Health 2.0

Health 2.0

Healthcare CEOs Weigh In On Technology and the Growing Importance of Social Collaboration

4

Technology is transforming health care in many ways. CEOs of health care businesses think the biggest transformation in the next few years will come from making patients, doctors and health-care workers more communicative and collaborative.

They foresee patients with the same rare diseases coming together in online social networks where they can discuss their symptoms. They see overweight consumers building mutual support networks to share diets and praise exercise. They anticipate that knowledge will be shared so that nurses, pharmacists and social workers can often perform tasks that today are handed to doctors by default.

Every year, IBM surveys hundreds of CEOs from around the globe about a variety of issues. Among 1,700 CEOs surveyed this year there were 58 who head hospitals, medical practice groups and insurers.

The CEO perspective is interesting, because most outsiders don’t think of collaboration as being a key outcome of medical technology. Most of us think of laser-guided surgical instruments or designer drugs or computerized analytics that spot hitherto unnoticed disease-causation chains.

The CEOs overall see technology as a way to open up their organizations to create value through collaboration. Making the organization more transparent makes it easier to share cultural values and goals. And that makes employees more receptive to tough changes, because they understand what’s behind the plan.

Health 2.0 Unveils “10 Year Global Retrospective”

1

10 Year Global Retrospective Graphic_Option 1 Final

Health 2.0 announced today its  “10 Year Global Retrospective”, a platform to recognize outstanding achievements in health tech over the past ten years.

For nearly a decade, Health 2.0 has served as the preeminent thought-leader in the health tech sector and showcased and connected with thousands of technologies, companies, innovators, and patient-activists through an array of events and conferences, challenges, code-a-thons, and more. Since its first conference in 2007, Health 2.0 has grown into a global movement with over 100,000 entrepreneurs, developers, and healthcare stakeholders, and 110+ chapters on six continents.

In recognition of its 10th year, Health 2.0 will honor the superstars of the health tech community over the past decade through the global retrospective, a platform which will poll the collective insight of its vast network of health tech stakeholders who will nominate and vote for the top influencers in four categories.

Ayasdi–Big Data changing hospital operations

0

One of the more interesting companies playing in the analytics space is Ayasdi. We’ve featured them at Health 2.0 a couple of times, but at HIMSS I got a chance to talk a little more in depth with chief medical officer Francis Campion about exactly how they parse apart huge numbers of data points, usually from EMRs, and then operationalize changes for their clients. The end result is more effective care and lower variability across different facilities, for example changing when drugs are delivered before surgery in order to improve outcomes. And increasingly their clients are doing this over multiple clinical pathways. They’re really on the cutting edge of how data will change care delivery (a tenet of our definition of Health 2.0) so watch the interview to hear and see more!

Health 2.0 Asia: Japan Conference Partnership

0

Tokyo, Japan – Health 2.0 announces the Health 2.0 Asia partnership with MedPeer, Inc. to showcase the Health 2.0 Asia conference Japan on November 4-5, 2015. The conference will be the first of a series of events expanding the global presence for Health 2.0 in Asia. This conference will feature ground-breaking insights and leadership within the global health care technology industry while showcasing cutting-edge technologies for user-generated health care. The conference will become a forum for attendees to build networks for exchanging innovative ideas and developing new business parternships, which will promote active inbound and outbound investment within the health-tech industry. MedPeer, Inc. will expand Health 2.0 activities across Japan in collaboration with local chapters by holding a series of health-tech hackathons.

About Health 2.0

Health 2.0 is the premiere showcase and catalyst for the advancement of new health technologies. Through a global series of conferences, thought leadership roundtables, developer competitions, pilot programs, and leading market intelligence, Health 2.0 drives the innovation and collaboration necessary to transform health and health care.

Media Contact
Sophie Park
[email protected]

Improving Diversity in Health Technology

0

Diversity in Health Technology

I am thrilled that Health 2.0 is today announcing a new program aimed at improving diversity in the field of health technology. This will run all year (and hopefully beyond) and will start at the Health 2.0 10th Annual Fall Conference on Sept 25-8, where we will host a group drawn from populations that are underrepresented in the health technology field. There’ll also be a dedicated session on the topic on Sept 26 at 12.15pm that has been generously supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Matthew Holt

The Problem: There is a lack of diversity among health technology innovators and a shortage of technologies that meet the needs of minority audiences. Technology is a powerful tool that can help improve health outcomes and alleviate problems within our current health system. As our society grows increasingly diverse and gaps in health among different populations increase, there is an urgency to develop solutions for underserved communities and diversify the population of innovators who are creating these solutions.   

The Conference Support Program: The Diversity in Health Technology Conference Support Program, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, encourages individuals interested in diversifying the health technology field and who are interested in, or currently engaged with, health technology, to attend Health 2.0’s 10th Annual Fall Conference (Sept 25-8). Individuals from populations that are underrepresented in the health technology field are particular encouraged to apply. The conference support will include complimentary access to the annual conference. Conference support recipients will be required to attend the “Diversity in Health Technology” workshop. The workshop will serve as the formal kickoff to a year-long campaign focused on engaging more diverse voices in health technology. Conference support recipients must also attend and participate in two webinars hosted by Health 2.0 to further review the diversity in technology issue, submit a post-conference summary to Health 2.0 of the individual’s conference experience that Health 2.0 may use for a white paper on the diversity issue and a summary about specific activities the individual plans to do over the next year to address diversity in technology.

