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Jonathan Bush Launches Zus with $35M & “Build-Your-Own EMR” Proposition for Health Tech Startups

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

Jonathan Bush has “More Disruption Please-d” himself and is back at it with a new company, Zus (get it…like the father of Athena) backed by a $35M Series A led by Andreessen Horowitz, F-Prime Capital, Maverick Ventures, & Rock Health.

“It’s ‘Build-A-Bear’ for EMR, patient relationship management, CRMs…” says Jonathan, and meant to help digital health startups work around incumbent EMR companies by providing a developer kit of components common to the “middle” of a health tech stack — AND a single shared record backend where all Zus clients can land and access patient data.

The intention is to help digital health startups reduce the time and cost of developing their tech by eliminating the redundant, generic aspects of building a healthcare tech stack in the same way companies like Stripe or Twilio have taken the burden out of writing code to process payments or integrate messaging. Zus intends to be the go-to for code used to make an appointment, create a patient profile, connect to a telehealth platform, etc. And the shared record on the back end? Does that make Zus a next-gen EMR company?? Find out more about Zus’s business model, current client list, and why, exactly, Jonathan believes that NOW is the time that the dream of the shared patient medical record is within reach.

Firefly Health’s CEO & Exec Chairman on $40M Raise & Becoming a “Bloat-less Kaiser”

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

Virtual-first primary care company Firefly Health is becoming a health plan! Backed by a $40M Series B, CEO Fay Rotenberg and Executive Chairman Jonathan Bush stop by to explain how they’re providing “half-price healthcare that’s twice as good.” (Or, as only Jonathan can put it: “we’re a bloat-less Kaiser.”) All kidding aside, some big-name health innovation investors are not only behind this raise (Andreessen Horowitz led, F-Prime Capital and Oak HC/FT dipped back in), but also this idea to wrap a benefit around Firefly’s digitally-driven comprehensive care model. Already in-market, the new benefit-plus-care product is aimed squarely at mid-sized/small, fully-insured employers – shops with 50-500 employees which, right now, have limited options for dramatically changing their healthcare spend or being able to build out their own benefits the same way large self-insured employers can.

Fay and Jonathan get into the details about how they’re extending their “Marie Kondo-ing” of healthcare delivery – which has thus far netted some pretty impressive health outcomes, cost savings, and a 92 Net Promoter Score – into healthcare financing.

BONUS: Tune in around 25:30​ and stick around for a few minutes as Jonathan weighs in on the health tech funding boom, how it compares to the EMR arms race days of ole, and whether or not he thinks he can beat Glen Tullman’s $14.5B valuation if/when Firefly goes public. HA!

More Disruption from Jonathan Bush…This Time It’s Primary Care | Jonathan Bush, Firefly Health

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

Health tech rabble-rouser, Jonathan Bush, marked his return to digital health with an appearance on the Health 2.0 stage, and quick chat with WTF Health about his new role as Executive Chairman at Firefly Health. As if conquering EMRs wasn’t enough, JB’s planning on disrupting primary care for his second act. With $10.8M series A funding and a huge addressable market, this may not be such a crazy idea after all. So, what made us miss this guy so much during his year-long hiatus from health tech? Just watch. This interview goes from the “Kabuki theater of the doctor’s office visit” to “Marie Kondo-ing” healthcare to Machiavelli and universal healthcare’s impact on the health tech market. Welcome back, JB.

Filmed at the Health 2.0 Conference in Santa Clara, CA in September 2019.

Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 95 | Health 2.0 Wrap-Up Edition

Jess and I are at Health 2.0 for Episode 95 of Health in 2 Point 00! To wrap up the conference, Jess and I talk about Jonathan Bush’s reappearance in health care on the stage at Health 2.0, with Firefly Health, with echoes of this direction in primary care by Tony Miller on the insurance panel. We talk about all the winners at Health 2.0, including the RWJF Challenge winners, Ooney with Prehab Pal and Social AI Impact Lab, and Omny who won Launch. My favorites from the conference were Indu Subaiya’s Unacceptables panel with two amazing speakers, Melissa Hanna, CEO of Mahmee & Joia Crear Perry, Founder and President of the National Birth Equity Collaborative. Catch highlights from Jess’s panel on social movements in health care as well! —Matthew Holt

Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 30

Jessica DaMassa asks me about Jonathan Bush’s exit and the future of Athenahealth, celebrity suicide and the future of mental health apps, and who Amazon/Buffet/Chase should choose to be their CEOMatthew Holt

Health in 2 point 00, Episode 22

In this edition of Health in 2 point 00 the tables are turned! Jessica DaMassa is at the upstart HLTH conference, which will make those of you with long memories of the first ehealth bubble laugh. So today I’m asking Jessica the questions, including whether Jonathan Bush likes the buyout idea, what Alex Drane (Walmart’s most extraordinary cashier) said, and whether there was anything about sex at HLTH or whether that was just at YTHLive!–Matthew Holt

Jonathan Bush Interview at Health 2.0

Hello THCB Readers, I’m Jessica DaMassa. At Health 2.0’s Fall Conference, Matthew Holt and Indu Subaiya set me up with a camera crew and open access to the influencers, leaders, investors, and startups who graced the stage at this November’s meeting in Santa Clara. Over the course of two days, I asked more than 60 different interviewees from across the health continuum to share their point-of-view on the future of healthcare. Our goal was to capture the “state-of-play” in health innovation and contribute as many answers as possible to that elusive question: What’s going to be disrupted next?

