B.  And that decision seems entirely reasonable given the threat that this nasty strain of meningitis poses.

That said, the question arises — what should those getting the vaccine be told?  Are they being offered a proven vaccine, an experimental vaccine, a vaccine believed to be the best choice given the threat of an epidemic or something else?  Can a student, campus worker or faculty member refuse the vaccination and stay in school or in a dorm?  Should those who have visited the campus recently be tracked down and offered the vaccine?  If people do refuse should they identify themselves in anyway as unvaccinated and to whom?

In general when using a drug or device that has not been approved by the FDA or other federal advisory agencies those who are offered the vaccine should be treated more as research subjects than patients.  They should be told all the facts about the vaccine, why it has not been approved in the U.S. and about the all too real threat that meningitis poses.  They should be given the opportunity to ask questions.  There is a duty to try and monitor those who get the vaccine or a representative sample of such persons, to watch for both efficacy and safety.  Vaccine refusal might be accepted, herd immunity could help in this regard, but university officials will need a policy concerning refusers and where they ought to go to study, live and work until the potential epidemic subsides.

Using a vaccine very likely to be safe and effective to stave off an outbreak of a nasty disease makes good moral sense.  However, it is important to treat emergency use as such and to do what can be done to inform subjects, track the results in those who are vaccinated and to find a path for those who will not accept vaccination.

Arthur Caplan, Ph.D. is head of the Division of Bioethics at New York University Langone Medical Center. This post originally appeared in bioethics.net blog.

The Great Influenza of 2013?


The CDC has noted an early and nasty start to the flu season. Perhaps their own website has caught it, because as I’m writing this, the whole thing is down. Assuming it recovers, I will insert relevant links per routine. Otherwise, I wish it well, and leave you to find your way there on your own.

It’s a bit soon to say, but the virus and the outbreak pattern at this point seem to resemble those of the 2003-2004 flu season, in which nearly 50,000 Americans died. At least two children have already died of flu complications this fall.

This is not the sort of stuff a public health physician can ignore.

So, I recently noted on LinkedIn andTwitter that I’ve been vaccinated — as I am every year — and recommend this year’s vaccine, which appears to match the prevailing viral strain quite well, to everyone else. I promptly got comments back from naysayers, including at least one self-identified microbiologist, who noted he never got vaccinated, and had “never gotten the flu.”

I believe him. But this is like that proverbial “Uncle Joe” everyone knows, who smoked three packs a day and lived to be 119. It could happen — but I wouldn’t bet the farm on it. Uncle Joe is that rare character who somehow comes away from a train crash with a minor flesh wound. The rest of us are mortal.

But there is something more fundamentally wrong with the “I’ve never gotten the flu, and therefore don’t need to be vaccinated” stance than the Uncle Joe fallacy. Let’s face it — those who were ultimately beneficiaries of smallpox or polio immunization never had smallpox or polio, either. If they ever had, it would have been too late for those vaccines to do them any good.

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