Tech

Providers Are Held Accountable. Why Aren’t Technology Vendors?

As healthcare shifts from fee-for-service to fee-for-value, hospitals and physicians are increasingly being held accountable for outcomes by the government, payers and patients. Historically, provider organizations only had to meet performance criteria to earn a pay-for-performance bonuses or hospital certification, but with the arrival of Accountable Care Organizations (ACO), Meaningful Use and other programs, payment is now based on to quality of care rather than quantity of services.

Health information technology (HIT) systems are able to track physician actions and measure outcomes down to the individual patient level and allow organizations to closely monitor the quality levels of a given physician. These same tools should be able to monitor the performance of the vendors who are there to support these clinicians. With patient engagement solutions, for example, vendors claim they can help improve HCAHPS scores, treatment adherence, patient outcomes, and reduce costs, but have no evidence to back it up.

Vendors should be willing to commit to their patient engagement promises, present proof showing improved outcomes and face some financial risk for failing to deliver.

Global accountability

Since patient engagement was included in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Solutions’ Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records program, it has become a popular buzzword. Every HIT vendor claims to offer tools to assist providers with this important clinical quality issue, but no one is holding anyone accountable.


Part of the problem is patient engagement lacks a standard definition. The ambiguity allows publishers of diabetes fact sheets to call it patient engagement when a newly diagnosed patient is handed a 100-page binder of information that is more likely to become a doorstop than an interactive engagement tool. Likewise, call centers that remind patients of their appointments, in-room entertainment systems, or printed discharge instructions, could also erroneously be called “patient engagement.” The reality is handing someone a piece of paper is not engaging them in their care. When the industry talks about patient engagement, they mean motivating patients to take an active role in their care to drive outcomes. A piece of paper will not change their care. Calling someone may help them show up for an appointment, but is unlikely to change their behavior and better control their chronic condition. What specific outcomes are improved by these activities? Can it even be measured or shown to deliver a return on investment?

Delivering results, not promises

This is the era of buyer beware. Provider organizations should demand proof statements—not promises—from patient engagement vendors. If organizations want to make patient engagement a part of their care process, then their technology partner should support the needs of everyone who delivers and receives care across the continuum. Can you truly engage someone “across the continuum” from a hospital bed, when roughly 90 percent of patient encounters occur outside the hospital setting [1]?

Organizations need engagement partners with longevity that deliver case examples showing how their solutions have improved clinical quality and/or financial performance across all care settings. These vendors also need to be able to support their claims with assurances that if they fail to meet expectations, the provider organization won’t be at financial risk.

For a patient engagement initiative, organizations need a comprehensive enterprise-wide solution that imparts actionable information to patients and then measures the impact. This doesn’t mean providers should just put information in front of patients, but rather present it in a way that they understand and will take action on it.

Comprehensive outcomes-driven engagement needs to track not only the delivery, but also the consumption of information, which then enables the measurement of impact – on individuals and populations of patients. True technology-driven patient engagement has already been proven effective in numerous provider organizations where data analyses have demonstrated it results in higher HCAHPS scores, reduced length of stay, fewer malpractice claims, the list goes on…

Technology cannot and should not replace physicians’ skills, experience and face-to-face interaction. However, technology can and should be held accountable as a partner. A provider organization would never hire a physician who refused to be held accountable for their performance, so why should they invest as much, if not more, on technology that won’t offer the same?

Jordan Dolin is the founder and vice chairman of Emmi Solutions, a pioneer of outcomes-driven patient engagement.

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Keith Rowley
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May I politely take issue with this, as an engineer? I have some thirty years of experience in product design. The responsibility of a system designer begins and ends with making a system (or product) that meets the specification that was input to the design process. Thus, in the case of systems used by medical practitioners, they need to be specified by those practitioners before they ever get near a design facility. If the systems work to specification and do not meet customers needs, the responsibility then lies with the people who specified the system in the first instance –… Read more »

John Gies
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John Gies

It is not just about the technology and or the forms that impact patient engagement. It is also the philosophy and culture. Are providers ready for engaged patients that show up with pages from the web with hypothetical diagnosis already? Are our systems ready for patients to engage the way “They” want to’ phone for mom and dad, text for the college student.

In addition to thinking about technology we also want to think about the soft stuff of patient engagement.

