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Category: Health 2.0

How health IT organizations are using security as a competitive advantage

When speaking with our health IT clients, I’m hearing a distinct shift when it comes to cybersecurity. They no longer view it as an IT cost; they understand how it can facilitate growth, create competitive advantage and build trust in their products and brand.

Their executive management is on board with this thinking, too. They don’t want to hear about fear, uncertainty and doubt when it comes to data breaches, hacks and cyber threats, but rather how cybersecurity can help ‘protect the house and the product’ while at the same time enabling the business, customers and partners.

As more products and services in the healthcare continuum are connected, the need to proactively address cybersecurity increases. And as more consumer and business information is generated and shared, data privacy becomes a critical business requirement. This explains why we’re seeing forward-thinking health IT organizations moving to a new model of cybersecurity – one that’s adaptive to evolving risks and threats plus aligns with overall business objectives, such as increased revenue.

The one unifying thing we see with most health IT clients is the cloud. They need to design, build, assess, test and validate architectures and products on the cloud to confidently go to market with secure solutions. They’re finding that as they address cybersecurity in the design and development of products and services, they experience new ways to innovate and move faster. These cloud-integrated solutions can also enhance data privacy and boost customer trust and brand reputation. These are crucial safeguards as consumers are more concerned than ever about how their data is collected and shared.

Organizations aren’t waiting to hear that security program elements to demonstrate customer data protection are a requirement to closing a deal, they’re getting proactive by using cybersecurity as a sales strategy.Continue reading…

Microsoft Set To Demo VR/Mixed reality Physician Education Platform

Dr. Simon Kos had big shoes to fill when he took over the role of Microsoft Chief Medical Officer from Dr. Bill Crounse last year. Dr. Kos said himself that they were some “big scrubs to fill”. However, at the time he had already been with Microsoft for six years and in Health IT for more than a decade before that, so he was no doubt up to the challenge.

As Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Kos is responsible for providing clinical guidance, worldwide thought leadership, vision and strategy for Microsoft technologies and solutions in the healthcare industries. He made the move to Health IT after working a few years as a Medical Officer in Sydney, Australia. It was then that Kos decided to go back to school to study software engineering, and later his MBA. He then worked with  InterSystems and Cerner and helped them to implement e-Health initiatives in Australia. In 2010 he joined Microsoft as a Health Industry Manager “with the appreciation that improving health and healthcare was about more than just putting in EMRs.”  Even back then Dr. Kos had the vision to know that the future of healthcare would be in the data analytics and the AI applications that Microsoft would eventually release.

In a recent conversation, with the team here at Health 2.0, Dr. Kos talked about Microsoft’s current framework of digital transformation and highlighted their four pillars; Patient Engagement, Clinician Empowerment, Advanced Analytics, and New Models of Care. As a once practicing doc, he knows that technology needs to help not hinder the healthcare workforce and that AI will be able to improve diagnosis speed and accuracy without replacing or interfering with the clinician. He is a fervent believer that it is important to be constantly evaluating the tech models that may not be viable today but will be in the future. He is excited about Microsoft’s work on patient chatbots and VR/Mixed reality physician education platforms and will be demoing that technology on the Health 2.0 Stage on Monday, October 2nd.

Register today! 

Interview with Paul Black, CEO, Allscripts

Paul Black is CEO of Allscripts and he’ll be with me at Health 2.0 on October 1-4. Paul has been CEO of Allscripts for about five years, taking over from Glen Tullman who grew the company aggressively by acquisition over the previous decade. Paul has been steering Allscripts through a pretty big transformation for the past few years, and they’ve been the major EMR vendor that has most aggressively reached out to the startup tech community. This is an edited transcript of an interview we had in late August. — Matthew Holt

Matthew Holt: Paul thanks for talking with me today, but also we’re going to have you on for a quick chat when you’ll be on the main stage at Health 2.0, of which Allscripts has been a great supporter. Your colleagues Tina Joros and Erik Kins have been there for many years  but not you, so I ‘m thrilled to have you coming in early October. Paul, welcome!

Paul Black: Thank you very much. It’s a pleasure to be on the call with you today.

Matthew: Let’s dive in to the current state of play. There’s been some changes over the last five to seven years since the HITECH dollars came in, as more and more physicians, and more and more hospitals put in electronic medical records.

Obviously, Allscripts, was, I think, it’s right to say, built by Glen and Lee Shapiro via  lot of acquisitions, especially with the Eclipsys purchase, with the goal of becoming a big player in that meaningful use world. And obviously, you have your old company, Cerner, and your friends from Wisconsin, Epic, who have been very dominant becoming a single platform for many large integrated delivery systems.  Can you give me your sense of where the mainstream enterprise EMR market is at the moment?

Paul: I think that the mainstream EMR market in United States is becoming a mature market. And by that I mean it’s a marketplace in which almost every institution, almost every hospital, almost every post-acute facility, almost every ambulatory facility, has some semblance of an electronic medical record system. And certainly, they have an electronic billing set of capabilities. So, from that standpoint, almost everybody has something with regard to the ordering the management of and the documentation surrounding a clinical series of events.

