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Category: Tech

AI competitions don’t produce useful models

By LUKE OAKDEN-RAYNER

A huge new CT brain dataset was released the other day, with the goal of training models to detect intracranial haemorrhage. So far, it looks pretty good, although I haven’t dug into it in detail yet (and the devil is often in the detail).

The dataset has been released for a competition, which obviously lead to the usual friendly rivalry on Twitter:

Of course, this lead to cynicism from the usual suspects as well.

And the conversation continued from there, with thoughts ranging from “but since there is a hold out test set, how can you overfit?” to “the proposed solutions are never intended to be applied directly” (the latter from a previous competition winner).

As the discussion progressed, I realised that while we “all know” that competition results are more than a bit dubious in a clinical sense, I’ve never really seen a compelling explanation for why this is so.

Hopefully that is what this post is, an explanation for why competitions are not really about building useful AI systems.

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The Most Expensive Data in the US & Why we’re NOT Using It | Atul Butte, UC Health

By JESSICA DAMASSA, WTF HEALTH

When you ask the ‘big data guy’ at a massive health system what’s wrong with EMRs, it’s surprising to hear that his problem is NOT with the EMRs themselves but with the fact that health systems are just not using the data they’re collecting in any meaningful way. Atul Butte, Chief Data Scientist for University of California Health System says interoperability is not the big issue! Instead, he says it’s the fact that health systems are not using some of the most expensive data in the country (we are using doctors to data entry it…) to draw big, game-changing conclusions about the way we practice medicine and deliver care. Listen in to find out why Atul thinks that the business incentives are misaligned for a data revolution and what we need to do to help.

Filmed at Health Datapalooza in Washington DC, March 2019.

Jessica DaMassa is the host of the WTF Health show & stars in Health in 2 Point 00 with Matthew Holt.

Get a glimpse of the future of healthcare by meeting the people who are going to change it. Find more WTF Health interviews here or check out www.wtf.health

Announcing Winners for the RWJF Innovation Challenges

SPONSORED POST

By CATALYST @ HEALTH 2.0

Three finalists for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Home and Community Based Care and Social Determinants of Health Innovation Challenges competed live at the Health 2.0 Conference on Monday, September 16th! They demoed their technology in front of a captivated audience of health care professionals, investors, provider organizations, and members of the media. Catalyst is proud to announce the first, second and third place winners.

Home and Community Based Care Innovation Challenge Winners

First Place: Ooney 

Second Place: Wizeview

Third Place: Heal 

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WTF are Digital Therapeutics? | Digital Therapeutics Alliance Executive Director, Megan Coder

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

Digital therapeutics has exploded as the new hot buzzword in digital health. But how are digital therapeutics different from digital health applications, applied health signals, or m-health technologies? The Digital Therapeutics Alliance was formed to answer that exact question. DTA Executive Director Megan Coder sets the record straight, hint: it involves software algorithms.

Filmed at JP Morgan Healthcare in San Francisco, CA, January 2019.

Jessica DaMassa is the host of the WTF Health show & stars in Health in 2 Point 00 with Matthew Holt.

Get a glimpse of the future of healthcare by meeting the people who are going to change it. Find more WTF Health interviews here or check out www.wtf.health

Announcing GuideWell’s Caring for Caregivers Challenge

SPONSORED POST

By CATALYST @ HEALTH 2.0

Caregivers who care for aging, ill and disabled adult family members face a broad array of challenges within their daily lives. These challenges include stress, burnout, financial burdens, career sacrifices, sleep deprivation, depression, isolation, and lack of privacy. GuideWell believes it “takes a village” to sustainably support family caregivers, and that single point solutions are typically not broad enough to provide comprehensive relief to family caregivers.

GuideWell, in collaboration with Catalyst @ Health 2.0, is excited to announce the Caring for Caregivers Challenge — a Health Innovation Challenge that seeks companies or non-profits with programs, platforms, technology systems or services that have the potential to eliminate critical challenges family caregivers face. Comprehensive approaches should connect caregivers to resources, technologies, corporate benefits, and community networks to help them with their unique personal health and wellness needs. Approaches should serve:

1. Family caregivers caring for family members over the age of 65

2. Family caregivers caring for partners or adult children under the age of 65 who  are mentally disabled, permanently homebound due to a physical disability, terminally ill or who suffer from Alzheimer’s, congestive heart & pulmonary disease, cancer, and/or stroke.

