Tech

Tech

The Best Positioned Tech Giant in Healthcare Today? The Answer May Surprise You.

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When you think about tech giants playing in healthcare, you think of Google and the work Verily is doing; you think of Apple and their HealthKit and ResearchKit applications, as well as their rumored plans to organize all your medical data on your iPhone; you may even think of Amazon and their potential entry into the pharmacy market.

But the name you may hear about least–Facebook–may actually be the company influencing healthcare the most, and may also be the best positioned to support the patient-centered future that so many imagine and that Eric Topol described in The Patient Will See You Now (my Wall Street Journal review here).

At first blush, Facebook seems to be doing remarkably little in health; their most notable effort has arguably been providing the opportunity to list your organ donor status, an initiative which produced an immediate lift in organ donor registrations.

BREAKING NEWS: CTO of HHS, Headspace, Google join Health 2.0 – rate goes up tomorrow!

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What do most healthcare shows have in common? The same old, same old. You spend the equivalent of a mortgage payment for the same thought leaders who tell you about the problems in healthcare and the same vendors with products that don’t quite get at the core.

We do things differently at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference. We’ve deliberately curated a wide-ranging, hands-on, attendee-driven experience that focuses on achieving the possible. Check it out:

1. Test-Drive the Tech: Obviously! The agenda and exhibit hall is packed with 150+ tech demos in dozens of product categories. No power points and empty promises. These are products in action and entrepreneurs with real life tales from the trenches.

Check out the latest from such companies as Headspace, Google Play, Welltok, and Microsoft. Want to see what’s really brand new? Check out Launch!

2. Turn point solutions into system change: We go beyond one-off apps to show you how to integrate innovation sustainably. With presentations on FHIR and blockchain; Interoperability; and with live input from providers like Sutter Health, UCSF, Mount Sinai Health System, and more….you will see how to implement change in real life.
3. Get currency and customers. Discover “Series A” finalists at Traction, and meet investors from New Enterprise Associates, Merck Ventures, Humana Health Ventures, Nexus Venture Partners, Kaiser Permanente Ventures, Summation Health Ventures, and more at the Investor Breakfast. Get customers atMarketConnect Live with buyers from Cigna, Sutter Health, Kaiser Permanente, Dignity Health, Stanford Health Care, Providence, and more.
4. Get under the hood. Health 2.0’s Dev Day will be showcasing the latest developer platform updates, and chatting about exciting plans on the horizon for companies working on FHIR, blockchain, machine learning, and predictive analytics. Innovators on hand will include Aashima Gupta, Global Head of Healthcare Solutions at Google Cloud; Adam Culbertson, Innovator-In- Residence at HIMSS; Andrew Shults, Senior Director of Engineering at Oscar, and data guru Fred Trotter.
5. Understand policy to see the opportunity. Policy impacts innovation. Discover how legislation and regulation will impact solutions development and implementation from Bruce Greenstein, CTO of HHS; Don Rucker, National Coordinator at ONC; former ONC Director David Brailer, and former U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra.

Register today before rates increase by $200 after tomorrow! 

Should We Fear an Amazon Monopoly on Healthy Food? 

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Two months ago, I wrote about the potential impact of the Amazon purchase of Whole Foods on grocery prices.  Both here and in the Boston Globe, I hoped and predicted that Amazon would use its famed distribution network to drive down prices on the healthy and organic foodstuffs that made Whole Foods famous.

I’m happy to say that I was right. Today, on Day 1 of Amazon’s official ownership of Whole Foods, Americans got to see the first tangible impacts of Amazon ownership and, as predicted, it was lower prices.  As noted by journalists, the chain once derided as Whole Paycheck should now be referred to as “3/4 Paycheck” given deep discounts averaging 25% on a wide range of products ranging from bananas to butter.

Though terrifying for Amazon’s competitors such as Kroger, Walmart and Costco, Amazon’s major foray into brick-and-mortar groceries may end up being a boon for consumers – at least in the short term.  It’s no secret that Amazon retains its web startup mentality in aggressively promoting loss leaders to drive out competition.  And increased competition will better serve consumers who have been squeezed by recovering inflation on food prices.

Soon, Amazon intends to install more of its Amazon lockers into Whole Foods locations, thereby facilitating deliveries for goods bought on the Amazon website while also increasing foot traffic to its stores.  Analysts also speculate that Amazon’s grocery delivery service, Amazon Fresh, may get a much-needed shot in the arm with goods from Whole Foods.  The corporate synergy of this deal is palpable – and just beginning.