All 60+ interviews are available for your guilty binge-watching pleasure on Health 2.0 TV, or you can stay tuned to THCB as we share some of the best-of-the-best. If you have any recommendations for future interviews (live or online), or want me to talk to you, I’ll be starting a longer series of interviews including showing tech demos. So please get in touch via @jessdamassa on Twitter. Thanks for watching! —Jessica DaMassa

Jonathan Bush, CEO of AthenaHealth, spoke at Health 2.0’s Fall Conference about the potential of networked medicine as a way to transform both the way healthcare is delivered and consumed. After his panel discussion, we got his take on where we can expect the next big disruption in healthcare. Here’s a hint (and a Jonathan Bush-ism to look out for): “ACO’s are kind of a training bra for becoming your own insurance company…”

Help Us Build a Hospital In the Cloud

jonathan bushSince 2011, over $13 billion in venture funding has flooded into digital health. 2015 alone saw well over 200 digital health companies raise more than $2 million each. From personal DNA tests to on-demand doctor’s visits, startups are taking a page from technology giants (Google, Apple, Amazon) and digital unicorns (Uber, Slack) to bring health care into the internet age.

The consumerization of health care is en fuego(!), and rightfully so. With the rise of high-deductible plans, we as patients have been forced to take on greater financial responsibility for our own health. Adding fuel to the flame, the widespread adoption of internet and mobile tech has evolved patients from passive recipients of care into active managers of care. Health care’s consumerization wildfire is thrilling, and it’s created a perfect breeding ground not only for new models of care delivery to take root, but for entrepreneurs to introduce new tools and apps for the patient and provider alike.

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The Time-Warp

jonathan bushJohn Gage, Sun Microsystem’s fifth employee and its former chief researcher, famously said “the network is the computer.” The majority of us experience this every day through interactions with a wide variety of highly-intelligent, super-connected networks including Facebook, which remembers our friends’ birthdays better than we do; ATM networks, which know instantly if we have the cash that matches our request; and the complex, yet seemingly simple interweaving of phone networks, which allows us to communicate smartphone-to-smartphone regardless of carrier. Sadly, healthcare struggles to grasp this important concept.

Earlier this month, I flew to Utah for a conference hosted by KLAS, a major healthcare research outfit, about interoperability. Interoperability is a clunky word that’s talked about endlessly in healthcare, but at its root is an important notion: health care information needs to flow freely. Interoperability means that important information isn’t stuck in proprietary enterprise software that a hospital spent millions of dollars buying years ago. Having this information in the right place at the right time equates to reduced risk of medical errors and makes the delivery of health services more efficient and less costly. I’m convinced more than ever the only way to free information from the silos where it’s currently stranded is for the industry to embrace connectedness by switching to cloud-based, open networks.

The goal is clear. Yet healthcare IT executives and those buying their products remain stuck in the old ways of thinking. In their minds, software is still the computer, and sunk costs keep it so. As such, health information is largely trapped on technology islands that are maintained at great expense onsite at hospitals across our country versus flowing across the care continuum via a universally available information network. Just how bad is the data jam? An Epocrates’ survey earlier this year of nearly 3,000 physicians found that only 14 percent of physicians can access usable electronic health information across all care delivery sites and six out of 10 doctors, even when in the same organization, aren’t effectively sharing information.Continue reading…

2014 A Healthcare Odyssey

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It might have been the best of times. It could have been the worst of times. But 2014 turned out to be the most mediocre of times. Here’s a recap.

Why did Sebelius resign?

Never make a promise to your kids that you can’t keep. And never project the number of people who will sign up for the exchanges and change your mind, unless you are the CBO. If you have read about the problem of uninsured in the US you might have considered CBO’s original projection that seven million people will sign up on the exchanges within six months of open enrollment a tad conservative. Weren’t there millions and millions, forty million apparently, gagging for healthcare coverage?

The CBO revised the projection to six million in February with the projection date of March 31st coming tantalizingly close. Towards the end of March you could hear the cheers of “roll baby, enroll” getting louder.

On April Fools’ Day, the ACA remained intact, the country had not descended in to civil war and some eight million had signed up for Obamacare.

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