Health 2.0

Health 2.0

Elation’s Kyna Fong on a new type of EMR company

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There’s so much happening in the Health 2.0 world of new technology in health that it’s hard to keep up. AI, VR, AR, Blockchain–and they’re just the buzzwords keeping the VCs happy. So this year I’ve decided to try to interview more interesting new companies to keep you in the know. We’ll see how long that resolution lasts but first up is Kyna Fong, CEO of ElationHealth. Yes, she left a Stanford tenure-track professorship to start an EMR company, and no, she doesn’t sound crazy! This is an in-depth interview including a decent length demo, and it hints at how companies like hers might solve the conundrum of EMRs being necessary but impossible to use.

Interview–Nelli Lähteenmäki, CEO You-App

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YOU-app is one of those interesting consumer/wellness/mindfulness apps that is making inroads on the consumer side. CEO Nelli Lähteenmäki, who splits time between Finland and San Francisco, stopped by my office to give an update! Fun fact: she sings in a rock band in her spare time. That video to come later, for now her interview is below.

Harnessing Data and Analytics to Transform the Healthcare Industry

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sam-osbornAs organizations in every industry invest heavily in business intelligence and analytics to transform their business models, healthcare providers are looking for opportunities to catch up. The challenges to digital transformation in the healthcare industry are significant, but the opportunities are tremendous as applying modern analytics can dramatically speed and improve quality of care while also creating opportunities for new revenue streams and customer retention.

Take, for example, the transformational opportunities presented by applying analytics to Electronic Health Records (EHRs). By applying a layer of advanced analytics to EHRs, providers can identify areas for improvement and opportunity, which is especially important when you consider that these insights can anticipate outcomes and inform actions that can directly affect (and improve) the standard of care.

Analytics aren’t just improving the quality of patient care; they are creating entirely new revenue opportunities in the healthcare industry. MediGain for example, which provides revenue cycle management services to medical practices, hospitals and other care providers, was able to harness advanced analytics to combine data from 300+ sources to deliver on-demand revenue management analytics to their clients. As a result, reporting time was reduced from weeks to near real-time, greatly improving client performance while earning MediGain 1044 percent ROI.

These are just a few examples of healthcare companies leveraging their data and analytics to transform their businesses. These services are no longer optional offerings; Nucleus Research confirms that customers are demanding accessibility to analytics in their daily workflow, meaning that organizations need adapt and offer these solutions in order to remain competitive.

GoodData recently partnered with Anne Moxie, Sr. Analyst of Nucleus Research and Ian Maurer, CIO at MediGain to create a webinar that features the latest strategies and tactics that healthcare companies are using to turn their data and analytics into a profit center, click this link to view on-demand session.

Sam Osborn is head of content at GoodData. This is post is published in conjunction with GoodData‘s sponsorship of the Health 2.0 Conference

Want to help Technologies for Healthy Communities?

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Health 2.0 is actively expanding Technology for Healthy Communities and looking for large healthcare organizations and foundations to help support technology adoption at a community level.

Technology for Healthy Communities is a dynamic pilot program designed to catalyze the adoption of technologies in communities. The program fosters the development of sustainable partnerships to address the social determinants of health in the under-served regions that need it the most. Over 200 innovators across the U.S. submitted applications to the program, and through curated matchmaking and access to funding, selected innovators were matched with three participating communities to conduct pilot projects.

Snapshot of the three pilots:

  • Spartanburg, SC: ACCESS Health Spartanburg, a non-profit agency primarily working with the uninsured population, is piloting with Healthify to provide community interventions for social determinants of health at the point of care. With support from Spartanburg Way to Wellville and the Mary Black Foundation, the pilot aims to address current pain points in community health care, such as the inefficiency of addressing social needs of patients and helping to make case management easier.
  • Jacksonville, FL: The City of Jacksonville and the Health Planning Council of NE Florida, with support from the Clinton Foundation is piloting with CTY to deploy its signature product, NuminaTM. With this technology, bicycle and pedestrian traffic data will be collected to assess current safety conditions and plan improvements in the built environment for residents to be more physically active.
  • Alameda County, CA: The Community Health Center Network is piloting with Welkin Health to implement a case management tool that engages members and eases current healthcare worker burden. Together, they will pilot this case management tool in four centers to help community health workers to effectively and efficiently coordinate care.

Due to the high demand from tech innovators and communities, Health 2.0 is expanding the program to new communities, tech startups and organizations who can benefit from technology adoption. By addressing the social determinants of health, the program has the potential to implement unique tech applications and address some of the most important systemic issues at the community level.

Health 2.0 is looking for partners such as foundations, large health systems and corporations who want to support pilots to test innovations in communities, interact with the fastest growing startups in the tech scene, and help create business opportunities for technology companies. Program sponsors will also have the opportunity to address local health needs by bringing exciting, new technologies to under-served regions across the U.S.

The program will focus on tools that support access to a healthy lifestyle, in categories such as:

  • Access to healthcare services
  • Food insecurity
  • Affordable housing
  • Behavioral/mental health

If you are interested in partnering with Health 2.0 to help deliver technology to communities, contact [email protected] to learn about opportunities to support the program.