Matthew: Give me a sense of how you think that’s changing in terms of the split between the integrated systems which are covering in-patients and out-patients, with physicians using the same system on both sides of the fences were, and the continued, I would say growth, but probably more accurately the continued existence of a large ambulatory-only segment of the market? After all that’s different for not only the way that the health systems and medical groups organize, but also the way that they’re served by organizations like you and Epic and many others. Is that system integration continuing or do you think that trend is kind of stopping?

Paul: I’ll take it from a couple of different angles. One is from an integration at the industry level, what has been vertical integration of large integrated delivery networks, or large multispecialty groups, especially practices, or in some cases, payers who are acquiring assets.  I tend to see that while there was a lot going on over the course of the last four, five years, I’m starting to see people be more focused on what they’ve already acquired, and looking at operational efficiency and looking internally to ensure that they’re gleaning the expected returns, both clinically and financially,  of the original goals of how they built those enterprises. That means from a culture standpoint, from an operation standpoint, and from a financial standpoint.

So, I don’t sense that there is as much of a, if you will, a go-go attitude to the continuation of acquisitions.  I don’t think it’s necessarily been a conscious pause, but in some cases there’s been a lot of affiliations and acquisitions that have caused people to really have to  make sure that they’ve done the things they need to do to really operationalize and to optimize the assets and the people that they are now a part of a new overall enterprise. I think from an industry standpoint of the people that serve that marketplace, us and some of the companies that you mentioned today, I see it’s just a natural progression of the other point that you’ve started with about where do we find ourselves in the state of the industry.Continue reading…

Giving a Voice To Healthcare’s ‘Unacceptables’

Humans are aspirational by nature.

We dream big and invest tools that help us dream bigger. But we forget—sometimes willfully—that many of us are being left behind—because of racial, cultural or gender biases; poor access to connected technologies; or social stigmas associated with loneliness and sexual assault.

But if working in healthcare over the past 10 years have demonstrated anything, it’s that we are ready and willing to do something about the problems that keep all of us from looking to brighter futures.

It’s why I am proud to introduce a special session at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Technology Conference—The Unacceptables. Healthcare has too many innovators, too many dreamers, to empathizers to tolerate forgotten populations.

Leveling the Playing Field

As our society grows increasingly diverse and gaps in health among different populations increase, there is an urgency to develop solutions for underserved communities and diversify the population of innovators who are creating these solutions.

Diversity in Healthcare. As part of its mission to improve health for all, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has placed special emphasis on creating diversity in healthcare leadership. Last year, RWJF launched four new leadership development programs to engage people working across a variety of sectors to build a Culture of Health. Hear Michael Painter, Senior Program Officer, discuss how RWJF engages professionals, community advocates and organizers, doctoral scholars, clinicians, and researchers across multiple fields, represented by participants with diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and specialties.

Women in Health IT. The numbers are startling. Women make up 80% of the workforce, but only 4% of CEOs. Women in health IT earn 20% less than their male counterparts, according to HIMSS. Progress has been made, but more could be done (hello, booth ‘girls’, for a start) to address gender roles in our industry. Lisa Suennen, Senior Managing Director Healthcare Investing, GE Ventures, lead Venture Valkyrie LLC, a publishing, and business advisory firm and is a founder of CSweetener, a not-for-profit company focused on matching women in and nearing the healthcare C-Suite with mentors who have been there and wish to give back, and which she writes about here.

Read my full article here

Diversity in Health Tech: A Non-Negotiable

Last Fall, at Health 2.0’s annual conference, Health 2.0, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, hosted a panel focusing on minority entrepreneurs and building tech products for underrepresented groups. The discussion that followed the panel was a passionate and thought provoking conversation. Some feedback included questions like: “Why isn’t this discussed more often?” and “there is dire need for inclusive products and support of underrepresented groups in tech.” With that feedback Health 2.0 decided to do something about diversity in health tech.
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Which of These 10 New Companies Will Change the Face of Health care?

The Health 2.0 Fall Conference is the perfect place for new and young companies to get a foot in the door – to generate industry buzz, obtain critical funding and pitch new partners.

Our lineup includes:

Our exclusive Launch! event – 10 companies will debut their solutions and have them voted on by the audience.

Henk Jan Scholten, a co-founder of last year’s winner – Siren Care – said, “Launch! was the ideal platform for our product because it’s not only laser-focused on digital health but also has a stellar industry reputation and strong following of innovators and thought leaders. Showcasing our product with a live patient demo on stage gave us instant credibility that is hard to achieve.”

Be sure to also attend Traction, which puts Series A-ready companies center stage as they compete to be recognized as the most fundable start-up from venture capitalists and corporate investors.

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BREAKING NEWS: CTO of HHS, Headspace, Google join Health 2.0 – rate goes up tomorrow!

What do most healthcare shows have in common? The same old, same old. You spend the equivalent of a mortgage payment for the same thought leaders who tell you about the problems in healthcare and the same vendors with products that don’t quite get at the core.

