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Interview with Rasu Shrestha, CIO at UPMC

More about Health 2.0 Rasu Shrestha, CIO at the University of Pittsburg Medical Center, will be joining me on stage this afternoon in our Provider Symposium (on his birthday) and again on Tuesday, September 27th for our Information Blocking, APIs & App Stores: The State of Play in Data Access session. Below is the interview I had with him a couple of weeks ago about how a huge medical center like UPMC deals with the innovation side of the house. Not too late to sign up and come to Health 2.0 and come hear what else Rasu has to say!

A chat with Ian Morrison

My old friend and former boss Ian Morrison will be giving the keynote at Health 2.0’s 10th Annual Fall Conference on the afternoon of Tuesday, September 27thIan was President of Institute for the Future in the 1990s, founded the Strategic Health Perspectives service, and is in more health care board rooms and conference halls than almost anyone. At Health 2.0, Ian will share his latest insights into the future of health care. Did we tell you he’s the pre-eminent jokester on the health care speaking circuit? Well he is! You can still Register and come hear what else Ian has to say! But here’s a taster — Matthew Holt

The Nordics at Health 2.0

By now you all know that the 10th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference is next week. What you may not know is that it’s a great place to meet delegates from across the world. In particular both tech companies and providers & government officials from from Scandinavia will be there next week. Below are Ase Bailey (TINC in Silicon Valley/Innovation Norway) & Anne Lidgard (VINNOVA/Innovation Sweden) talking about the Nordic group’s visit to Health 2.0. By the way, for those in the Bay Area, there’s a reception with the Nordic delegation at the Nordic House in Palo Alto on Thursday nightMatthew Holt

Accessing & Using APIs from Major EMR Vendors–Some Data at Last!

Today I’m happy to release some really unique data about a pressing problem–the ability of small tech vendors to access health data contained in the systems of the major EMR vendors. There’ll be much more discussion of this topic at the Health 2.0 Provider Symposium on Sunday, and much more in the Health 2.0 Fall Annual Conference as a whole.

Information blocking, Siloed data. No real inter-operability. Standards that aren’t standards. In the last few years, the clamor about the problems accessing personal health data has grown as the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) increased post the Federally-funded HITECH program. But at Health 2.0 where we focus on newer health tech startups using SMAC (Social/Sensor; Mobile OS; Cloud; Analytics) technologies, the common complaint we’ve heard has been that the legacy–usually client-server based–EMR vendors won’t let the newer vendors integrate with them.

With support from California Health Care Foundation, earlier this year (2016) Health 2.0 surveyed over 100 small health tech companies to ask their experiences integrating with specific EMR vendors.

The key message: The complaint is true: it’s hard for smaller health tech companies to integrate their solutions with big EMR vendors. Most EMR vendors don’t make it easy. But it’s a false picture to say that it’s all the EMR vendors’ fault, and it’s also true that there is great variety not only between the major EMR vendors but also in the experience of different smaller tech companies dealing with the same EMR vendor. All the data is in the embedded slide set below, with much more commentary below the fold.

Improving Diversity in Health Technology

Diversity in Health Technology

I am thrilled that Health 2.0 is today announcing a new program aimed at improving diversity in the field of health technology. This will run all year (and hopefully beyond) and will start at the Health 2.0 10th Annual Fall Conference on Sept 25-8, where we will host a group drawn from populations that are underrepresented in the health technology field. There’ll also be a dedicated session on the topic on Sept 26 at 12.15pm that has been generously supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Matthew Holt

The Problem: There is a lack of diversity among health technology innovators and a shortage of technologies that meet the needs of minority audiences. Technology is a powerful tool that can help improve health outcomes and alleviate problems within our current health system. As our society grows increasingly diverse and gaps in health among different populations increase, there is an urgency to develop solutions for underserved communities and diversify the population of innovators who are creating these solutions.   

The Conference Support Program: The Diversity in Health Technology Conference Support Program, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, encourages individuals interested in diversifying the health technology field and who are interested in, or currently engaged with, health technology, to attend Health 2.0’s 10th Annual Fall Conference (Sept 25-8). Individuals from populations that are underrepresented in the health technology field are particular encouraged to apply. The conference support will include complimentary access to the annual conference. Conference support recipients will be required to attend the “Diversity in Health Technology” workshop. The workshop will serve as the formal kickoff to a year-long campaign focused on engaging more diverse voices in health technology. Conference support recipients must also attend and participate in two webinars hosted by Health 2.0 to further review the diversity in technology issue, submit a post-conference summary to Health 2.0 of the individual’s conference experience that Health 2.0 may use for a white paper on the diversity issue and a summary about specific activities the individual plans to do over the next year to address diversity in technology.

For more information and to apply to join the program, visit the Diversity in Health Technology site.

 

The Levers We Have at Our Disposal to Reduce Spending on High Cost Claimants

CindySweb

A new report out from the American Health Policy Institute and Leavitt Partners further quantifies what we already know: a handful of employees are responsible for the bulk of employers’ health care spending. The new report documented that among 26 large employers, 1.2 percent of employees are high cost claimants who comprise 31 percent of total health care spending. Interestingly enough, the report was released on the heels of news yet again that high deductible health plans continue to be more popular than ever as a strategy for employers to control costs, with employee cost sharing expected to rise yet again this year.

And yet high deductible health plans may do more to bend the cost trend for healthy employees by reducing spending on items like pharmaceuticals and lab testing but not on inpatient care.

The least heathy employees quickly blow through their deductible, and their health issues are so acute and their bills so large, they don’t shop around for care. So what is a large employer or any purchaser concerned about these high cost claimants to do?

