Health 2.0

Health 2.0

The FDA & Me (or How to Explain Your Test Isn’t a Game)

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Lathan_HeadshotSo you have a great idea for an app. Not so fast: it took two years and over half a million dollars to get ours cleared for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Our app, DANA uses a mobile phone to records peoples’ reaction time during game-like tests. It also provides questionnaires that help clinicians evaluate brain health. Commissioned from AnthroTronix by the Department of Defense, the app will help diagnose concussion, depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

For something so important, a serious investment of time and money for clearance may not sound extravagant, but few small companies can afford a two-year go-to-market delay, not to mention the significant investment and heartache that goes with it. And although the FDA has tried to facilitate regulation by providing guides like the Mobile Medical Applications Guidance Document and the Mobile Medical Applications website, the regulatory process remains confusing.

Here are five simple lessons from our own experience that will help other entrepreneurs to do the right thing and engage with the FDA:

Accessing & Using APIs from Major EMR Vendors–Some Data at Last!

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Today I’m happy to release some really unique data about a pressing problem–the ability of small tech vendors to access health data contained in the systems of the major EMR vendors. There’ll be much more discussion of this topic at the Health 2.0 Provider Symposium on Sunday, and much more in the Health 2.0 Fall Annual Conference as a whole.

Information blocking, Siloed data. No real inter-operability. Standards that aren’t standards. In the last few years, the clamor about the problems accessing personal health data has grown as the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) increased post the Federally-funded HITECH program. But at Health 2.0 where we focus on newer health tech startups using SMAC (Social/Sensor; Mobile OS; Cloud; Analytics) technologies, the common complaint we’ve heard has been that the legacy–usually client-server based–EMR vendors won’t let the newer vendors integrate with them.

With support from California Health Care Foundation, earlier this year (2016) Health 2.0 surveyed over 100 small health tech companies to ask their experiences integrating with specific EMR vendors.

The key message: The complaint is true: it’s hard for smaller health tech companies to integrate their solutions with big EMR vendors. Most EMR vendors don’t make it easy. But it’s a false picture to say that it’s all the EMR vendors’ fault, and it’s also true that there is great variety not only between the major EMR vendors but also in the experience of different smaller tech companies dealing with the same EMR vendor. All the data is in the embedded slide set below, with much more commentary below the fold.

Can Community Health Organizations Pave the Way for Local Technology Adoption?

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It’s 6 AM and Anna’s alarm clock goes off. She has a busy day ahead of her, starting with getting her children to school, heading to her doctor’s appointment and taking on a double shift at her part time job. Anna is on a tight budget and has difficulty juggling work and her kids. On top of her often stressful situation at home, Anna suffers from Type 2 diabetes and has been inundated with medical bills. Although Anna doesn’t own a computer, her doctor introduced her to a smartphone application that helps her to monitor her glucose levels and communicate with her care team if she needs medical assistance.

Millions of individuals across the U.S. have experience with at least one aspect of Anna’s situation. As a country, the U.S. spends less money on social services and more on healthcare.1, 2 Yet, a large majority of what makes us sick can be attributed to the social determinants of health (SDOH)—factors such as socioeconomic status, availability of resources, employment and access to healthcare. While using technology to address social factors in underserved regions has generated momentum, it’s an area of healthcare and digital health that is emerging with the shift from reactive to proactive healthcare.

A Web 2.0 Interview with Miguel Cabrer, CEO of Medting

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Miguel Cabrer, the founder of MEDTING, a global site for the exchange of  medical information and images, will be a panelist at Health 2.0 Europe in Paris. Formerly CIO of Hospital Son Llatzer, the first digital hospital in Europe (European Commission eHealth Award in 2004) and eHealth Coordinator for the Balearic Islands Health Department,  Miguel Cabrer is now an independent eHealth Advisor, Member of the HIMSS EMEA Governing Council and Member of the IMIA Web 2.0 taskforce workgroup. Our Health 2.0 Regional Ambassador to Spain, Miguel even found the time to be interviewed by Denise Silber of Basil Strategies, Health 2.0’s partner in Europe!


Denise says: Please tell us the main reason for a physician to use Medting?

Miguel says: Physicians use Medting to share a clinical case with a colleague from anywhere in the world. They also store images and videos, build clinical cases, and access content for research and learning purposes. Content can be restricted to invitees only. A hospital or other organization can create its own extranet with the Medting Enterprise platform.

Denise says: How did you get the idea that there was a need for these different functionalities? Was it something you would have wanted when you were working in a hospital?  

The End Game–Live in Finland!

