Health 2.0

Health 2.0

Health 2.0 Asia: Japan Conference Partnership

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Tokyo, Japan – Health 2.0 announces the Health 2.0 Asia partnership with MedPeer, Inc. to showcase the Health 2.0 Asia conference Japan on November 4-5, 2015. The conference will be the first of a series of events expanding the global presence for Health 2.0 in Asia. This conference will feature ground-breaking insights and leadership within the global health care technology industry while showcasing cutting-edge technologies for user-generated health care. The conference will become a forum for attendees to build networks for exchanging innovative ideas and developing new business parternships, which will promote active inbound and outbound investment within the health-tech industry. MedPeer, Inc. will expand Health 2.0 activities across Japan in collaboration with local chapters by holding a series of health-tech hackathons.

About Health 2.0

Health 2.0 is the premiere showcase and catalyst for the advancement of new health technologies. Through a global series of conferences, thought leadership roundtables, developer competitions, pilot programs, and leading market intelligence, Health 2.0 drives the innovation and collaboration necessary to transform health and health care.

Media Contact
Sophie Park
[email protected]

Health 2.0 Europe–the view from hip Berlin

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It’s morning on Day 2 of Health 2.0 Europe. We’re at the on the campus of Charité Hospital and University of Medecine (in the old East Berlin) in the Langenbeck-Virchow Building which is now a conference center for medical societies but apparently was used as a part of the old GDR parliament before 1989.

Yesterday, we had a series of intense panel discussions, not least between the German members of the panel who were discussing (and disagreeing) on whether Health 2.0 tools could come “bottom up” or would have to fit in the rather slow creation of national electronic infrastructure for clinical care.

Getting to Pareto Optimality from Sermo–The Dan Palestrant interview

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Daniel Palestrant was one of the first big stars of the early Health 2.0 movement, and he was often at Health 2.0 conferences and on THCB. He founded the biggest (US based) online doctor network Sermo in 2005, rode it like a rocketship, and then left with little explanation in late 2011. Rumors swirled about the company, then it was bought by WorldOne, while Palestrant (and colleague Adam Sharp) was seen in a series of photos with a cutout of an obscure economist. He then seemingly vanished. Now he’s back, and the company named for that economist, Par8o, just announced a funding round of $10.5m and a series of impressive clients.

But what happened at Sermo? And how did that get him to Par8o? I met Dan for a in-depth reminiscence. But briefly in his words; all the investors (including him) in Sermo were happy with the WorldOne buyout; what he learned from the ACA was the inspiration for Par8o; and, he’s now building the underpinning health care operating system. We’ll have more later this week, but watch our catch up.

Patient Self-Scheduling 2.0

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thcbAs the digital economy transforms health the most transformative ideas and consumer engagement solutions can sometimes challenge the industry’s ability to adopt and implement them. Reimbursement reforms, risk sharing, migration towards high deductible plans and the expansion of public and private coverage are converging to unleash an increasingly sophisticated consumer into the marketplace. Health systems and physician practices are consolidating and marketing their services direct to consumers in an attempt to underscore the critical differentiators valued by consumers – access, quality and affordability.  In today’s consumer economy, access remains a critical criterion for choosing and patronizing a provider or a practice. To assist the move toward consumerism, employers are introducing tools to facilitate comparison-shopping for services seen as “consumer-driven.”  The cost of elective and non-emergency services are highly variable and employers want employees to become consumers making decisions based not only on access but also cost.

Attention Innovators: The My Air, My Health HHS/EPA Challenge is Open!

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When I came to work for EPA as an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow, I hoped to connect my social science background with my passion for the environment.  In my time on EPA’s Innovation Team, I’ve found such connections in places I never expected.  I’ve grown particularly excited about our work on portable air quality sensors.

As a psychologist, I have learned that people care about a problem more, and come up with better solutions, when they see how it affects them personally.  Air pollution is a great example—when people can measure particulates on their jogging route, it’s far more meaningful than just hearing about the issue on the news.

The My Air, My Health Challenge, announced yesterday by EPA’s Science Advisor Dr. Glenn Paulson and Dr. Linda Birnbaum of the National Institute of Environmental Health Science, aims to gather the best work in this area, and bring it to the next level.

The challenge calls on academics, industry researchers, and garage-lab do-it-yourselfers to connect wearable air and health sensors, allowing citizens and communities to collect highly localized data and create a meaningful picture of how the environment affects their well-being.

The data integration and analysis component of the challenge is particularly exciting.

A few weeks ago, I was privileged to attend the Apps and Sensors for Air Pollution workshop in Research Triangle Park, NC.  There, I listened to cutting edge sensor developers talk about their work.  They had some fascinating projects, ranging from cheap ozone monitors carried by students to a community initiative measuring black carbon in the homes of elders.  Our challenge took its final shape from these experts’ input.

