Health 2.0

At Health 2.0 WinterTech: The New Consumer Health Landscape speakers and sponsors are exploring the platforms that empower the informed consumer movement by providing objective reviews of consumer products. Senior Director, of Health Impact and Consumer Reports, Tara Montgomery will be joining the event to speak to their research on the health products, prescriptions, and providers that contribute to the changing consumer health landscape.

Health 2.0: Tara can you start by speaking to what really pushed this expansion into research and advocacies surrounding health products and when you sort of saw this started shifting?

Tara Montgomery: Yes. Well, actually, you might not know, but we have been in health since day one, and it was actually in our charter back in 1936 to look out for the well-being of all consumers. We started in our very first issue of our magazine and we rated Alka-Seltzer and said that its claims vanish — like gas bubbles in the air.  So that was our first foray into health, but that was in a small scale, and I think it was typical of the kinds of health products being advertised to consumers earlier in the 20th century, but over the decades, we covered health lightly. And then, really, about 10 years ago, we saw the shift in healthcare where the consumer’s role really was shifting much more consciously from a compliant patient to a need to be a more savvy health consumer. That was a real call to action for us because our role in helping consumers out in the world is really to give people savvy information about value, and everything we’ve done in washing machines and cars and toasters has been about helping people evaluate the benefits, their satisfaction, and the value for money of the products and services they choose. When the burden of health costs started to shift towards consumers, and you know that definitely has been more intense in the past couple of years, we’ve needed to rise to the occasion and helpconsumers navigate that new role. So, that was a moment for us along with transparency, because when we wanted to rate healthcare products and services more than 10 years ago, the data wasn’t available, and obviously, you can’t look at health the same way as we look at cars and washing machines and bang — our national lab. Continue reading “Fact vs Fiction – Navigating the Health Care Marketplace with Consumer Reports”

As Health 2.0 gears up for Health 2.0 WinterTech, January 15th in San Francisco, their reporters sat down with Environmental Working Group Executive Director, Heather White to discuss the many pathways consumer health advocacy takes and the barriers that continue to keep many of us in the dark about the relationship between our health and our environment.

Health 2.0: To get things started, Heather, I wanted to talk with you a little bit about some of the insight you’ll be providing at WinterTech, which is in relation to the Skin Deep App. From what I’ve researched, it offers ratings on over 70,000 products. I was hoping you could share your thoughts on how you and your team envisioned this app and the way it’s changing how consumers shop for skin products, and what has been the response thus far?

Heather White: Yeah. Well, it definitely has been making waves in the market for a pretty long time. Our site was developed 10 years ago, but we launched our app last year. So far, we’ve had about 300,000 downloads on iPhone and about 95,000 on Android, so close to 400,000 consumers have downloaded the app and are able to make decisions on safer cosmetics and personal care products right at the store. So, we’ve gotten a lot of response and support from our community, but we’re also finding that our brand is reaching a much broader audience. It’s really exciting for us because EWG is all about making sure people make this connection between our health and the environment and really start thinking about the environment as something that they connect to everyday. It’s not just that place you go on vacation, but it also incorporates the chemicals that you buy and that you put on your skin and the chemicals that you buy and then you bring into your home. Skin Deep is trying to really push the market for safer cosmetics and we’ve really seen a lot of consumers make more switches to safer alternatives and we’re also seeing each day new brands coming onto the markets that are less toxic. So, there’s been a tremendous response so far. It’s a free app. It’s available both on the Android and iPhone and our supporters and people who are interested in this issue have really welcomed it.

Continue reading “Health is All Around Us : How Our Environment Informs Our Health”

One of the greatest opportunities that exists in moving from “turnstile medicine” (or fee-for-service) to value-based payment models is the shift from reactive to proactive health care. The focus on accountability for population health forces providers to adopt a completely different mindset: Instead of waiting for sick patients to come knocking on your door, you need to figure out what they need, when they need it, and how to get it for them.

At the upcoming conference, Health 2.0 WinterTech: The New Consumer Health Landscape (January 15, San Francisco), I will moderate a panel on “Consumer Data Powering Clinical Insight.” The panel  features several different perspectives on how consumer-facing technologies can translate discrete consumer-generated data into useful information that providers and others can use to deliver more personalized and proactive support and care management.