We do things differently at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference. We’ve deliberately curated a wide-ranging, hands-on, attendee-driven experience that focuses on achieving the possible. Check it out:

1. Test-Drive the Tech: Obviously! The agenda and exhibit hall is packed with 150+ tech demos in dozens of product categories. No power points and empty promises. These are products in action and entrepreneurs with real life tales from the trenches.

Check out the latest from such companies as Headspace, Google Play, Welltok, and Microsoft. Want to see what’s really brand new? Check out Launch!

2. Turn point solutions into system change: We go beyond one-off apps to show you how to integrate innovation sustainably. With presentations on FHIR and blockchain; Interoperability; and with live input from providers like Sutter Health, UCSF, Mount Sinai Health System, and more….you will see how to implement change in real life.
3. Get currency and customers. Discover “Series A” finalists at Traction, and meet investors from New Enterprise Associates, Merck Ventures, Humana Health Ventures, Nexus Venture Partners, Kaiser Permanente Ventures, Summation Health Ventures, and more at the Investor Breakfast. Get customers atMarketConnect Live with buyers from Cigna, Sutter Health, Kaiser Permanente, Dignity Health, Stanford Health Care, Providence, and more.
4. Get under the hood. Health 2.0’s Dev Day will be showcasing the latest developer platform updates, and chatting about exciting plans on the horizon for companies working on FHIR, blockchain, machine learning, and predictive analytics. Innovators on hand will include Aashima Gupta, Global Head of Healthcare Solutions at Google Cloud; Adam Culbertson, Innovator-In- Residence at HIMSS; Andrew Shults, Senior Director of Engineering at Oscar, and data guru Fred Trotter.
5. Understand policy to see the opportunity. Policy impacts innovation. Discover how legislation and regulation will impact solutions development and implementation from Bruce Greenstein, CTO of HHS; Don Rucker, National Coordinator at ONC; former ONC Director David Brailer, and former U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra.

Register today before rates increase by $200 after tomorrow! 

Developers, Data Scientists, Coders – Don’t Miss Out on Dev Day @ Health 2.0!

Bright ideas are nothing without those who enable action.  For every bright idea in the digital health space, developers are needed to turn that idea into a reality.  We’ll be kicking of this year’s Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference  on October 1st (1-5pm) with Dev Day, a day dedicated to the developers, data scientists, and coders in the health tech space.

Expect your day to be filled with strong technical sessions in relation to interoperability and user testing, as well as opportunities to meet and learn from others in the industry.  We’ll be showcasing the latest developer product and platform updates and chatting about exciting plans on the horizon for innovators working on blockchain, artificial intelligence, and FHIR.
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Tackle The Next Wave Of Healthcare Consumerism

Value-based healthcare initiatives are great, but on their own won’t be enough to bend the healthcare cost curve.

The focus must move—and move quickly—from treating people who are sick to helping them get and stay healthy. The only way that’s going to happen is by getting patients and populations motivated to do the right things early instead of desperate things late.

The New Consumer World of Tools and Health Models
Health plans, in particular, have shifted responsibility onto consumers.

Kyle Rolfing, President and Co-Founder of Bright Health, and Jackie Auba, Vice President of Cigna’s Customer Adoption and Personalization Strategy, will share this shift during the The New Consumer World of Tools and Health Models panel at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference.

At this session you’ll also check out a demo from health optimization platform Welltok. Through population health management we are learning more about how to create wellness strategies and to stratify patient populations based on their conditions and adjust for nuances in age, race, diagnostic groups, and the like.

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The Best Part Of The Health 2.0 Fall Conference Agenda

There’s still time to secure your ticket before prices increase to this year’s Health 2.0 11th Annual Fall Conference. Whether you’re a Health Provider, Entrepreneur or Investor; the Fall Conference is the place to see the latest health technology, to hear from some of the influential innovators impacting the landscape, and to network with hundreds of health care decision makers. Click here for the full agenda.

Health Providers Agenda Highlights 
Entrepreneurs Agenda Highlights 
  • MarketConnect: A live matchmaking event designed to accelerate the health tech buying and selling process by curating meetings between pre-qualified healthcare executives and innovators.
  • Exhibit Hall: Gain access to 90+ exhibitors, including Startup Alley, is the premier gathering of innovative companies and individuals. The exhibit floor is also home to MarketConnect Live.
  • Developer Day: Expect your day to be filled with strong technical sessions in relation to interoperability and user testing as well as opportunities to network from others in the industry.
  • 2 CEOs and a President Session: Three top health tech executives sit down for separate intimate interviews with a journalist. They will be dishing on both their personal and company journeys.
Investors Agenda Highlights 
  • Investor Breakfast: Bringing together leaders in the Health 2.0 investment community and our innovative startup network for an exclusive breakfast meeting.
  • Investing in Health 2.0 Technologies: Panel experts will address what’s in store for the rest of the year and predict the next big bets in Silicon Valley and beyond.
  • Launch!: Ten brand new companies unveil their products for the very first time and the audience votes on the winner!
  • Traction!: Annual startup pitch competition that recruits companies ready for Series A in the $2-12M range. Teams will compete in two tracks, consumer-facing, and professional facing technologies.

Click here to register for the Annual Fall Conference! Prices increase after September 4th!

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