Consumerism in how we typically think of the concept doesn’t seem to be working.  For example, according to McKinsey,most healthcare consumers are not doing their homework – they aren’t researching costs or their choice of providers. And even for the handful that do use price transparency tools, new research shows this doesn’t result in savings. It’s not that patients with serious health conditions don’t want to understand their condition, the latest evidence-based treatment options, who are the best physicians, and treatment costs. It’s just that they need assistance curating and interpreting this complex information.Continue reading…

Launch! at Health 2.0

Launch

Launch! is always one of the most fun and most exciting sessions at Health 2.0. Ten new companies demo their product on stage for the very first time during at the 10th Annual Fall Conference. Previous Launch! winners have included Castlight Health, Basis, and OM*Signal and last year’s winner MedWand, which just beat out Gliimpse–itself since bought by Apple.

This year’s finalists are:
  • Valeet Healthcares platform gives patients personalized health information while allowing providers to have a rounding tool and giving healthcare systems a dashboard to track metrics.
  • gripAble is an innovative mobile technology that bridges the gap between functional therapy and objective measurement of upper-limb function.
  • Cricket Health works with payor and provider customers to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), manage the transition from CKD to End Stage Renal Disease, and improve ESRD care.
  • Qidza is a population health mobile platform that enables parents work with their physicians to track their children’s developmental milestones
  • Docent Health guides health systems to embrace a consumer-centric approach to healthcare by curating patient experiences.
  • Albeado builds Healthcare prediction and optimization solutions based on proprietary data science platform which combines clinical AI and Graph-Based Machine Learning.
  • Siren Care offers temperature-sensing smart socks which provide health data on foot ulcers, hot spots, and more to prevent future injuries.
  • MDwithME integrates soft and hardware components in a suitcase enabling full remote physical exams with an option of instant or delayed physician’s consult with quality of testing that equals or exceeds the current state of art.
  • DayTwo maintains health and prevent disease utilizing a microbiome platform, starting with personalized nutrition based on gut bacteria, aiming to normalize blood sugar levels and cultivate a healthy gut microbiome.
  • Regeneration Health is a health ecosystem powered by artificial intelligence that collects and monitors health in real time and curates free personalized health info and recommendations based on integrative medicine.

You can see them on Wednesday, the last day of the Health 2.0 10th Annual Fall Conference Sept 25-8 in Santa Clara, CA.

Jess Jacobs, POTS & her bio

10yrGlobaRetroBIG

As part of Health 2.0’s 10 Year Global Retrospective Awards (yes, winners to be celebrated at Health 2.0’s 10th Annual Fall Conference September 25-8), I wrote a bunch of bios. One patient and friend of mine Jess Jacobs has (as many of you know) recently died. Fellow POTS patient Greg Norman didn’t much care for the brief bio I wrote about Jess. So below the fold please read his tweet storm about it! And of course please comment.
Continue reading…

The Health 2.0 10 Year Global Retrospective Awards

10yrGlobaRetroBIG

Yup, more blowing the trumpet about Health 2.0! We’re celebrating our 10th conference in 2 weeks and over the summer we’ve been looking back at the people and organizations who’ve made a mark in health tech, digital health, Health 2.0, or whatever you want to call it. For ten years Health 2.0 has showcased and connected with thousands of technologies, companies, innovative thought leaders, and patient activists through our many events and conferences, challenges, code-a-thons, market research, blog posts, pilot programs and general industry promotion. Since our first conference in 2007, Health 2.0 has grown into a global movement and community of over 100,000 entrepreneurs, developers, and health care stakeholders, and 110+ chapters on six continents

As we prepare to usher in the 10th year of Health 2.0, we want to take this opportunity to reflect on and recognize the accomplishments of this powerful community and movement. To do this, we asked our community to nominate the top influencers from the world of Health 2.0. Over the summer thousands of people voted and now the finalists are showcased on Health 2.0’s 10 Year Global Retrospective Awards for all to see. It’s time to vote for the finalists, and the winners will be celebrated at Health 2.0’s 10th Annual Fall Conference on September 25-8 in Santa Clara, California.

Please go take a look at the finalists and vote for your favorites!

Health 2.0–Expediting The Health Technology Buying Process

Like I told you, there’ll be a lot more on THCB about what’s going to be happening at Health 2.0 coming up Sept 25-8. Today’s edition–MarketConnect a new program for getting new products into provider organizations, modeled on something we’ve been doing as part of our pilot programs in Health 2.0’s Catalyst group–Matthew Holt

Through vigorous vetting of health technology companies and matching based on prospective buyers’ needs, Health 2.0 is simplifying and expediting the health tech buying and selling process during the 10th Annual Fall Conference on September 25-28 in Santa Clara. Health 2.0’s MarketConnect is an invitation only forum for buyers and sellers to be pre-matched for market compatibility and facilitate technology acquisition. Executives from organizations such as Kaiser Permanente, Cedars-Sinai and UPMC will be looking to connect with technology companies.

The networking program is designed to break down the barriers of technology adoption within large health systems and health organizations to connect tech companies directly with pre-qualified executives that are interested in seeing vetted technologies that are relevant to problems that are trying to solve.

How it works: Health 2.0 works with closely with buyers to identify specific areas where technology is needed and a solution is required within 12 months. Health 2.0 then assess the digital health marketplace and identifies relevant companies aligned with buyer’s’ technology needs and connect buyers with hand-picked companies during our MarketConnect event at Health 2.0’s Annual Fall Conference. During the event, buyers will meet with compatible companies with the intent of purchasing suitable technologies. If you want to know more contact Patrick@health2con.com

 

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