This makes people nervous.  Already, journalists and think tanks have sounded alarms about how Amazon’s growing power may make it a monopoly.  They argue that Amazon is an antitrust problem given that it already captures nearly half of U.S. online sales, is the leader in providing cloud computing through Amazon Web Services and has a robust marketing and logistics division.

To bolster their point, it is true that Americans can now spend a large part of their day using Amazon services without even knowing it.  You could wake up on a Saturday, go to Whole Foods for groceries, order supplies off Amazon, read a book with your Kindle, watch TV on Netflix (powered by Amazon Web Services) or catch a movie on Amazon Prime Video.  All of your needs met by Jeff Bezos and company.

Think Different about Patient Engagement: Aetna, Apple, and a Vision of Digital Health’s Future, Part 2

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This is the second post in a series on digital health inspired by Aetna and Apple, whose developing partnership is poised to impact millions of Americans. Part 1 is Mystery Mission in LA.

Getting to Patient Engagement

“Patient engagement” is a popular phrase in healthcare these days, but how do you actually get people to take a greater role vis a vis their own health and healthcare? As the first Director of Consumer eHealth at ONC in the US federal government, I spent several years making the case for strengthening patient engagement with technology, and trying to figure out how to make it happen at scale. With Aetna and Apple working together, I think we’re a step closer.

Tackle The Next Wave Of Healthcare Consumerism

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Value-based healthcare initiatives are great, but on their own won’t be enough to bend the healthcare cost curve.

The focus must move—and move quickly—from treating people who are sick to helping them get and stay healthy. The only way that’s going to happen is by getting patients and populations motivated to do the right things early instead of desperate things late.

The New Consumer World of Tools and Health Models
Health plans, in particular, have shifted responsibility onto consumers.

Kyle Rolfing, President and Co-Founder of Bright Health, and Jackie Auba, Vice President of Cigna’s Customer Adoption and Personalization Strategy, will share this shift during the The New Consumer World of Tools and Health Models panel at the 11th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference.

At this session you’ll also check out a demo from health optimization platform Welltok. Through population health management we are learning more about how to create wellness strategies and to stratify patient populations based on their conditions and adjust for nuances in age, race, diagnostic groups, and the like.

A Mystery Mission in LA: Aetna, Apple, and a Vision of Digital Health’s Future, Part 1

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It was an invitation too intriguing to refuse: fly to LA to participate in a “top-secret mission” related to digital health. Instructions? Bring workout clothes. Don’t disclose your location. “We can’t say much. Just enough for you to quickly pack your bags, fly to California and participate in an exclusive Apple Watch from Aetna event – all expenses paid.” Generally, I’d file this type of message in the junk mail folder, but knowing that Apple takes secrecy seriously, I did some background sleuthing and decided it looked legit.

The mystery unfolded last week as I stepped into a black car at LAX with a secretive driver who joked that I and his other two passengers (who had received similar invites) would have to cover our faces as we drove through town. (Yikes!) When we arrived at a hip “concept” hotel I felt more at ease, and relaxed into enjoying the so-called mission with a glass of wine and some discussion of trends in the digital health industry. Over the course of a couple of days I was fortunate to join a group of new (and some old) friends to exchange ideas, take a challenging hike to the peak of Runyon Canyon Park, interact with Apple and Aetna execs, try out some new technologies, and get a glimpse of what both Aetna and Apple are envisioning for the future of digital health. I was assigned to one of several teams named after famous movies (in keeping with the Tinseltown theme) a personalized agenda, and some critical tools for the modern adventurer, including a bandana, water bottles, a phone charger, and, naturally, a selfie stick.

For about a year Aetna has used the Apple watch as part of an integrated wellness program available to its 50 thousand employees and those of several partner organizations it insures, such as Hartford HealthCare, which was represented among the participants in the mystery mission. Both companies are poised to expand the program.

The Best Part Of The Health 2.0 Fall Conference Agenda

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There’s still time to secure your ticket before prices increase to this year’s Health 2.0 11th Annual Fall Conference. Whether you’re a Health Provider, Entrepreneur or Investor; the Fall Conference is the place to see the latest health technology, to hear from some of the influential innovators impacting the landscape, and to network with hundreds of health care decision makers. Click here for the full agenda.