The dramatic proliferation of electronic health records (EHRs) in the last five years means that much more clinical patient data exists in electronic form than ever before. True meaningful use of that data involves organizing it into meaningful and useful information by building algorithms, leveraging machine learning principles and delivering the right information to the right person at the right time. In addition, de-identified data in the cloud provides a scale for that kind of data analytics. Practice Fusion, a cloud-based EHR company uses patient-derived data—everything from booking an appointment to patient intake questionnaires—to drive proactive health management. CEO Ryan Howard will discuss how, in early 2015, they’ll begin incorporating qualitative and quantitative data from the patient and machine learning based on how physicians react to it to better target diagnosis, treatment and other support.

Continue reading “Reactive vs. Proactive Health Care: The Intersection of Payment Reform & Consumer Data Powering Clinical Insight”

Erick & Linda von Schweber started Surveyor Health around the time Health 2.0 started back in 2007, with the BHAG of massively improving medication safety using some very complex technology. And it has taken them a long time to embed themselves in the bowels of some huge health care organizations and to start getting traction. But it is finally happening and the impact may be substantial. I interviewed Erick and he gave me a comprehensive demo and update on their latest results. If you care about drugs and clinical care, this is compelling (if not lightweight!) viewing. (I suggest you switch to full screen for the demo).

Yesterday XPRIZE announced the 11 finalists for the second phase of the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE. This is a $2.25m prize competition to advance the ability to use sensors to measure and manage health, and it’s something that we’re fascinated by at Health 2.0. You may recall that the first round’s winners were unveiled live on stage at the 2013 Health 2.0 Fall Conference by our friends at XPRIZE and Nokia.

UPDATE–The hangout is embedded above. To find out a little more, please come to a Google Hangout at 10 am Pacific/ 1pm EST Wednesday where I’ll be chatting with Dr. Erik Viirre, Medical and Technical Director of the Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE and the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE; Jonanthan Linkous, Chief Executive Officer of the American Telemedicine Association; Jon Dreyer, President of Health IT Strategic Partners; Dr. Manas Gartia from team MoboSense, a Distinguished Award winner in the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE Competition #1; and Dr. Marc Bailey from Nokia Technologies.

You can also see videos of the finalist teams and their breakthrough technologies can be viewed and voted on beginning today through October 30 at http://www.nokiasensingxchallengevoting.org. More on the teams below the fold:

Continue reading “SENSING XCHALLENGE, with Google Hangout Wednesday at 10 PST”

logo2
Viewics
is a health care data analytics company that uses a cloud-based SaaS model to provide health care organization with solutions to improve their operational, financial and clinical outcomes. Viewics raised $8M in additional funding today, in a round led by Canvas Venture Fund. This is the second funding round for the company this year. Earlier this February, it raised an undisclosed amount from a group of savvy Silicon Valley investors, including Morado Ventures’ Farzad Nazem, who also is the former Yahoo CTO, and AME Cloud Ventures, a venture capital group led by Yahoo’s founder and former CEO, Jerry Yang.

Viewics’ flagship product, Viewics Health Insighter (VHI), allows health care organizations to have a standardized suite of analytics tools to aggregate, extract and share insights from the vast amounts of data in their information systems. It eliminates the hassle of developing an internal business intelligence infrastructure. Viewics has over 100 hospitals and laboratories as its customers, and processes data for 20 million patients across multiple departments and visits. The VHI data aggregation platform enables clinical analysis on a database representing 650 million tests. Continue reading “Viewics: Changing the World of Health Care Data”

flying cadeuciiI hate to give away all the punch lines from my California Healthcare Foundation report on healthcare accelerators, so you will just have to read it for yourself. However, a few extra tidbits that didn’t make it in are here below (as you can imagine, I can’t be quite as Lisa-ish in a commissioned report as in my blog). Among my many discussions with a myriad of willing report interviewees (thanks to all of you!), I started collecting some funny stories that I have begun to refer to as Tales from the Accelerator Crypt. A few of them are here below for your amusement.

  • From an East Coast Economic Development-Focused AcceleratorBy far the worst idea pitched to us was from a company that proposed to prevent falls among the elderly with a vest containing an airbag whose deployment is triggered by EEG signals coming from a wearable computer brain interface.  It’s probably obvious why this is so insane. Getting beyond who might actually wear such a thing around their home or to bed, can you imagine the number of erroneous deployments from the notoriously unpredictable, noisy EEG signal?  If only they had made a video. That same week in the same city, I was amazed to be introduced to a rival company also developing a wearable airbag for accidental falls, but at least this one was triggered by an accelerometer.  File under “You know wearables have jumped the shark when…”
  • From a University Program in CAThe most awful pitch we had was from a clinician-entrepreneur whose answer to every probing question on commercial viability was “This is going to save countless lives.” It was his answer to every question, clinical to operational to financial. The most entertaining stage moment, however, was when a CEO of a company developing a ‘next generation’ needle-free injector did a live demonstration of his product by injecting himself with saline while up on stage doing his pitch. He unbuttoned his shirt, gave himself the shot and buttoned up again, claiming how painless it was. As he continued to speak, blood pooled and spread from the injection site, down his arm and across his entire white shirt. It was a slow motion disaster. He didn’t recover very well. Needless to say they didn’t win the demo day competition.