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some_1Today I am in Finland at the Vertical digital health accelerator, part of a really impressive network of accelerators and incubators in Helsinki. Tomorrow is the huge SLUSH festival at which I (plus Steven Krein of Startup Health) will be talking on Thursday. Today, I’m speaking and moderating a great seminar with excellent speakers at Vertical for the End Game.

The End Game
 is a thought leader seminar that finds answers to questions. The most insightful speakers from around the world will talk about digital health. Speakers include the Head of Health & Medical equipment division of Samsung France, the Head of Healthcare of Telia, and many others including Luis Barros VC expert from Boston.

 

The seminar is streaming live on www.endgame.fi on November 10th at 3pm Finnish time (8 am ET, 5 am PT) The video will also be available for later viewing.

Elation’s Kyna Fong on a new type of EMR company

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There’s so much happening in the Health 2.0 world of new technology in health that it’s hard to keep up. AI, VR, AR, Blockchain–and they’re just the buzzwords keeping the VCs happy. So this year I’ve decided to try to interview more interesting new companies to keep you in the know. We’ll see how long that resolution lasts but first up is Kyna Fong, CEO of ElationHealth. Yes, she left a Stanford tenure-track professorship to start an EMR company, and no, she doesn’t sound crazy! This is an in-depth interview including a decent length demo, and it hints at how companies like hers might solve the conundrum of EMRs being necessary but impossible to use.

Interview with Stuart Fletcher, CEO, Bupa

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Founded in 1947, the United Kingdom private health insurance provider, Bupa, predates the National Health Service. Today Bupa is a global health care company, which includes subsidiary Health Dialog in the United Sates. CEO Stuart Fletcher explains Bupa’s decision to buy the health care management company.

Matthew Holt Interviews Avizia CMO, Alan Pitt

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One in a series of interviews that should have been posted months ago, but Matthew Holt is just getting to now.

Alan Pitt is an old friend of the family at Health 2.0. He’s a Professor of Neuroradiology at Barrow Neurological Institute, and now the Chief Medical Officer of Avizia. He has been working with patient-provider collaboration tools for several years now, and previously co-founded Excelsius Robotics (now acquired by Globus Medical).

Avizia spun off from Cisco in 2013. Now it provides a collaboration technology services to hospitals. Recently, Avizia secured $11m in Series A funding to expand their telehealth platform. Back in February at HIMSS, Matthew Holt interviewed Alan to see what the patient-provider platform looks like.

Priya Kumar is an Intern at Health 2.0, and a student at George Washington University

Personalized Cancer Services are Needed: GuideWell is Calling on You

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The moment you are diagnosed with cancer, you become a survivor. You now live with a daunting illness. Your everyday monotonous activities turn into new challenges, flooding your thoughts with countless questions and new struggles. In the 2006 National Survey of U.S. Households Affected by Cancer, 15% of respondents said they had the experience of leaving a doctor’s office without answers to important questions about their illness. And, even when patients do have the relevant information to cope with their illness, a lack of logistical and material resources, such as transportation, medical equipment, and supplies, can often prevent them from ever actually using the suggested support. GuideWell is launching the GuideWell Cancer Challenge to crowdsource ideas about concierge services to help the millions living with cancer understand and access the services they need.

GuideWell is calling on everyone, from developers creating solutions to patients who can share their own insights, to come together and solve this issue. We need you to join the movement and participate in the challenge. When you visit the GuideWell Cancer Challenge website you can submit your ideas, provide insights that can spark someone else’s creativity or comment on others’ ideas with your feedback and suggestions. You can even participate by simply voting for the ideas you like the best. This challenge is your chance to get involved in Greater than C>ncer: The Immersion Journey, an initiative powered by the American Cancer Society with the goal of gaining a better understanding of these problems and potential solutions. The GuideWell Steering Committee will evaluate all ideas and insights, and award prizes totaling $12,000. In addition to cash prizes, the best ideas will also be shared within the GuideWell ecosystem through an online and printed publication.

The deadline for submitting all ideas and insights is April 28, 2017. If you have an idea, go ahead and SUBMIT IT! Or, simply browse submissions and VOTE for your favorite. If you want to learn more about the challenge, or have questions about the process REGISTER for the Q&A WEBINAR to be held on March 30, 2017 at 3:30 PM ET.

Validic meets Cerner–Drew Schiller speaks

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Validic is one of the more interesting companies in what we define as the “data utility layer.” They’ve had a bit of a meteoric rise in the past 2 years, and now have over 45 employees, over 90 customers and are now one of the main names that come up when the conversation turns to “how do we get all that device data into the EHR?” Today they announced a new deal with Cerner (release here). This is the quick interview with CTO Drew Schiller.

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