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Category: Health 2.0

The New Health Care Experience For Consumers

By HEALTH 2.o                                     SPONSORED CONTENT
We are human and we need health care. These are universal truths. Here’s another one – we are consumers. Consumers who happen to be in a constant state of adapting to new health care protocols. The advent of value-based care over fee-for-service has also seen an emergence of empowered consumers who are not only informed but savvy in their health care decision making. Where do I purchase? From who? How much does it cost? How much can I afford? When do I purchase? What if I need a specialist? The list goes on. Luckily there is an ever-growing group of people and organizations who continue to make the consumer experience streamlined, affordable, and personal. Even in the gravest of scenarios.

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The Next Tech Wave To Impact Personalized Health

The Technology For Precision Health Summit is just around the corner, and it’s the place to discover new digital platforms that will improve the patient experience, and access a deeper insight into the data behind key decisions for treatment and for maintaining health.

Join more than 300 healthcare providers and payers, advocates, developers, investors, entrepreneurs, policymakers, and advocates for the 1-day action-packed summit which includes:

What are you waiting for? Register for the Technology for Precision Health Summit to see healthcare technology demos from some of the most innovative personalized medicine companies, and hear penetrating discussions on precision medicine delivery, innovation in clinical trials, and advances in oncology.

The DNA Tool That You Must See

Most people have no way of accessing DNA-powered insights about themselves, and no way to store and use their genome in ways that they control. Technology for Precision Health Summit demoer Helix solves that by providing the world’s first online store for DNA-powered products where people can explore diverse and uniquely personalized products developed by high-quality partners. After being sequenced once with true next-generation sequencing, the user can query their data on-demand at any time for a large variety of uses.
The costs of DNA sequencing have dropped rapidly, and our understanding of how DNA influences our lives has increased. For partners in the Helix marketplace, DNA now becomes a software problem, not a hardware problem, where a full clinical-grade exome is accessible through an API. Helix handles sample collection, DNA sequencing, and secure data storage so that our partners can integrate DNA insights into products across a range of categories, including ancestry, entertainment, family, fitness, health and nutrition.
Check out a live demo of Helix’s DNA-powered tool from its co-founder Justin Kao during the New Diagnostic and Screening Tools panel session at the Technology for Precision Health Summit. Hear perspectives about the value of personalization, and lessons learned from being at the forefront of an emerging and exciting new consumer market.
Register now for the Technology for Precision Health Summit.

Kenzen’s ECHO Smart Patch Uses Data Improve Health For Users

Innovation in healthcare tech has seen a major influx in recent years given the continued growth in wearables and the potential for the use of data analytics to improve health. Kenzen is making a difference by creating a wearable smart device enabled to monitor a person’s health by utilizing non-invasive sweat analysis. Kenzen’s mission is to impact personal health technology with continuous monitoring of the body through key biomarkers.

In Healthcare, Kenzen has developed the ECHO Smart Patch, a device aimed at “at risk” populations such as the elderly or employees who work in challenging environments, such as miners and firefighters, it is also for high impact athletes, and is being tested by the San Francisco 49ers and University of Kansas athletics department. The Kenzen smart patch provides analysis and monitoring of a person’s hydration levels, vital signs, and other types of bio data in real time. And, the data is sent to smartphones and the Kenzen cloud so that data can be analyzed and learned from.

Reducing costs: Kenzen sees the potential for decreased costs in healthcare. Smart wearable patches can help prevent conditions such as dehydration and hyponatremia. This is possible by obtaining a wealth of data through a real-time assessment of hydration state and electrolyte levels. Using smart patches, people can proactively take control of their health. Doctors can shift their roles to becoming health coaches.

Hear more about Kenzen’s ECHO Smart Patch and see a Live Demo during the New Diagnostic and Screening Tools/Predictive Analytics panel session at the Technology for Precision Health Summit.

Register today before prices increase after this Friday

Moving the Needle to Diversify Health Tech

There is a dire need for the health tech workforce to keep pace with the changing racial makeup of the nation.  According to  the Pew Research Center study,  from 1960 to 2010, the percentages of Americans identifying themselves as Black, Hispanic, Asian, or “other” increased from just 15 percent of the population to 36 percent of the population:

  •       Black: Increased from 10 to 12 percent
  •       Hispanic: Increased from 4 to 15 percent
  •       Asian: increased from 1 to 5 percent
  •       “Other”: Increased from 0 to 3 percent

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AARP Caregiver Quality of Life Challenge Winners Announced!

