Friday, July 20, 2018

Physicians

Physicians
The doctor is in ...

The Evolution of Precision Health

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Health 2.0 sat down with Linda Molnar to discuss the evolution of Precision Health, the imperatives at stake in a fast-paced field, and empowerment through big data. Linda has over 20 years in the field of Life Sciences and is responsible for a number of initiatives that further the field with start-ups, the feds, and for investors.

Her current endeavor is leading the upcoming Technology for Precision Health Summit in San Francisco alongside Health 2.0. “We’re never going to pull together all of this disparate data from disparate sources in a meaningful (i.e. clinically actionable) way, unless we talk about it” she says. “The Summit is an attempt to bring together the worlds of Precision Medicine and Digital Healthcare to realize the full potential of a predictive and proactive approach to maintaining health”.

Check out the full interview here.
As a bonus, save 25% off the standard admission to the Technology for Precision Health Summit by using discount code TPH25Register here!

Health Care Needs Its Rosa Parks Moment

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On Wednesday, October 25, 2017 I was at the inaugural Society for Participatory Medicine conference. It was a fantastic day and the ending keynote was the superb Shannon Brownlee. It was great to catch up with her and I’m grateful that she agreed to let THCB publish her speech. Settle back with a cup of coffee (or as it’s Thanksgiving, perhaps something stronger), and enjoy–Matthew Holt

George Burns once said, the secret to a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending—and to have the two as close together as possible. I think the same is true of final keynotes after a fantastic conference. So I will do my best to begin and end well, and keep the middle to a minimum.

I have two main goals today. First, I want to praise the work you are doing, and set it into a wider context of the radical transformation of health care that has to happen if we want to achieve a system that is accountable to patients and communities, affordable, effective — and universal: everybody in, nobody out.

My second goal is to recruit you. I’m the co-founder of the Right Care Alliance, which is a grassroots movement of patients, doctors, nurses, community organizers dedicated to bringing about a better health system.  We have 11 councils and chapters formed or forming in half a dozen cities. I would like nothing more than at the end of this talk, for every one of you to go to www.rightcarealliance.org and sign up.

But first, I want to tell you a bit about why I’m here and what radicalized me. My father, Mick Brownlee, died three years ago this Thanksgiving, and through his various ailments over the course of the previous 30 years, I’ve seen the best of medicine, and the worst.

My father was a sculptor and a scholar, but he was also a stoic, so when he began suffering debilitating headaches in his early 50s, he ignored them, until my stepmother saw him stagger and fall against a wall in the kitchen, clutching his head. She took him to the local emergency room, at a small community hospital in eastern Oregon. This was the 1970s, and the hospital had just bought a new fangled machine—a CT scanner, which showed a mass just behind his left ear. It would turn out to be a very slow growing cancer, a meningioma, that was successfully removed, thanks to the wonders of CT and brain surgery. What a miracle!

Fast forward 15 years, and Mick was prescribed a statin drug for his slightly elevated cholesterol. One day, he was fine. The next he wasn’t, not because his cholesterol had changed, but the cutoff point for statin recommendations had been lowered. Not long after Mick began taking the statin, he began feeling tired and suffering mild chest pain, which was written of as angina. What we didn’t know at the time was the statin was causing his body to destroy his muscles, a side effect called rhabdomyolysis. Even his doctor didn’t recognize his symptoms, because back then, the drug companies hid how often patients suffered this side effect.

The statin caught up with Mick at an exhibit in Seattle of Chinese bronzes, ancient bells and other sculptures that my father had been studying in art books his whole career. Halfway through the exhibit, he told my brother to take him home; he was too tired to take another step.

Three days later, he was in the hospital on dialysis. The rhabdomyolysis had finally begun to destroy his kidneys. Three weeks later, he was sent home alive with one kidney barely functional. Soon his health would begin to deteriorate at a steady pace.

Big Names, Big Ideas at Health 2.0 Fall Conference

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The Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference has harnessed the creativity and passion of health care’s brightest professionals to tackle the industry’s most intractable problems and leverage technology-enabled solutions to drive more compassionate, more accessible patient-centered care.