Alexandra Camesas is a program manager at Catalyst @ Health 2.0

CareCloud raises $31.5m–Interview with CEO Ken Comee

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Just in case you didn’t realize there still is a world going on despite last week’s election. Back in health technology, a systemic change is happening as older client-server companies (like McKesson) retreat or open up their technology (Allscripts) while investors still believe that there’s a big market for SMAC technology and cloud-based systems to run the next generation of American health care. More evidence of that today with the news that CareCloud has raised another $31.5 million to double down on the already large bet placed on it by its investors as a platform for growing medical groups. I talked to CEO Ken Comee about the company, the state of the market, and what he expects to do with the money! — Matthew Holt

So what does Trump mean for new health tech?

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Matthew-Holt-colorI’m a pundit who like everyone else was surprised by Trump’s victory in the (profoundly undemocratic and hopefully-to-be-abolished-soon) electoral college, and everything I say here is prefaced by the fact that there was very little discussion of healthcare specifics by Trump. So there’s no certainty about what will happen–to state the obvious about his administration!

What we do know is that Trump said he’d repeal & replace the ACA and the House has voted to repeal it many times (but the Senate has only once & Obama has always vetoed that repeal). A full and formal repeal requires 60 votes in the Senate which it won’t get with the Democrats holding 48. Note that the Democrats needed 60 votes to to forestall a Republican filibuster in order to pass the ACA in 2010. That 60 vote total is a very rare state of events which existed for only only one year–from Jan 2009 until Scott Brown won Ted Kennedy’s old seat in Jan 2010 and one we likely won’t see again for many years.

But this doesn’t does not mean things will continue as usual for two reasons. Congress can change the budget with the Republican 52 seat Senate majority, and the Administration can change regulations and stop enforcing them. So we have to assume that the new Administration and its allies(?) on the Hill will roll back the expansion of Medicaid which was responsible for most of the reduction in the uninsured (even if it didn’t happen in every state). They’ll also reduce or eliminate the subsidies which enable about 10m people to buy insurance using the exchanges. Both of those were in the repeal bill Obama vetoed, although in the bill the process was delayed for 2 years.

This of course may not happen or may be replaced by something equivalent because many of the people who voted for Trump (the rural, white, lower-income voters) fall into the category of those helped by the law, and in a few of his remarks he’s also said that he’ll be taking care of them. Even this week Senator Wicker (R-Mississippi) said that they weren’t going to take away 20 million people’s insurance. In Kentucky which went from a Democratic to Republican governor 2 years ago, the new administration ended their local exchange (from 2017), but in fact not much consequential happened as people were sent to the Federal exchange. If there are changes to the exchanges and the individual mandate or they’re both abolished, there’ll be lots of commotion but it won’t be completely system changing.

My day job at Health 2.0 involves running a conference and innovation program based on a community of companies using SMAC technologies to change health care services and delivery–either by starting new types of health care services or selling those technologies to the current incumbents. So I’m acutely interested in what happens next, albeit somewhat biased about my preferences!

Overall I think that (unlike many other areas of American life) health care technology won’t be that greatly affected. 

Michelle Longmire, CEO Medable

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I never ceased to be amazed by how smart young clinicians solve problems that they see. Michelle Longmire was in residency at Stanford working with colleagues building point solutions when she realized that what they needed was an easy platform on which to develop medical grade apps. Her company Medable was the result. Then she realized that the other big market was clinical researchers, who now have access to Apple’s ResearchKit, but need an easy way to build a study without using developers. I interviewed her recently and she built a study for me using Medable’s new Axon product.

Interview with Rasu Shrestha, CIO at UPMC

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More about Health 2.0 Rasu Shrestha, CIO at the University of Pittsburg Medical Center, will be joining me on stage this afternoon in our Provider Symposium (on his birthday) and again on Tuesday, September 27th for our Information Blocking, APIs & App Stores: The State of Play in Data Access session. Below is the interview I had with him a couple of weeks ago about how a huge medical center like UPMC deals with the innovation side of the house. Not too late to sign up and come to Health 2.0 and come hear what else Rasu has to say!

A chat with Ian Morrison

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My old friend and former boss Ian Morrison will be giving the keynote at Health 2.0’s 10th Annual Fall Conference on the afternoon of Tuesday, September 27thIan was President of Institute for the Future in the 1990s, founded the Strategic Health Perspectives service, and is in more health care board rooms and conference halls than almost anyone. At Health 2.0, Ian will share his latest insights into the future of health care. Did we tell you he’s the pre-eminent jokester on the health care speaking circuit? Well he is! You can still Register and come hear what else Ian has to say! But here’s a taster — Matthew Holt

The Nordics at Health 2.0

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By now you all know that the 10th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference is next week. What you may not know is that it’s a great place to meet delegates from across the world. In particular both tech companies and providers & government officials from from Scandinavia will be there next week. Below are Ase Bailey (TINC in Silicon Valley/Innovation Norway) & Anne Lidgard (VINNOVA/Innovation Sweden) talking about the Nordic group’s visit to Health 2.0. By the way, for those in the Bay Area, there’s a reception with the Nordic delegation at the Nordic House in Palo Alto on Thursday nightMatthew Holt