Health 2.0

alex christmas

Today we’re starting a series of more personal stories, looking at what makes interesting people in health care tick. Alex Carmichael is a rare multiple time CEO in health technology, and she has a very interesting tale to tell–Matthew Holt

Don’t worry, this isn’t your typical, syrupy founder story. Matthew asked me to share my experience selling my startup CureTogether to 23andMe, what ensued after that, and how I ended up at uBiome today.

So I thought, if I’m going to share, I might as well *really* share. Let you in behind the scenes to see what it was actually like.

(Bonus: at the end I’ve listed my top 11 life lessons, so make sure you read all the way through for that!)

The story starts…

October 1, 1976: I came into the world in Toronto, Canada, with striking violet eyes. My lawyer/politician mother and management consultant father gave me the name Alexandra, which means “leader of all mankind,” as they often reminded me. Talk about a family having high expectations!

Childhood: I remember loving to read and walk my dogs, who were probably my best friends. I went to a progressive Montessori school with an amazing teacher who believed in me and taught me the power of patience.

Teenage years: The “best” school in Toronto was a repressive and aggressive all-girls private school. My insane work ethic was drilled into me there, as well as at my mom’s political campaign offices, where I would work after school until late into the night.

College years: I met my first love, Danny, in a biochemistry lab at the University of Toronto. I chose the most difficult major (Molecular Genetics and Molecular Biology), because it would drive me hardest. Masochist much?

First startup, 1999: I dropped out of grad school, much to the horror of my extremely educated parents, to join a bioinformatics software company Danny had started in his bedroom in 1997. I taught myself how to code, design, sell, and run a company. We worked so much that we hardly left our apartment, except to get married, have a baby, and occasionally go to Tai Chi class. We lost most of our money in the dot com bust, and scraped by on rice and beans for a few years. It was so isolating and intense that I got really depressed and even suicidal once.

First exit, and move to California, 2005: We were seriously running out of money, so one day I made a big wall chart of all the possible companies that could acquire us, and we started going after each one relentlessly. After a few months, we got a meeting with Hitachi. They were interested, but didn’t seal the deal until we decided to put our stuff in storage and just show up in California, baby daughter Samantha in tow. One way or another, we were determined to make it work. They did end up acquiring us, for a few hundred thousand dollars. Not much for 8 years of invested time and energy, but really we just wanted to get to California, where the sun shines and the opportunity abounds. We finally made it!
Continue reading “The Real Story Of How I Sold Two Startups, The Chaos Afterwards, And What’s Next”

thcbAs the digital economy transforms health the most transformative ideas and consumer engagement solutions can sometimes challenge the industry’s ability to adopt and implement them. Reimbursement reforms, risk sharing, migration towards high deductible plans and the expansion of public and private coverage are converging to unleash an increasingly sophisticated consumer into the marketplace. Health systems and physician practices are consolidating and marketing their services direct to consumers in an attempt to underscore the critical differentiators valued by consumers – access, quality and affordability.  In today’s consumer economy, access remains a critical criterion for choosing and patronizing a provider or a practice. To assist the move toward consumerism, employers are introducing tools to facilitate comparison-shopping for services seen as “consumer-driven.”  The cost of elective and non-emergency services are highly variable and employers want employees to become consumers making decisions based not only on access but also cost. Continue reading “Patient Self-Scheduling 2.0″

Matthew Holt, Co-Chairman of Health 2.0 interviewed Amy Cueva, Chief Experience Officer of Mad*Pow to discuss some of exciting themes behind HxRefactored and what it means to change the experience of health care through design and technology. Amy will be speaking during the HxRefactored conference coming up on April 1-2.

Health 2.0 Co-Founder, Matthew Holt recently interviewed Alan Joseph Williams, Product Designer and User Researcher at Code for America’s Health Lab, which develops digital services for Californians eligible for or enrolled in social services like SNAP and Medicaid. Alan will be presenting at the HxRefactored Conference April 1-2 in Boston, MA.

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Validic is one of the more interesting companies in what we define as the “data utility layer.” They’ve had a bit of a meteoric rise in the past 2 years, and now have over 45 employees, over 90 customers and are now one of the main names that come up when the conversation turns to “how do we get all that device data into the EHR?” Today they announced a new deal with Cerner (release here). This is the quick interview with CTO Drew Schiller.

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I spent a day in Chicago last week and caught up with Stephanie Kowalski from Livongo. This is the company that has a very cool new blood glucose meter, with cloud communication, and a careteam and coaching function built in. The CEO is ex- Allscripts boss Glen Tullman (no stranger to building big companies) and the product launched at Health 2.0 last Fall. Take a look at the video to get a sense of the user experience and hear more about the company’s rapid evolution (and to hear me almost choke to death!)