For more information and to apply to join the program, visit the Diversity in Health Technology site.

 

GuideWell Wants Your Opinion: Deadline Tomorrow!

2

It goes without saying that a cancer diagnosis is daunting, terrifying and can be completely life-altering. With approximately 40 percent of men and women being diagnosed at some pointduring their lifetimes. cancer changes a survivor’s life from one-minute daily activities to grand life decisions. GuideWell Innovation is committed to

bringing great minds together to facilitate and transform new ideas into solutions, helping to jumpstart the path to better health. With the launch of the GuideWell Cancer Challenge this past February, GuideWell is harnessing the strength of collaboration to help support cancer patients and survivors with concierge services to support the wide range of needs of living with cancer.

The challenge deadline is nearly here, but it’s not too late to make your mark. We want to hear from you! Simply register or log in to the challenge website to submit an idea for a service, share insights about living with cancer, or view ideas submitted by others. You can then VOTE or COMMENT on any submitted idea. And get this—you don’t even have to submit an idea to be eligible for a prize! Just by providing your thoughts and insight on a submission you can enter the competition for cash prizes ranging from $1,000 to $5,000.

Interview with Alex Savic, CEO of Alensa Next Widgets

0

Alex Savic is CEO of Alensa NextWidgets, based in Zurich, Switzerland. Alex is a repeat presenter at Health 2.0 and will be presenting an update on the NextWidgets platform at Health 2.0 Europe in Paris April 6-7, 2010. NextWidgets allows pharmacies to sell their products online directly to consumers through widgets placed on relevant content publisher websites.

Indu Subaiya: Alex, tell us a bit about yourself and our background, and what Alensa is all about.

Alex Savic: I’ve been working in the generics industry since 2000, traveling a lot to India and Eastern Europe to meet with manufacturers and inspect manufacturing facilities. Alensa was mostly in the API and finished formulations business then. So to branch out, in 2006 we started working on an e-commerce platform for pharmacies which has since evolved into the NextWidgets platform.

Chelsea Clinton & US Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy at Health 2.0 Fall Conference 2015

0

Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 5.36.58 PMChelsea Clinton got the 9th Annual Fall Conference on the right foot sharing the numerous successes of the Clinton Foundation including improving school lunches, providing antiretroviral therapy to millions of people living with HIV worldwide, and advancing women’s health.

Announcing 1st And Future, A Startup Competition from the NFL and the Texas Medical Center

0

The Texas Medical Center has been working with Health 2.0 to promote startup competitions, incubators and health tech innovation for a while now. But this is the first time that I recall them giving the opportunity to win Superbowl tickets. Intrigued? Read on–Matthew Holt

On February 5, Super Bowl LI will take place in Houston, Texas at NRG Stadium. Houston is home to technology breakthroughs across all sectors: Spindletop, the Port of Houston, the Houston Ship Channel, Johnson Space Center, and the Texas Medical Center (TMC). With every discovery comes great benefit to those locally, and beyond.

With that spirit of innovation, the NFL has partnered with the Texas Medical Center, the largest medical complex in the world, to host a sports-tech pitch competition — 1st & Future.

1st and Future is a unique pitch competition that will take place at the Texas Medical Center Accelerator (TMCx) in Houston on February 4, 2017. Up to nine startups will be invited to present their solutions to help advance the game and the safety of its players to an exclusive audience including NFL team owners and executives, in addition to invitees of the Texas Medical Center and the NFL.

For more information about the pitch competition, here are some frequently asked questions:

What are the competition themes?

  • Communicating with the Athlete: New technologies that will improve the secure and safe means of communication between a coach on the sideline or in the coaches’ booth and a designated player on the field. Specifications can be found on the event website.
  • Training the Athlete: Educational and training innovations designed to reduce injury during practice or competition. Innovations may include training techniques or equipment.
  • Materials to Protect the Athlete: Novel or innovative solutions and materials that advance player health and safety while allowing for the highest-level of performance. Innovations may include, but are not limited to, materials that: improve breathability, heat dissipation or provide better protection for players by absorbing or mitigating force. These materials may be incorporated into protective equipment, padding, uniforms or footwear among other potential uses.

How do I apply?

Visit www.tmc.edu/1st-and-future to find more information on the program and a link to the application. The application deadline is January 20, 2017.           

Interview to Michael Seres, Patient Advocate and Founder of 11Health

0

At the age of 16 I was told by my gastroenterologist that the only way he would treat me is if we did this together as a team. I learnt very early on that I needed to take responsibility for my health. That led me to understand more about my blood levels, the important markers and what I needed to do next to assist my recovery. In the last 5 years, post my intestinal transplant, I really decided that I have a responsibility to give back to the surgeons who saved my life. The best way I could do that was to live my life. I started mentoring patients with IBD and intestinal failure and then started talking to the new transplant patients. From there I understood more the power of the patient and the role we can play in healthcare in the future. At Stanford Medicine X we have a philosophy of everyone included which is around the fact that everyone, including the patient, has a role to play and each role has to be based on mutual respect and empathy.