Advances in Connected Health Sensor Technologies

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Most of the time I write about the psychology of patient, consumer or provider adoption.  This is not an accident.  The psychology of adoption is the next big hurdle for connected health to overcome.  We have good evidence that connected health solutions can be engaging and sticky for patients, leading to improved self-care. Likewise, we have evidence that enriching data coming from patients to providers can lead to better care decisions and that these decisions, made and delivered in the moment of need, are the other half of the magic of connected health. Further we have a sense that those patients who are not interested in the level of engagement that connected health demands often have worse outcomes and therefore cost the system more.

But today, I want to talk about technology.  Most of the time, I write from the perspective of a technology vision that includes continuous (or near continuous) sensing of multiple physiologic signals. These signals are flawlessly transmitted to a computing environment where decision support can be applied to aid in improved communication with patients and improved decision making by providers. The state of the art today is not so elegant.

We use multiple different sensors, both wired and wireless, communicating via a large variety of aggregator devices that then transmit the sensor outputs to us via the Internet.  The environment is both user-unfriendly and error prone, which increases the technical support resources required.   We have the strong sense that some individuals drop out of programs because the technology is too challenging for them, so we miss them before we can turn them on to the benefits of a connected health experience.

The marketplace for sensors is changing in a number of exciting, dynamic ways.  First, a number of sensors are coming to market that have embedded mobile chips right in them.  They are sold in the same way as the Amazon Kindle (the wireless connectivity is bundled in the price of the device).

Interview with Alex Savic, CEO of Alensa Next Widgets

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Alex Savic is CEO of Alensa NextWidgets, based in Zurich, Switzerland. Alex is a repeat presenter at Health 2.0 and will be presenting an update on the NextWidgets platform at Health 2.0 Europe in Paris April 6-7, 2010. NextWidgets allows pharmacies to sell their products online directly to consumers through widgets placed on relevant content publisher websites.

Indu Subaiya: Alex, tell us a bit about yourself and our background, and what Alensa is all about.

Alex Savic: I’ve been working in the generics industry since 2000, traveling a lot to India and Eastern Europe to meet with manufacturers and inspect manufacturing facilities. Alensa was mostly in the API and finished formulations business then. So to branch out, in 2006 we started working on an e-commerce platform for pharmacies which has since evolved into the NextWidgets platform.

GET Funded Service – What did we learn?

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Part of an EU-funded programme, the GET Funded service targeted European digital health SMEs looking for follow-up investments – typically between 0.5 and 2M € – and was designed to provide them with training, resources and networking opportunities with European investors. In two years, we worked with 50 start-ups, trained and placed over 30 of them on stage to pitch in front of investors. What did we learn?

The GET consortium started by identifying the European investors that were the most active in digital health: about a dozen dedicated funds plus a mix of corporate, health care, technology, and agnostic venture funds. We recruited about 40 we considered as ‘active’, a number that will grow as we witness the creation of new dedicated funds every year. 2015 saw the creation of one in particular that should be interesting to follow: AXA, already ahead of the game in terms of digital health reimbursements, now has a new dedicated investment fund.

Are Patients Becoming Day Traders?

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Let me say first that I am a practicing primary care doctor who is very much focused on patient centered care. Though I cannot go back to being a patient who is unaware about what a doctor does, the terminology she uses, or what the importance of certain test results are, I can empathize with the overwhelming amounts of information, challenges, and stressors patients and families can have in navigating the healthcare system to get the right care. This is the reason I wrote my book.

However, over the past few months I’ve noticed a particularly disturbing trend. Patients are not consulting doctors for advice, but rather demanding testing to force diagnoses which are not even remote possibilities. A little knowledge can be dangerous particularly in the context of little to no clinical experience. Where many patients are today are where medical students are at the end of their second year – lots of book knowledge but little to no real world experience.

More patients are becoming the day traders of the dot.com boom. Everyone has a hot stock tip, only now it is “be sure to ask your doctor for this test” or “ask for this medication because it is the only one that works”. Everyone is an expert with his own suggestion on what should be done. If a medical expert, like a doctor, weighs in and does not agree, then there is a set of patients and doctors who begin to argue that these doctors are out of touch or arrogant.

Hardly.

Conversa Wants to Fill the Gap

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Conversa is a brand new company, aiming to fill the space between physician visits with easy and useful communications between doctors and patients. The logic is that most health care happens outside the exam room, but most of the effort of automating health care has been put into recording what happens in the medical setting, with little feedback or follow up from patients (HealthLoop is another company aiming at this space).

Why are we featuring Conversa? Well somewhat unusually for a Health 2.0 startup they come with buckets of experience. CEO West Shell was at the helm at Healthline, Product Head Phil Marshall built lots of tools at WebMD and Chief Marketer Anna-Lisa Silvestre was behind the roll out of probably the biggest patient portal ever at Kaiser Permanente.

I got all three of them on the video-line to tell me about Conversa.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVD2f1VK24M&feature=youtu.be[/youtube]

Learn more about Conversa’s launch here.