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Lathan_HeadshotSo you have a great idea for an app. Not so fast: it took two years and over half a million dollars to get ours cleared for marketing by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Our app, DANA uses a mobile phone to records peoples’ reaction time during game-like tests. It also provides questionnaires that help clinicians evaluate brain health. Commissioned from AnthroTronix by the Department of Defense, the app will help diagnose concussion, depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

For something so important, a serious investment of time and money for clearance may not sound extravagant, but few small companies can afford a two-year go-to-market delay, not to mention the significant investment and heartache that goes with it. And although the FDA has tried to facilitate regulation by providing guides like the Mobile Medical Applications Guidance Document and the Mobile Medical Applications website, the regulatory process remains confusing.

Here are five simple lessons from our own experience that will help other entrepreneurs to do the right thing and engage with the FDA: Continue reading “The FDA & Me (or How to Explain Your Test Isn’t a Game)”

Tokyo, Japan – Health 2.0 announces the Health 2.0 Asia partnership with MedPeer, Inc. to showcase the Health 2.0 Asia conference Japan on November 4-5, 2015. The conference will be the first of a series of events expanding the global presence for Health 2.0 in Asia. This conference will feature ground-breaking insights and leadership within the global health care technology industry while showcasing cutting-edge technologies for user-generated health care. The conference will become a forum for attendees to build networks for exchanging innovative ideas and developing new business parternships, which will promote active inbound and outbound investment within the health-tech industry. MedPeer, Inc. will expand Health 2.0 activities across Japan in collaboration with local chapters by holding a series of health-tech hackathons.

About Health 2.0

Health 2.0 is the premiere showcase and catalyst for the advancement of new health technologies. Through a global series of conferences, thought leadership roundtables, developer competitions, pilot programs, and leading market intelligence, Health 2.0 drives the innovation and collaboration necessary to transform health and health care.

Media Contact
Sophie Park
sophie@health2con.com

flying cadeuciiThe HxRefactored Conference kicks off April 1st in Boston and we are excited to have Kavita Patel giving a Master Class in U.S. Health Policy.” Kavita is a Managing Director at The Brookings Institution in Washington, DC and has a long history working in health reform for both Ted Kennedy and at the Obama White House.  I interviewed Kavita to talk health care reform impact, insight, technology and and timing.

Matthew Holt: What are the most important changes that you are currently seeing due to Health Care Reform as well as in the health care system as a whole?

Kavita Patel:I would say the most important change is everybody is now intensely focused on transforming every aspect of health care, not only the consumer experience or people who are not already inside the health care system, but also for patients and then for their family members–whether it’s an insurance company that had massive numbers of enrollees, as a result of the Affordable Care Act and the last wave of 11 million people who signed up, or if it’s the one person’s primary care physician who is now looking at whether or not he or she should be part of the patient centered medical home, because he or she is kind of thinking through what the future of medicine will look like, as well as patients and consumers. Continue reading “A Master Class In Health Policy with Kavita Patel”

Malay Ghandi

Rock Health has been around since 2011 first as an accelerator and now as an early stage venture fund. Matthew Holt had a chance to sit down with Rock Health’s Managing Director Malay Gandhi ahead of his appearance at WinterTech to discuss how Rock Health looks at the consumer side of digital health, and what developments Rock Health thinks we’ll see in the near future.

Matthew Holt: It’s Matthew Holt with Malay Gandhi. He is the managing director of Rock Health, and has been officially for what, nearly a year or so now, Malay?  Is that right?

Malay Gandhi: Since June, June of this year.

MH: So about six months. Most of us know that Rock Health was founded by Halle Tecco and Nate Gross a few years back, 2011, and probably was the first and most influential of the incubators and accelerators that target health care specifically. Perhaps you can explain a little bit about how Rock Health works. Most people know that Rock Health is a nonprofit, and that you guys do a lot in terms of stimulating the ecosystem with small events, big events, and your reports on financing and so on. But you are mainly a fund and the amount of money that you invest in your companies has been increasing from I think $20,000 in the early days to $100,000 plus recently? Could you explain how that actually works compared to other accelerators or incubators?

MG: Yeah. Essentially, the way Rock Health works is there are three big things that we do, all under our mission to support and fund entrepreneurs. We have our venture arm, which does seed investments in the companies now. We’ll write checks up to $250,000 per company, really at the seed-stage. We conduct research which we release publicly. Let’s say about four reports or so a year, as you mentioned, tracking funding, but also doing deep diving in various topical areas.

Then our third area, we host a couple of events each year. Our signature events are the Health Innovation Summit, which is for everybody; the CEO Summit, which is an event for founders and CEOs of digital health companies; and then finally, the XX Retreat, which is a women’s professional leadership group for women who work in health care. Continue reading “Rock Health and the Search for ‘Home Screen Health App’”

MASTHEAD STUFF

MATTHEW HOLT
Founder & Publisher

JOHN IRVINE
Executive Editor

MUNIA MITRA, MD
Editor, Business of Healthcare

JOE FLOWER
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MICHAEL MILLENSON
Contributing Editor

MICHELLE NOTEBOOM
Business Development

VIKRAM KHANNA
Editor-At-Large, Wellness

ALINE NOIZET
Editor-At-Large, Europe
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