Roughly one out of every three people in the United States serves as a caregiver for a chronically ill, disabled, or aging loved one at some point in their life*. Not only do most caregivers dedicate a significant amount of time to these duties, 

but they often also work full or part-time jobs to make ends meet. These stresses result in 40-70% of caregivers exhibiting clinically significant signs of depression*. Fortunately, there is an increasing focus on caregiver well being, and now, more than ever, innovation in caregiving has the opportunity to make real change and improve tens of thousands of lives.

The AARP Caregiver Quality of Life Challenge, supported by AARP, and administered by Catalyst @ Health 2.0 in partnership with Mad*Pow, aimed to find tech-enabled solutions designed to help caregivers identify as caregivers, find available resources to ease their burden, and connect with others who can build and strengthen their support systems.

The Challenge, launched at HxRefactored in June 2017, received over fifty applications, with solutions ranging from AI solutions to podcasts and mobile apps. Submitted solutions were judged by our panel of experts, and scored based on how innovative they were, their potential for scalability, the strength of their design, and the potential for impact in the caregiver community. Winners were announced live this morning at Health 2.0’s 11th Annual Fall Conference.
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Big Names, Big Ideas at Health 2.0 Fall Conference

The Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference has harnessed the creativity and passion of health care’s brightest professionals to tackle the industry’s most intractable problems and leverage technology-enabled solutions to drive more compassionate, more accessible patient-centered care.

Check out the full agenda of our eleventh show, Oct. 1-4, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

Our killer line up of speakers covers the full spectrum of healthcare, and includes:

Innovative leaders, including Jason Pyle, CEO of Base Health; Simon Kos, CMO of Microsoft; Aashima Gupta, Global Head, Healthcare Solutions, Google; Brian Otis, CTO of Verily Life Sciences; Daniel Kraft, Founder and Chair of Exponential Medicine; and Jeff Margolis, CEO of Welltok.

Policymakers, such as HHS CTO Bruce Greenstein; ONC National Coordinator Don Rucker; former ONC Director David Brailer; and former U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra.

Patient advocates, including Dave DeBronkart (e-Patient Dave) and Patient Power President Andrew Schorr.

Representatives from more than two dozen major health systems, including UPMC, Mount Sinai, Dignity Health, UCSF, and more!

Major healthcare investors, including Providence Ventures, Merck Ventures, GE Ventures, and more!

Check out our full line up of speakers.

Limited amount of tickets are available. Register Today to secure your place at the Fall Conference-event starts this Sunday.

How health IT organizations are using security as a competitive advantage

When speaking with our health IT clients, I’m hearing a distinct shift when it comes to cybersecurity. They no longer view it as an IT cost; they understand how it can facilitate growth, create competitive advantage and build trust in their products and brand.

Their executive management is on board with this thinking, too. They don’t want to hear about fear, uncertainty and doubt when it comes to data breaches, hacks and cyber threats, but rather how cybersecurity can help ‘protect the house and the product’ while at the same time enabling the business, customers and partners.

As more products and services in the healthcare continuum are connected, the need to proactively address cybersecurity increases. And as more consumer and business information is generated and shared, data privacy becomes a critical business requirement. This explains why we’re seeing forward-thinking health IT organizations moving to a new model of cybersecurity – one that’s adaptive to evolving risks and threats plus aligns with overall business objectives, such as increased revenue.

The one unifying thing we see with most health IT clients is the cloud. They need to design, build, assess, test and validate architectures and products on the cloud to confidently go to market with secure solutions. They’re finding that as they address cybersecurity in the design and development of products and services, they experience new ways to innovate and move faster. These cloud-integrated solutions can also enhance data privacy and boost customer trust and brand reputation. These are crucial safeguards as consumers are more concerned than ever about how their data is collected and shared.

Organizations aren’t waiting to hear that security program elements to demonstrate customer data protection are a requirement to closing a deal, they’re getting proactive by using cybersecurity as a sales strategy.Continue reading…

Microsoft Set To Demo VR/Mixed reality Physician Education Platform

Dr. Simon Kos had big shoes to fill when he took over the role of Microsoft Chief Medical Officer from Dr. Bill Crounse last year. Dr. Kos said himself that they were some “big scrubs to fill”. However, at the time he had already been with Microsoft for six years and in Health IT for more than a decade before that, so he was no doubt up to the challenge.

As Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Kos is responsible for providing clinical guidance, worldwide thought leadership, vision and strategy for Microsoft technologies and solutions in the healthcare industries. He made the move to Health IT after working a few years as a Medical Officer in Sydney, Australia. It was then that Kos decided to go back to school to study software engineering, and later his MBA. He then worked with  InterSystems and Cerner and helped them to implement e-Health initiatives in Australia. In 2010 he joined Microsoft as a Health Industry Manager “with the appreciation that improving health and healthcare was about more than just putting in EMRs.”  Even back then Dr. Kos had the vision to know that the future of healthcare would be in the data analytics and the AI applications that Microsoft would eventually release.

In a recent conversation, with the team here at Health 2.0, Dr. Kos talked about Microsoft’s current framework of digital transformation and highlighted their four pillars; Patient Engagement, Clinician Empowerment, Advanced Analytics, and New Models of Care. As a once practicing doc, he knows that technology needs to help not hinder the healthcare workforce and that AI will be able to improve diagnosis speed and accuracy without replacing or interfering with the clinician. He is a fervent believer that it is important to be constantly evaluating the tech models that may not be viable today but will be in the future. He is excited about Microsoft’s work on patient chatbots and VR/Mixed reality physician education platforms and will be demoing that technology on the Health 2.0 Stage on Monday, October 2nd.

Register today! 

Interview with Paul Black, CEO, Allscripts

Paul Black is CEO of Allscripts and he’ll be with me at Health 2.0 on October 1-4. Paul has been CEO of Allscripts for about five years, taking over from Glen Tullman who grew the company aggressively by acquisition over the previous decade. Paul has been steering Allscripts through a pretty big transformation for the past few years, and they’ve been the major EMR vendor that has most aggressively reached out to the startup tech community. This is an edited transcript of an interview we had in late August. — Matthew Holt

Matthew Holt: Paul thanks for talking with me today, but also we’re going to have you on for a quick chat when you’ll be on the main stage at Health 2.0, of which Allscripts has been a great supporter. Your colleagues Tina Joros and Erik Kins have been there for many years  but not you, so I ‘m thrilled to have you coming in early October. Paul, welcome!

Paul Black: Thank you very much. It’s a pleasure to be on the call with you today.

Matthew: Let’s dive in to the current state of play. There’s been some changes over the last five to seven years since the HITECH dollars came in, as more and more physicians, and more and more hospitals put in electronic medical records.

Obviously, Allscripts, was, I think, it’s right to say, built by Glen and Lee Shapiro via  lot of acquisitions, especially with the Eclipsys purchase, with the goal of becoming a big player in that meaningful use world. And obviously, you have your old company, Cerner, and your friends from Wisconsin, Epic, who have been very dominant becoming a single platform for many large integrated delivery systems.  Can you give me your sense of where the mainstream enterprise EMR market is at the moment?

Paul: I think that the mainstream EMR market in United States is becoming a mature market. And by that I mean it’s a marketplace in which almost every institution, almost every hospital, almost every post-acute facility, almost every ambulatory facility, has some semblance of an electronic medical record system. And certainly, they have an electronic billing set of capabilities. So, from that standpoint, almost everybody has something with regard to the ordering the management of and the documentation surrounding a clinical series of events.

Matthew: Give me a sense of how you think that’s changing in terms of the split between the integrated systems which are covering in-patients and out-patients, with physicians using the same system on both sides of the fences were, and the continued, I would say growth, but probably more accurately the continued existence of a large ambulatory-only segment of the market? After all that’s different for not only the way that the health systems and medical groups organize, but also the way that they’re served by organizations like you and Epic and many others. Is that system integration continuing or do you think that trend is kind of stopping?

Paul: I’ll take it from a couple of different angles. One is from an integration at the industry level, what has been vertical integration of large integrated delivery networks, or large multispecialty groups, especially practices, or in some cases, payers who are acquiring assets.  I tend to see that while there was a lot going on over the course of the last four, five years, I’m starting to see people be more focused on what they’ve already acquired, and looking at operational efficiency and looking internally to ensure that they’re gleaning the expected returns, both clinically and financially,  of the original goals of how they built those enterprises. That means from a culture standpoint, from an operation standpoint, and from a financial standpoint.

So, I don’t sense that there is as much of a, if you will, a go-go attitude to the continuation of acquisitions.  I don’t think it’s necessarily been a conscious pause, but in some cases there’s been a lot of affiliations and acquisitions that have caused people to really have to  make sure that they’ve done the things they need to do to really operationalize and to optimize the assets and the people that they are now a part of a new overall enterprise. I think from an industry standpoint of the people that serve that marketplace, us and some of the companies that you mentioned today, I see it’s just a natural progression of the other point that you’ve started with about where do we find ourselves in the state of the industry.Continue reading…

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