Check out the full agenda of our eleventh show, Oct. 1-4, in the heart of Silicon Valley.

Our killer line up of speakers covers the full spectrum of healthcare, and includes:

Innovative leaders, including Jason Pyle, CEO of Base Health; Simon Kos, CMO of Microsoft; Aashima Gupta, Global Head, Healthcare Solutions, Google; Brian Otis, CTO of Verily Life Sciences; Daniel Kraft, Founder and Chair of Exponential Medicine; and Jeff Margolis, CEO of Welltok.

Policymakers, such as HHS CTO Bruce Greenstein; ONC National Coordinator Don Rucker; former ONC Director David Brailer; and former U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra.

Patient advocates, including Dave DeBronkart (e-Patient Dave) and Patient Power President Andrew Schorr.

Representatives from more than two dozen major health systems, including UPMC, Mount Sinai, Dignity Health, UCSF, and more!

Major healthcare investors, including Providence Ventures, Merck Ventures, GE Ventures, and more!

Check out our full line up of speakers.

Limited amount of tickets are available. Register Today to secure your place at the Fall Conference-event starts this Sunday.

Until Death (or Recertification) Do Us Part

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By RICHARD DUSZAK, MD 

The online membership forum of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) blew up this week in response to an email announcement by the American Board of Radiology (ABR) that it will effectively be doing away with lifetime diagnostic radiology certificates for interventionalists whose original certificates pre-dated the introduction of time-limited certificates. Interventionalists were given two choices:

1.     You can keep your lifetime diagnostic certificate if you give up your (earned) interventional subspecialty certification, or

2.     You can keep your interventional certification, if you give up your lifetime diagnostic certification.

Talk about choice.

The Best Part Of The Health 2.0 Fall Conference Agenda

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There’s still time to secure your ticket before prices increase to this year’s Health 2.0 11th Annual Fall Conference. Whether you’re a Health Provider, Entrepreneur or Investor; the Fall Conference is the place to see the latest health technology, to hear from some of the influential innovators impacting the landscape, and to network with hundreds of health care decision makers. Click here for the full agenda.

Health Providers Agenda Highlights 
Entrepreneurs Agenda Highlights 
  • MarketConnect: A live matchmaking event designed to accelerate the health tech buying and selling process by curating meetings between pre-qualified healthcare executives and innovators.
  • Exhibit Hall: Gain access to 90+ exhibitors, including Startup Alley, is the premier gathering of innovative companies and individuals. The exhibit floor is also home to MarketConnect Live.
  • Developer Day: Expect your day to be filled with strong technical sessions in relation to interoperability and user testing as well as opportunities to network from others in the industry.
  • 2 CEOs and a President Session: Three top health tech executives sit down for separate intimate interviews with a journalist. They will be dishing on both their personal and company journeys.
Investors Agenda Highlights 
  • Investor Breakfast: Bringing together leaders in the Health 2.0 investment community and our innovative startup network for an exclusive breakfast meeting.
  • Investing in Health 2.0 Technologies: Panel experts will address what’s in store for the rest of the year and predict the next big bets in Silicon Valley and beyond.
  • Launch!: Ten brand new companies unveil their products for the very first time and the audience votes on the winner!
  • Traction!: Annual startup pitch competition that recruits companies ready for Series A in the $2-12M range. Teams will compete in two tracks, consumer-facing, and professional facing technologies.

Click here to register for the Annual Fall Conference! Prices increase after September 4th!

Parsely Health Interview & Job Ad!

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A little while back I caught up with former Health 2.0er Robin Berzin. (I first ran this video interview on Facebook). She’s a functional medicine doctor and now CEO of Parsley Health, a direct pay/concierge functional medicine clinic that also uses lots of new health tech. It’s operating in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Robin has an interesting model and is also looking for help. (And I’m running this ad for love not money!) Any MDs out there wanting to try a new route, see her blurb below the interview.