Continue reading “Tales From the Accelerator”

California-HealthCare-FoundationI am excited to announce that the California Health Care Foundation (CHCF) has just published a report, authored by me, about the state of healthcare Accelerators in the U.S. and around the world. For those of you who don’t know CHCF, it is a very large not-for-profit endowment that has a mission to improve the quality, cost and efficiency of healthcare delivered to the underserved populations of California. In so doing, they also provide a very valuable educational service to the overall healthcare community and fund the creation of reports like this one about Accelerators.

The new report, entitled Survival of the Fittest: Healthcare Accelerators Evolve Towards Specialization is available for download HERE.

This report is intended to update the report that CHCF released two years ago entitled “Greenhouse Effect: How Accelerators are Seeding Digital Health Innovation” about the then emerging field of healthcare Accelerators.   I would have to say that two years later in 2014, these programs have definitely emerged.

Continue reading “Healthcare Accelerators Evolve Towards Specialization”

By NIRAV DESAI

Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 8.54.48 AM“There’s an app for that” popularizes the fact that over 1 million apps for smartphones and tablets have been developed to address anything, from small to complex, that people may want to do. In the world of mobile health, or mHealth, we’re prone to agree.

According to IMS Health, there are over 23,000 healthcare-related apps covering numerous clinical areas (from primary care to surgery), care sites (from home to acute care), users (from patients, to caregivers, to clinicians) and parts of the patient journey (from wellness to complex chronic disease). And, a recent study we conducted found that 70 percent of people use mobile apps on a daily basis to track calorie intake and monitor physical activities.

But the view of the mHealth world as just a proliferation of apps, while exciting and important, is flawed in several ways:

  1. It ignores the fact that while apps may be primary user touch points in a mobile-connected world, they are not the only ones.
  2. It leaves people with the idea that all you have to do to solve a problem is build an app.  Often, the solution is much broader.

Healthcare is evolving beyond “there’s an app for that.” Here’s what’s happening…

Continue reading “mHealth – Beyond “There’s an app for that””

Jacob

Matthew Holt interviewed Jacob Reider, Deputy National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and Chief Medical Officer at the ONC, ahead of his appearance at the 8th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference. Jacob will be participating in several panels at Health 2.0, beginning with the Monday main stage panel ”Smarter Care Delivery: Amplifying the Patient Voice”.

In this interview, Jacob gives an overview of the HITECH program, the question of interoperability, and the broad adoption of technology in health care as an industry.  

Matthew Holt: So, let’s touch base on a couple of things. You’ve been in ONC some time now. Let’s talk about how the general HITECH program has gone and is going. If you were to get to rate it, the spread of EMRs and the usefulness of them, their usability, how would you say we’re doing so far?

Jacob Reider: I think we’re doing very well. Some of your readers know I went to college at a place that had no grades. So I’ll give you the narrative score.

The narrative score is that the program has been very successful achieving the goals that were defined at the outset. So the first iteration of the program, stage one, was all about getting organizations to adopt Health Information Technology, and I think all of the metrics that we’ve seen have validated that the program has been quite successful in accelerating the adoption of Health Information Technology, in both hospitals and practices. That doesn’t mean that we’re finished, but the vast majority of these organizations have now adopted Health Information Technology. Are there additional goals that we’d like to be able to meet? Absolutely, we’d like to see interoperability working better. As you mentioned, we would like the products to be more usable, and therefore, safer.

We’d like to see patients even more engaged than they currently are, so they have more access to the information in their records. We’d like to solve a problem that we’re starting to see in the industry, which I started to call hyperportalosis, which is that in any given community, there may be many portals that patients are expected to log in to. So we’re trying to think about how those problems can be solved in the next iteration of the HITECH program.

Continue reading “Countdown to Health 2.0 2014: Exclusive Interview with ONC Chief Medical Officer Jacob Reider”

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