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Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 95 | Health 2.0 Wrap-Up Edition

Jess and I are at Health 2.0 for Episode 95 of Health in 2 Point 00! To wrap up the conference, Jess and I talk about Jonathan Bush’s reappearance in health care on the stage at Health 2.0, with Firefly Health, with echoes of this direction in primary care by Tony Miller on the insurance panel. We talk about all the winners at Health 2.0, including the RWJF Challenge winners, Ooney with Prehab Pal and Social AI Impact Lab, and Omny who won Launch. My favorites from the conference were Indu Subaiya’s Unacceptables panel with two amazing speakers, Melissa Hanna, CEO of Mahmee & Joia Crear Perry, Founder and President of the National Birth Equity Collaborative. Catch highlights from Jess’s panel on social movements in health care as well! —Matthew Holt

Health 2.0: Why I’m (Freaking) Excited…and a (Bit) Concerned

By DAVE LEVIN, MD

The 2019 Health 2.0 conference just wrapped up after several days of compelling presentations, panels, and networking. As in the past, attendees were a cross section of the industry: providers, payers, health IT (HIT) companies, investors, and others who are passionate about innovation in healthcare.

Tech-enabled Services

One of the more refreshing themes of the conference was an emphasis on how health IT can enable the delivery of services. This is a welcome perspective as too often organizations believe that simply deploying technology will solve their problems. In my 30+ years in healthcare, I’ve never seen that work. What does work is careful attention to the iron triad of people, process, and technology. Neglect one of these and you will fall short of your goals. Framing opportunities as services that are enabled and enhanced by technology helps us avoid the common pitfall of believing “Tech = Solution” and forces us to account for process and people.

Provider Burn-out and Health IT

Several sessions focused on the impact technology is having on end-users, especially clinicians. One session featured a “reverse-pitch” where practicing physicians “pitched” to health IT experts on the challenges they face, especially with EHRs, and what they need in order to do their job and have a life. This was summed up elegantly by a physician participant as, “Please make all the stupid sh*t stop!” There’s increasing evidence that the deployment of EHRs is a major factor for clinician burnout and the impassioned pleas of the attendees resonated throughout the conference.

Other sessions explored how to we might address these problems with improvements in user-interface design, workflow, and interoperability. Demonstrations of advanced technologies like voice-driven interfaces, artificial intelligence, enhanced communications, and smart devices show where we are headed and hold out the promise of a more efficient and pleasing HIT for providers and patients.

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Why Should Anyone Care About Health Data Interoperability?

By SUSANNAH FOX

This piece is part of the series “The Health Data Goldilocks Dilemma: Sharing? Privacy? Both?” which explores whether it’s possible to advance interoperability while maintaining privacy. Check out other pieces in the series here.

A question I hear quite often, sometimes whispered, is: Why should anyone care about health data interoperability? It sounds pretty technical and boring.

If I’m talking with a “civilian” (in my world, someone not obsessed with health care and technology) I point out that interoperable health data can help people care for themselves and their families by streamlining simple things (like tracking medication lists and vaccination records) and more complicated things (like pulling all your records into one place when seeking a second opinion or coordinating care for a chronic condition). Open, interoperable data also helps people make better pocketbook decisions when they can comparison-shop for health plans, care centers, and drugs.

Sometimes business leaders push back on the health data rights movement, asking, sometimes aggressively: Who really wants their data? And what would they do with it if they got it? Nobody they know, including their current customers, is clamoring for interoperable health data.

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Taking on Facebook for Health Data Privacy: Fred Trotter, CareSet Systems

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

While patients can often find comfort, compassion, and support in Facebook Groups dedicated to their health conditions, they don’t realize that their identity, location, and email addresses can be found quite easily by other members of their closed group — some of whom may not have well-meaning purposes for that information. Called a Strict Inclusion Closed Group Reverse Lookup (SICGRL) attack, this is a privacy violation of unprecedented magnitude. 

Fred Trotter is one of the leaders of a group of activists co-led by Andrea Downing and David Harlow that is taking on Facebook to correct this health data privacy violation. 

While this interview was filmed at Health Datapalooza in the Spring of this year, Fred has just published an update that details how Facebook continues to ignore the issue and remains unwilling to collaborate on a solution. 

Catch up on the background behind this data privacy issue — currently, one of the most important opportunities we as healthcare innovators have to learn about what NOT to do when it comes to user privacy and sensitive data. 

Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 94 | Healthy.io, Smile Direct Club, and Period Tracking?

On Episode 94 of Health in 2 Point 00, Jess asks me about Healthy.io’s $60 million raise for at-home urine testing for kidney diseases, with the NHS on the hook & coming to the US, and Smile Direct Club going public with a $9 billion valuation—but quickly tanked (although to $7 billion). In other news, there’s a period tracker scandal with Maya and MIA Fem apps sharing sensitive data about women’s cycles and sexual activity with Facebook. Find out what Jess & I are looking forward to at Health 2.0 this week as well. See you there! —Matthew Holt

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