Parsley Health is hiring top primary care doctors at its centers in NYC, SF, and LA. At Parsley Health we practice whole-person Functional Primary Care focused on nutrition wellness and prevention along with advanced diagnostic testing. In addition we are building a groundbreaking new technology platform for primary care and offer both virtual and in-person services. If you are a physician and are looking to join a collaborative modern practice please visit our job description here or email your CV to [email protected]. Preference given to board-certified internal medicine and family medicine trained MDs with additional training in functional medicine. Additional clinical training available.

Kyruus “load balancing” health care — Julie Yoo Interview

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Continuing my interviews with various health tech players from HIMSS17, Julie Yoo MD may be one of the brightest people in health IT. She and her colleague Graham Gardner founded Kyruus to deal with one of the most complex problems in health care. The issue is the patient accessing the right doctor/provider, which is somewhat equivalent to getting everyone in the right plane to the right vacation (or in computer speak “load balancing“). While this sounds simple it’s a very complex issue with both a huge data problem (tracking which doctors are available and do what) and a rationalization issue (what patient needs what). Julie explains the problem and how Kyruus works with provider systems to fix it.

Homme Fatale

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Halfway through the “Bell Curve,” which is an analysis of differences in intelligence between races, I realized what had been bothering me about Charles Murray’s thesis. It wasn’t the accuracy of his analysis, which concerned me, too. It was that he analyzed. The truth, I used to believe, was always beautiful, whether it was what happened in the multiverse at T equals zero, or the historical counterfactual if Neville Chamberlain hadn’t signed the peace accord with Adolph Hitler. After reading Murray’s book, I realized that the truth can be irrelevant, ugly, and utterly useless. Even if the average intelligence of races was truly different, so what? Surely, civilized people must judge each other as individuals, regardless of the veracity of the statistical baggage of their ethnicities.

Murray was castigated, deservedly, for swallowing the bell curve uncritically. But his detractors missed one point. Murray wasn’t just wrong because he was factually wrong or for inquiring. In fact, it was worse, because Murray, it turned out, was wronger than wrong.

Two Nations Separated by 5.3 mm

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A popular meme is that the U.S. spends more on healthcare than other developed nations but has nothing to show for that spending. This is different from saying that the U.S. spends more, but achieves something, but the something it achieves is so little that it isn’t worth the public purse. The latter is difficult to assert because the asserter must then say how little is too little in regards to how much is spent, and why. It is easier believing the excess spending has no effect whatsoever, zilch in fact, because this absolves one from having to apply a value judgment on how much a life is worth. This meme, a convenient heuristic, like other convenient heuristics, is wrong.

A recent study looked at trends and outcomes in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the U.S. and the U.K. An aneurysm, dilation of the aorta, is more likely to burst the bigger it gets. Aneurysms should be repaired before they rupture because the mortality of ruptured aneurysms can be 50 %. The study, which analyzed several databases that recorded surgery, size of aneurysms, and cause of death, found that Americans repair twice as many aneurysms as the Brits, and the repaired AAAs are smaller, on average, in the U.S. Between 2005-2012 elective AAA repair (i.e. repair of non-ruptured aneurysms) increased from 27 to 32 per 100, 000 in the U.K, and from 58 to 64 per 100, 000 in the U.S.

Precision Primary Prevention

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If you’re going to indulge in anticipatory medicine, it is best to anticipate those at highest risk. An elegant study by Wald et al in the NEJM shows how precision primary prevention can be done. The researchers screened toddlers, who presented routinely to their general practitioners for vaccinations, for an uncommon, but not rare, familial predisposition to high cholesterol known as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), in which premature cardiovascular death can be deferred by statins and lifestyle changes. Blood drawn from the toddlers by a heel prick was tested for serum cholesterol and genetic mutations indicative of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). The parents of toddlers who met criteria for FH were also tested for cholesterol and genetic mutations. Obviously identifying affected parents, and increasing their longevity, is also beneficial for their children.