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Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 105 | JP Morgan 2020: Virta, Arcadia Health, Teladoc & more

Today on Health in 2 Point 00, Jess and I bring you the first ever cliffhanger episode—money was flying everywhere during JP Morgan last week, so stay tuned for more tomorrow. Jumping right in, on Episode 105 we discuss Virta Health raising $93 million for diabetes reversal treatment in a super secret way; Blue Mesa getting acquired by Virgin Pulse for diabetes prevention; population health analytics company Arcadia Health’s $29.5 million raise; Teladoc acquiring InTouch Health for $600 million, and finally Mona Siddiqui leaving the HHS. —Matthew Holt

Healthcare Might Look Good in Plaid

By KIM BELLARD

I don’t really follow FinTech — I can’t even keep up with HealthTech! — but it caught my eye when Visa announced that it was acquiring FinTech company Plaid for $5.3b; a 2018 funding round valued the company at $2.65b.  A 100% increase in valuation within a year suggests that something important is going on, or at least that people think something is.  

I suspect there may be some lessons for healthcare in there somewhere.  

For those of you who are equally as unfamiliar with FinTech’s terrain, Plaid has been described as the “plumbing” that supports many other FinTech companies.  Launched in 2013, one in four people with a U.S. bank account are now believed to use Plaid to connect with 2,600 FinTech developers connected to more than 11,000 financial institutions.  Its customers include Acorns, Betterment, Chime, Coinbase, Gemini, Robinhood, Transferwise, and Venmo.  Plaid claims it connects with 200 million consumer accounts. 

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Digital Health Experts Needed for Landmark International Forum

SPONSORED POST

By CATALYST @ HEALTH 2.0

The IDIH Project (International Digital Health Cooperation for Preventive, Integrated, Independent and Inclusive Living) is setting up an expert-driven “Digital Health Transformation Forum” to promote and increase international collaboration, advance digital health, and support active and healthy ageing through innovation. IDIH is funded under the European Union Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme and brings together prominent organizations from EU and five Strategic Partner Countries: Canada, China, Japan, South Korea and the USA. 

IDIH is seeking individuals whose expertise is in alignment with the following focus areas: 

1. Preventive careFocus: Early diagnosis and detection

2. Integrated care –  Focus: Using new technologies to redesign, coordinate and integrate health and social services and place citizens, patients and seniors at the centre of health systems

3. Independent and connected livingFocus: Tele-monitoring via smart home and living technologies

4. Inclusive living Focus: Helping the elderly feel more connected socially/ healthy living

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Top 3 Myths About Digital Identity in Healthcare

By GUS MALEZIS

Healthcare is in the midst of a digital transformation, creating information security, compliance, and workflow challenges. The engagement of an increasingly decentralized workforce along with anytime anyplace healthcare and the proliferation of cloud-based applications, databases, and mobile devices have now (or soon will have) eroded the once well-defined network perimeter.

The healthcare industry remains one of the most highly targeted for cyber-attacks – a recent report from Beazley Breach Insights showed that, 41 percent of all breaches in 2018 occurred in the healthcare sector. This means that, going forward, healthcare organizations must pay particular attention to cybersecurity and do so without restricting or compromising access to the systems and services providers and patients are now using and may do in the future. A successful cybersecurity plan requires these organizations to focus on establishing and managing trusted digital identities for all users, applications, and devices throughout the entire extended digital healthcare enterprise – from the hospital, to the cloud, and beyond.

Why are modern hackers targeting healthcare? Because they can, and they have the opportunity to do so! Hackers also know the value of the data stored within provider systems. Today, medical records fetch up to ten times more money on the dark web than the average credit card.  

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For all who hate computers in medicine: here’s what we got before.

By e-Patient Dave DeBronkart

The photo below shows what “visit notes” from a doctor appointment might look like in the era before computers. Just two days before my first speech where I said “Gimme my damn data,” I had an ENT visit, and on the way out I asked for a copy of the doctor’s notes. The clerk snickered out loud and showed it to me, saying, “If you really want it….”

No joke; this is what the doctor had recorded.