Dennis Swarup
Guest

I agree with Jordan that the efficacy of a healthcare technology platform that reports performance criteria lies in its ability to meet measurable goals. Federal programs like MU and PQRS probably serve as strong reference points to define such goals. Real evidence that the technology actually delivers on its promise is hard to come by, unless we are able to track metrics like increase in physician adoption, or reduction in reporting time. Our work with Holzer may be of interest http://bit.ly/1brenAh.

Dr Pullen
Guest

I agree with Al Lewis that using some relatively arbitrary “engagement” as a metric of quality health care is obscene. It is simply one more aspect of the system to game. Physicians are reasonably bright, and if you pay them to document some aspect of an encounter they will find a way to document that aspect. Instead pay for true outcomes, or at least some objective proxy for an outcome like BP, HbA1C, LDL, etc. Don’t pay for a simple documentation of an exchange of information.

Whatsen Williams
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Whatsen Williams

@shannon

Go ahead and blame the users. Gee, the administration was complaining that I did not use my pen and paper correctly!

Aquifer
Guest
Aquifer

During an interaction with one of many computer techs i have had to engage with recently, i suggested that if computer companies were subject to the same requirements of competency as medical folk – they would be perpetually defending themselves against “malfunction” suits …

Shannon | Ready Medical Staff
Guest

Another aspect is that no matter how “perfect” an IT system may be, it is up to the staff to implement those tools in a meaningful and consistent way.

Vik Khanna
Guest

This is an excellent post. It is not at all uncommon to hear health IT vendors claim all the time that their widget is the cure to what ails the system, but when pressed, it’s easy to see that they often have few or no metrics for success. Worse still, they don’t think that the accountability flow ought to extend to them. After all, they’re just tools in the process…the real levers for engagement are clinicians, and if they can’t get patients engaged, then that can’t possibly be the IT vendor’s fault. And, while we’re at it, let’s lasso wellness… Read more »

Jordan Dolin
Guest

My point exactly! We have spent over a decade learning how to truly “engage” patients in a way that prompts an action or changes a behavior. There are 2 things which i now know to be true, 1) when done correctly, patient engagement will improve clinical and financial outcomes. and 2) it’s really, really hard to engage patients. It requires a deep understanding of communication methodologies, health literacy levels, cultural sensitivities and individual learning styles. There are organizations who have done the work and made the investment. Their solutions will have been shaped by the market and they more than… Read more »

Sandra_Raup
Guest

Part of the problem, I think, is the term “engagement”. It sounds so one-sided and operational, rather than bringing patients/consumers into two-way relationships. Why would a patient be startled by an email about stage IV cancer? Or call after hours about an abnormal but not significant lab value? It’s because they have not been adequately prepared. I have heard more often from patients who have had sleepless nights waiting for a test result than concern they’ve gotten a test result too early. There are few test results that are incidental – usually, you’re looking for something and patients should be… Read more »

Al Lewis
Guest

I am shocked, shocked, that EHR vendors are not being held accountable. That never happens in disease management or wellness, where engagement is defined very strictly as: whatever the vendor wants it to mean.

And, yes, handing out pieces of paper and/or making phone calls that get answered in any way other than a machine count as engagement.

Measuring engagement itself is a fool’s errand. If patients are indeed being engaged, it should show up in things like readmissions, fill rates, ambulatory care-sensitive admissions etc. THAT’s what tells you whether someone is engaged.

Dr. Rick Lippin
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Dr. Rick Lippin

I agree with Ross Koppel

Dr. Rick Lippin
Southampton, Pa

bubbles
Guest
bubbles

EHR Vendors are not accountable by law. They have padded the coffers of Congress to influence the printing of laws that do not require them to have their systems validated for safety, efficacy, usability, or interoperability, or to report adverse events or crashes. Moreover, the ONC is mostly a cheerleader for HIT, and ignores the importance of interoperability, as witnessed by Mostashafi”s testimony (and his bow tie) to the Senate Finance Committee last week. Patient access to records is a joke and a nuisance, for which doctors are not getting paid. A physician friend of mine was called, interrupted from… Read more »

MedicalQuack
Guest

Data selling and the incentives add to the issues in healthcare. Check out the gamification to exploit it, you can buy a profile of a disgruntled nurse selling medical records, learn how to hack other data brokers data bases and collaborate with them and start all kinds of new web services, you will be a hero it says. Actually the video is very well done. We need to license and excise tax quarterly all data sellers, totally not regulated at all and you don;t know what goes on behind closed server doors when you get an insurer like United that… Read more »