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Category: Health Technology

#Healthin2Point00, Episode 211 | Noom, Akili, Unmind, Eleanor Health & Clearing

Today on Health in 2 Point 00, Jess gives us a little tour of Chicago before we dive into some deals. Noom raises $540 million, bringing their total to $657 million with a $4 billion valuation. What are they going to do now with all this money? Digital therapeutics company Akili raises $160 million – maybe this will bring them out of ADHD. Unmind, a mental health company out of the UK, raises $47 million, Eleanor Health raises $20 million for their addiction-focused mental health clinic, and finally Clearing raises $20 million in a Series A tackling chronic pain. —Matthew Holt

Will Google Health Platformize the Electronic Health Record Market?

Geoffrey Parker
Edward G. Anderson
Vince Kuraitis

By VINCE KURAITIS, EDWARD G. ANDERSON, and GEOFFREY PARKER

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated calls for the development of EHR 2.0 (electronic health record 2.0) – the next generation of EHRs with extended platform features and capabilities.

Who will answer this call? While existing EHR vendors have made modest efforts, the door is open for big tech companies and start-ups to develop functionality to envelop and disintermediate current EHRs. We highlight early efforts by Google Health Care Studio, an initiative that has been underway for several years but was only formally named in February 2021. We view Care Studio as having the potential to bring platform functionality to a sector of the healthcare industry known for resistance to change and innovation.

We coin a new term – “EHR Envelopment” to describe novel EHR platform capabilities under development by third parties. By “envelopment,” we mean the entry by one platform provider into another provider’s market by adding functionality and exploiting overlapping user bases. New EHR capabilities threaten to dislodge existing EHRs, e.g. through 1) new user interfaces (UIs) that sit above the current EHR, and/or 2) a focus on new value created by integrating, analyzing, and presenting disparate sources of data.

Through the lens of platform strategy, we focus on the impact that EHR Envelopment initiatives could have on the market for electronic health records for large integrated delivery systems. This market has been dominated by a few vendors for decades, but EHR Envelopment projects have the potential to disrupt EHR market dynamics.

The remaining sections of this essay will address:

  • The Current EHR Market for Health Systems: Ossified
  • Google’s “Care Studio” — What is It?
  • Disrupting and Platformizing the EHR Market
  • Challenges for Google Health
Continue reading…

Teladoc Health’s Mental Health Move: Unite Best of Livongo, Virtual Care in myStrength Complete

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

The Teladoc Health-Livongo merger continues to expand Teladoc Health’s virtual care capabilities — this time in mental health. Dr. Julia Hoffman, Head of Mental Health Strategy for Teladoc Health, gives us the inside story on the launch of myStrength Complete, the souped-up, next-gen version of the digital mental health app that Livongo acquired in 2019 and integrated into its “AI-plus-AI whole person health” platform. So, what’s new now that all this is part of Teladoc? Think full-service mental health care, akin to what you might find in a digital mental health point solution, but with more providers… sitting on top of a gold-standard telehealth and remote monitoring infrastructure… and ready-to-move on an outsized opportunity for integration into Teladoc’s virtual primary care offering, Livongo for Diabetes, Livongo for Hypertension, and so on.

myStength Complete is now more than just a smart, cognitive behavioral therapy app; it’s the entry point into an entire mental health care continuum of services. Teladoc Health’s physicians stand ready for telehealth consults alongside a robust portfolio of coaching and self-service mental health care programs that are bolstered by the data-driven “health nudges” made famous by Livongo’s ever-improving AI-AI engine. Looking forward, the data integration strategy has a lot of potential to do a lot of good. Julia talks about how her team is already leveraging learnings from the Livongo products into a better intake process for members, helping them more quickly, easily, and accurately find the type of care they need. This is no small feat, especially when we find out that Teladoc Health consumer survey data shows that about 60% of people seeking mental health care say they have no idea where to start, or what their diagnosis would be. We get into all those survey findings (a little gold mine for those interested in consumer sentiment and digital mental health) and a full “under-the-hood” poking around of myStrength Complete in advance of its July roll-out to employers. This interview is one to watch now for the full details on how Teladoc Health is pushing further into virtual mental health care.