Visit notes from my ENT appointment, Sept 15, 2009
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9 Healthcare Companies Who Changed the 2010s

By ANDY MYCHKOVSKY

In order to celebrate the next decade (although the internet is confused whether its actually the end of the decade…), we’re taking a step back and listing our picks for the 9 most influential healthcare companies of the 2010s. If your company is left off, there’s always next decade… But honestly, we tried our best to compile a unique listing that spanned the gamut of redefining healthcare for a variety of good and bad reasons. Bon appétit!

1. Epic Systems Corporation

The center of the U.S. electronic medical record (EMR) universe resides in Verona, Wisconsin. Population of 13,166. The privately held company created by Judith “Judy” Faulkner in 1979 holds 28% of the 5,447 total hospital market in America. Drill down into hospitals with over 500-beds and Epic reigns supreme with 58% share. Thanks to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and movement away from paper records (Meaningful Use), Epic has amassed annualized revenue of $2.7 billion. That was enough to hire the architects of Disneyland to design their Google-like Midwestern campus. The other amazing fact is that Epic has grown an average of 14% per year, despite never raising venture capital or using M&A to acquire smaller companies.

Over the years, Epic has been criticized for being expensive, non-interoperable with other EMR vendors, and the partial cause for physician burnout. Expensive is probably an understatement. For example, Partners HealthCare (to be renamed Mass General Brigham) alone spent $1.2 billion to install Epic, which included hiring 600 employees and consultants just to build and implement the system and onboard staff. With many across healthcare calling for medical record portability that actually works (unlike health information exchanges), you best believe America’s 3rd richest woman will have ideas how the country moves forward with digital medical records.

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Will At-Home Lab Tests Change Healthcare Diagnostics Forever? | Frank Ong, Everlywell

By JESSICA DAMASSA, WTF HEALTH

It used to be that patients would have to go see a doctor to get lab tests ordered to check their cholesterol or metabolism, but now, thanks to at-home testing companies like Everlywell, those tests (and 30 others, including STI tests) can be ordered online or picked up at some big box retailers. We chatted with Dr. Frank Ong, Everlywell’s Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, about what it means to put patients in charge of ordering their own lab work — and combing through their own testing results — vis a vie the Everlywell platform. As consumers demand more control over their healthcare dollar and the experience it buys, is there a point where patients risk getting in over their heads? How have doctors been responding to patients who come in armed with their own lab results? We check in on how at-home testing kits are ‘testing’ the reaches of patient-led care.

Filmed at HLTH 2019 in Las Vegas, October 2019.

THCB Spotlights: Carolyn Magill, CEO of Aetion

Today on THCB Spotlights, Matthew interviews Carolyn Magill, CEO of Aetion. Aetion is a real world evidence analytics company working to accelerate time to regulatory grade insights. In fact, Aetion recently did a study with Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey where they analyzed the type 2 diabetes population, identified a subset of patients who should be on a different class of drugs—which are more expensive—that would improve health outcomes and bring down the total cost of care, saving about $5 million for Horizon. Find out where the data and intelligence for this platform came from, and how this female CEO works to empower women both internally and externally.

A Clinically Validated Game Teaching Mental Health Coping Strategies | Swatee Surve, Litesprite

By JESSICA DAMASSA, WTF HEALTH

How can helping a cartoon fox also help your mental health? Enter Socks the Fox and Sinasprite, a world exploration game that teaches players evidence-based treatments and coping methods for anxiety and depression. How does it work? Litesprite CEO Swatee Surve explains that players are charged with helping Socks the Fox become a Zen master (of course) and, in doing so, work through a series of challenges and exercises that teach coping mechanisms that range from journaling to diaphragmatic breathing. With its super-sticky storyline (Socks is adorable) the clinically validated game offers a new, upbeat way to bring tech and game theory into the way we treat mental health disorders.

Filmed at Bayer G4A Signing Day in Berlin, Germany, October 2019.

Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 103 | ACA Ruling, Sutter Health Settlement, & Bright Health

Today, I’m closing out the year of Health in 2 Point 00 from the ski slopes. In Episode 103, Jess asks me about the ACA ruling that the individual mandate is unconstitutional, whether Sutter Health got what they deserved after the $575 million settlement, health insurer Bright Health raising a huge $635 million round, and a rumor about a $250M Softbank investment coming next week. Wishing you all a very happy 2020! —Matthew Holt

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