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Tag: substance use disorders

Inside Boulder Care’s $36 Million Series B & Scaling Telehealth Addiction Treatment in Medicaid

BY JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

Telehealth addiction treatment clinic Boulder Care just closed a $36 million Series B. I’ve got Founder & CEO Stephanie Strong here to talk about the virtual care company’s medication-assisted approach to opioid and alcohol use disorder treatment, and its growing-bigger-by-the-day presence in the Medicaid market.

In fact, more than 95% of Boulder Care’s revenue comes in from Managed Medicaid plans, and this focus on making medications like Suboxone accessible to traditionally marginalized patients is not only better for patients (drugs like these can cut all-cause mortality rate by half or more) but also compelling for payers. Stephanie says patients suffering from opioid addiction who go untreated are 550% more expensive to the plan than those who are not, and these types of medications facilitate recovery by making it bearable, blocking withdrawal symptoms.

We get into the details behind Boulder Care’s approach, which includes a number of wrap-around support services, including those provided by the startup’s care delivery team that is set to grow as a result of this Series B funding. And speaking of scaling… Does Stephanie have any concerns about challenges that Boulder Care might face prescribing-and-managing controlled substances as a result of the scrutiny created by Cerebral’s bad behavior? Any additional concerns about changes to the clinic’s telehealth practices when the Covid19 public health emergency comes to an end? And…what about competition in this space?? Particularly as similar-looking Bicycle Health announced its $50 million Series B just days earlier? A great inside look at how virtual care is changing the specialized mental health care space.

Health Care Must Open More Doors to Mental Health Patients

Benjamin F. Miller, PsyD
Arpan Waghray, MD

By ARPAN WAGHRAY, MD and BENJAMIN F. MILLER, PsyD

If someone we love has a physical ailment, we can list a variety of places for them to seek care: a clinician’s office, a pharmacy, an urgent care clinic, a school health clinic, an emergency department — the list goes on.

And, in every case, we would feel confident the clinicians in those places would know how to handle the case — or at least know where to send the patient if they need more intensive or specialized care.

But, sadly, the same isn’t true for a loved one with a mental health or substance misuse need, even thought mental health problems are more prevalent than many physical conditions.

As deaths of despair from drug or alcohol misuse or suicide continue to rise, we need a comprehensive, coordinated “no wrong door” approach that fully integrates mental health into the health care system and beyond. We need to transform our clinical practice, creating more options for care and putting mental health and substance use patients’ best interests first. Policy and payment reform must happen to make this new vision of care possible.

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