Holograms to the Rescue

By KIM BELLARD

Google is getting much (deserved) publicity for its Project Starline, announced at last week’s I/O conference.  Project Starline is a new 3D video chat capability that promises to make your Zoom experience seem even more tedious.  That’s great, but I’m expecting much more from holograms – or even better technologies.  Fortunately, there are several such candidates.

For anyone who has been excited about advances in telehealth, you haven’t seen anything yet.

If you missed Google’s announcement, Project Starline was described thusly:

Imagine looking through a sort of magic window, and through that window, you see another person, life-size and in three dimensions. You can talk naturally, gesture and make eye contact.

Google says: “We believe this is where person-to-person communication technology can and should go,” because: “The effect is the feeling of a person sitting just across from you, like they are right there.” 

Sounds pretty cool.  The thing, though, is that you’re still looking at the images through a screen.  Google can call it a “magic window” if it wants, but there’s still a screen between you and what you’re seeing.

Continue reading…

What’s the Latest with Evidation Health?

An email interview with the Co-CEO’s of Evidation Health

Over the last few weeks I’ve been conducting a back & forth email interview with Christine Lemke (L) & Deb Kilpatrick (R), the co-CEOs of Evidation Health. They raised $153 million in a Series E back in March (almost a small round these days!) but I wanted to understand a bit more about what the “new” Evidation was doingMatthew Holt

Matthew Holt: Congrats on the latest funding. Clearly Evidation has evolved since its founding, but focusing first on the clinical trial study aspect, can you explain how the Achievement panel is structured? How was it put together? What are the typical ways that your clients use it, and what is the member experience?

Deb Kilpatrick: Our Achievement platform is the largest virtual connected research cohort in the United States, with more than 4 million users across all 50 states and representing nine out of every 10 ZIP codes. Through the platform, accessible via our app or through a browser, individuals have the opportunity to contribute to ground-breaking medical research in a number of ways: they can connect smartphones, wearables, and connected devices—think Apple Watches, Fitbits, CGMs, etc—that generate heart rate, activity, sleep quality, and other health-related data; they can connect health apps like Strava and MapMyFitness; and they can participate in surveys and provide patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of many forms. 

And they do so with strong privacy protections for both data collection and data use, including use-case specific consents that can be sequential over time. This goes for new Achievers and those who have used the platform for years. And Achievers always have the option to remove themselves from any research project, and/or the platform altogether, at any time.

What do we do with that data? Evidation partners with leading health care companies, including nine of the top 10 biopharma companies in the world, to understand health and disease outside the clinic walls while measuring real world product impact. We’ve conducted virtual trials for almost a decade now, totaling more than 100 real-world studies across therapeutic areas. 

Continue reading…

Will Virtual Care Platforms (VCPs) Become Healthcare’s Mega-Platforms?

Seth Joseph
Vince Kuraitis

By VINCE KURAITIS and SETH JOSEPH

Let’s start with a pop quiz. Take 15 seconds to look at the list below, asking yourself the question “What do all these have in common?”

  • address books
  • video cameras
  • pagers
  • wristwatches
  • maps
  • books
  • travel
  • games
  • flashlights
  • home telephones
  • cash registers
  • MP3 players
  • Day timers
  • alarm clocks
  • answering machines
  • The Yellow Pages
  • wallets
  • keys
  • transistor radios
  • personal digital assistants
  • dashboard navigation systems
  • newspapers and magazines
  • directory assistance
  • travel and insurance agents
  • restaurant guides
  • pocket calculators

The commonality is that all of these were disrupted by smartphones and their operating system (OS) platforms — Google Android and Apple iOS.

Let’s consider a healthcare comparison. Ask yourself, “What do all these have in common?”

  • Primary care
    • Urgent care
    • Office visits
  • Hospitals
    • Inpatient
    • Outpatient
    • ER
  • Specialist access
  • Behavioral health
  • Diagnostics
  • Patient portals
  • Home health services
  • Medication administration\
  • Preventive care
  • mHealth apps
  • EHR functionality/apps, e.g.,
    • Scheduling & check in
    • Billing
    • eRX
    • Medication management
    • Referral management
    • Care planning
    • Care coordination
    • Social care
    • Patient education
    • Patient communications

The commonality is that all of these are potentially disruptable by Virtual Care Platforms (VCPs).

