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Tag: George Bush

Government (Or, How My Cousin the President Nearly Killed My Company)

Screen Shot 2014-05-14 at 8.03.26 AMI WAS NOW the CEO of a rising medical data company.We built automated systems to handle the administrative chores for thousands of medical practices. They didn’t buy anything from us. Instead, they subscribed to a service on the Internet.

This was what would later be called a cloud-based service, but in these early days of Internet era, we were still searching for a name for it. My partner Todd used to say in speeches that he would give Polynesian fruit baskets for life to anyone who came up with a single name for the combination of software, knowledge and work that we were selling. We had moved back east and had a new headquarters in a historic brick armory building along the Charles River near Boston.

Our future looked fabulous, except for one problem: My cousin, the 43rd president of the United States, was about to sign a bill that could destroy us.

This bill, like so many governments initiatives, stemmed from the best of intentions. The idea was to encourage the migration of the health care industry from cumbersome binders full of paper to electronic records. How was this to be accomplished? Well, hospitals and doctors were forbidden by so-called anti-kickback laws from exchanging services, information or products of value with each other. (It’s a law that infuriates me, for reasons I’ll go into later.) The bill before Congress in 2004 offered a regulatory safe harbor for hospitals to provide doctors with all the digital technology the bureaucrats could think of: servers, software licences, and training. That was absolutely the right answer . . . for 1982. The long and short was that hospitals could buy all the old stuff from our competitors, but none of the new still-to-be-named services from us. As often happens, the technology was advancing much faster than the law.

I caught the shuttle down to Washington and commenced lobbying with the fervor of a man with a gun to his head. I raced up and down the marble halls Congress, looking for someone, anyone, who would take the time to learn why this bill was so very wrong, so backward, so devastating, so lethal—at least to athenahealth.

But let me tell you, if you walk into Congressional offices sputtering about a clause in a bill that practically no one has read, something that has to do with hardware and software and online services, people tend to hurry away, or point you toward the door. I could find no one to pay attention. And as I grew more frantic, I started talking louder and faster. That didn’t help things.

Some might find my frustration strange, considering that during this drama my cousin was sitting a mile away, in the Oval Office. Wouldn’t a Bush, facing legislative trouble in Washington, contact someone in the White House entourage? The answer is no. Placing a call to him was not even a remote possibility. For starters, it’s unethical. It is also politically foolish. It would place him, me, and my company in scandal and bring shame upon our family. I would be much more willing to climb the steeple of the tallest church and bungee jump naked in the middle of the night than to call my cousin. And even if I were dumb enough to make the call, I trust George would have the good sense to tell me to get lost.

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Missive from the DMZ

Not everything about improving health care is breathlessly hanging on one high stakes decision.

The Supreme Court will rule soon enough on the constitutional challenges to the Affordable Care Act. Meanwhile, even amid the drama and bitter struggles, progress can occur in health care improvement—like the ever increasing adoption of health information technology. Believe it or not, there is broad agreement about using this technology in health care. Scott Gottlieb and J.D. Kleinke in a recent Wall Street Journal opinion said it well, “. . . promotion of health information technology is one of the only demilitarized zones in Washington—consistently attracting bipartisan support . . . .”

So, this rare consensus seems real and durable, but what is actually happening in the hallowed HIT ground where both sides have somewhat oddly come to a policy truce?

Since May of 2004 when President George W. Bush established the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) we’ve witnessed a slow but relentless upturn in adoption. That progress dramatically accelerated with attention and funding in the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act in 2009. Since 2006, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) in collaboration with ONC has supported an ongoing, independent effort to monitor the national adoption of the electronic health record.

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