Health Providers Agenda Highlights 
Entrepreneurs Agenda Highlights 
  • MarketConnect: A live matchmaking event designed to accelerate the health tech buying and selling process by curating meetings between pre-qualified healthcare executives and innovators.
  • Exhibit Hall: Gain access to 90+ exhibitors, including Startup Alley, is the premier gathering of innovative companies and individuals. The exhibit floor is also home to MarketConnect Live.
  • Developer Day: Expect your day to be filled with strong technical sessions in relation to interoperability and user testing as well as opportunities to network from others in the industry.
  • 2 CEOs and a President Session: Three top health tech executives sit down for separate intimate interviews with a journalist. They will be dishing on both their personal and company journeys.
Investors Agenda Highlights 
  • Investor Breakfast: Bringing together leaders in the Health 2.0 investment community and our innovative startup network for an exclusive breakfast meeting.
  • Investing in Health 2.0 Technologies: Panel experts will address what’s in store for the rest of the year and predict the next big bets in Silicon Valley and beyond.
  • Launch!: Ten brand new companies unveil their products for the very first time and the audience votes on the winner!
  • Traction!: Annual startup pitch competition that recruits companies ready for Series A in the $2-12M range. Teams will compete in two tracks, consumer-facing, and professional facing technologies.

Click here to register for the Annual Fall Conference! Prices increase after September 4th!

A New Pothole on the Health Interoperability Superhighway

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On July 24, the new administration kicked off their version of interoperability work with a public meeting of the incumbent trust brokers. They invited the usual suspects Carequality, CARIN Alliance, CommonWell, Digital Bridge, DirectTrust, eHealth Exchange, NATE, and SHIEC with the goal of driving for an understanding of how these groups will work with each other to solve information blocking and longitudinal health records as mandated by the 21st Century Cures Act.

Of the 8 would-be trust brokers, some go back to 2008 but only one is contemporary to the 21stCC act: The CARIN Alliance. The growing list of trust brokers over our decade of digital health tracks with the growing frustration of physicians, patients, and Congress over information blocking, but is there causation beyond just correlation?

A recent talk by ONC’s Don Rucker reports:

One way to get data to move is open APIs, which the 21st Century Cures Act mandates by tasking EHR vendors to open up patient data “without special effort, through the use of application programming interfaces.”

Dear Humans, Diverse Social Networks are the Answer

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In biology, it is clear that access to more genes leads to greater overall health. This is true because it allows for a greater likelihood that a genetic defect can be compensated by a gene from a different pool. This is the reason that inbreeding leads to more genetic diseases. This same phenomenon exists in social science. Complex social networks are healthier than more narrow (constrained) ones. Dr. Amar Dhand of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Department of Neurology has, for example, shown that people are more likely to get to the emergency room in time to receive a clot busting therapy for stroke if they are part of a more complex, rather than constrained, social network.

The probable reason for this effect is the diversity of ideas that are available in the complex social networks is greater than in the narrow ones. Despite these advantages, human beings tend to resist diversity, depending instead on a competing drive to create cliques and clubs.   In Arlie Russell Hochschild’s book, Strangers in Their Own Land, she attempts to understand what she sees as a paradox.   Why do people vote in manners that seem to be contrary to their own self interest? In fact this is not a paradox, but rather simply a competition between two deeply ingrained human traits; one biological and the other sociological.

The phenomenon of professional burnout is a case in point. It is generally defined as a sense of cynicism, depersonalization and ineffectiveness. Some believe that we are in the midst of an epidemic of burnout, affecting as many as half of medical doctors, for example. The causes of burnout are protean, but at the core of the problem is the perception of unfairness; that one is the subject of a form of bias or prejudice whereby certain resources are unfairly distributed by a powerful force, such as the employer or the government. Any individual or group may be subject to this perception. Much of the conflict that is being expressed around the world can be understood as an analogue to professional burnout, in other words, caused at its root by a perception of unfairness. So what is perception and from where does it arise?

Why Smart Pill Bottles and Financial Rewards Don’t Improve Medication Adherence

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A study published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine showed financial rewards and connected pill bottles don’t work. One explanation suggests that “other patient concerns about potential adverse effects of these medications, such as impotence or fatigue, were not targeted by this engagement strategy.”

What?!!!!!??

How can a patient engagement strategy not target the patient’s concerns? Isn’t that the very definition of patient engagement? Impotence and fatigue are a big deal to most people. Would an extra $15 a week compel you to take a medication that made you impotent? $150 a week? Would a pulsating pill bottle in your cabinet get you to swallow a pill that made you feel foggy and tired all day?

We can’t incent or remind someone to do something they never agreed to or intended to do. It would be like Amazon pinging you to buy something you would never consider adding to your cart. Amazon nudges you to buy things that you would put in your cart or things you saved to your cart, but never purchased. Why aren’t we as laser-focused on what matters to patients?