In this essay we ask the question “Will virtual care platforms become healthcare’s mega-platforms?” We believe the potential for such a scenario is strong. We describe and assess parallels between the evolution of the duopoly smartphone operating system (OS) market and the emerging virtual care platform market. Our intent is to describe a plausible scenario for the future – not to make a prediction.

Continue reading…

Special Event: The Catalyst @ Health 2.0/Wipfli Survey on the State of Digital Health Results Presentation

TODAY Tuesday, May 11th at 2pm ET/11am PTRSVP here

Back in November of last year, Catalyst @ Health 2.0, supported by professional services firm Wipfli, launched the Survey on the State of Digital Health, with the goal of creating a comprehensive analysis of the impact of COVID-19 on digital health companies and the rest of the ecosystem. Between the end of 2020 and thru March 2021 we received detailed responses from 300+ digital health aficionados including 180 digital health companies. We’re sure this is the most detailed assessment of what’s happening on the ground in digital health companies you’ll find anywhere.

Join us at 2pm ET/11am PT on Tuesday, May 11th for The Catalyst @ Health 2.0/Wipfli Survey on the State of Digital Health Results Presentation, you’ll see the full results from me & Catalyst’s Elizabeth Brown, hear from Wipfli’s Paul Johnson & Girish Ramachandra, and get reaction to the results from our guests Ryan Johnson, lawyer at Fredrikson & Byron; Sunny Kumar, investor at GSR Ventures;, and digital health CEOs Helena Plater-Zyberk, Supportiv; and Mudit Garg, Qventus.

I think the zoom is full, but you can see it livestreamed below at 11 am PT – 2pm ET – Matthew Holt

#Healthin2Point00, Episode 204 | Vida, Headway, & Neuroelectrics, plus RCM acquires VisitPay

Today on Health in 2 Point 00, I am over the moon excited about Chelsea’s Champion’s League semi-final win. But on Episode 204, we have some big deals to cover too. First, Vida Health gets $110 million in a Series D bringing their total to $188 million. Next, R1 RCM acquires VisitPay for $300 million, integrating patient financial engagement into their revenue cycle management offerings. It’s Mental Health Awareness Month, and mental health startup Headway raises $70 million – do they have a chance in that crowded space? Finally, Neuroelectrics gets $17.5 million for their neurostimulation cap helping with epilepsy and depression. —Matthew Holt

Inside Vida Health’s $110M Series D & Big Push into Digital Mental Health

By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH

It’s another mega-round for a digital health chronic condition management startup, as Vida Health closes its $110M Series D – AND adds a pair of big-name insurers to their cap table. Vida’s Founder & CEO, Stephanie Tilenius, gets into the good news about the funding round, which was led by growth equity fund, General Atlantic, and brought managed care giant Centene (a Vida customer) and multinational insurer AXA into the mix.

Beyond the funding – and the extra “insurance side” endorsement it gives to the virtual chronic condition care space – what’s interesting about Vida now is how its “whole person” approach, which integrates physical health care and mental health care, is very much tilting to mental health these days.

While overall revenue has tripled since last year, Stephanie talks about how the 6000% year-over-year growth for her mental health services has played into that rise, and how the new funding will be used to further expand those offerings.

Does this mean we need to start naming Vida as a competitor to digital mental health companies like Ginger, Modern Health, and Talkspace? And, how does this impact their positioning among the field of other health tech chronic care co’s? For those who may have forgotten, Vida went out the gate with a platform that was designed to treat both the mental-and-physical aspects of chronic disease, while others like Omada and Livongo-now-Teladoc acquired-and-integrated behavioral health providers to augment their physical-first offerings and satisfy customer demands. Will it now prove easier for Vida to scale-up and scale-out, having been built for both “mind and body” from the very beginning? Stephanie’s got her opinion, big plans, and now a treasury to rival those key competitors across both fields of care. Tune in for all the details!

#Healthin2Point00, Episode 203 | Privia goes public, Vocera acquires PatientSafe Solutions & more

Today on Health in 2 Point 00, Jess hardly knows the value of $100 million anymore – is it a salary, is it an entire fund, is it one single round? On Episode 203, Jess and I cover Vocera buying PatientSafe Solutions and Privia going public with a $3.7 billion market cap. Cash-paid healthcare services company Sesame gets $24 million in a Series B, Ceribell gets $53 million in a Series C for its portable EEG, and Summus Global gets $21 million in a Series B providing virtual specialist care. —Matthew Holt

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